EMT training helpful?

  1. I'm currently in LPN school and I am thinking of taking an EMT certification course to get more experience (i'm not a cna or anything) to help me get more comfortable with things in general. it's evening, I can do it after school, but it won't leave much time for homework. I thought it might help b/c I would like to maybe work in the ER for awhile after I get my license. I'm going on to get my RN after my lpn. Any advise from anyone that was an emt before a nurse, or even an emt after a nurse? I'm just worried I won't have much time for homework. the class is 6:00-10:00pm. Thanks.
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   ritarunningfeet
    I am an RN in an ER and work with many Nurses who were emts or paramedics first. And in my opinion they seem very comfortable with the trauma aspect right off the bat, where as I wasn't exposed to it until I started in the ER. So it can be benificial, however not necessary. I actually am taking an EMT class currently because I want to be a flight nurse some day.:roll
  4. by   TheCommuter
    Obtaining your EMT certification would be extremely helpful because you will know exactly what actions to take in emergent situations. In addition, you will absolutely do well in code situations, whereas someone without the EMT certification might not feel quite as comfortable.
  5. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from sconoli
    I'm currently in LPN school and I am thinking of taking an EMT certification course to get more experience (i'm not a cna or anything) to help me get more comfortable with things in general. it's evening, I can do it after school, but it won't leave much time for homework. I thought it might help b/c I would like to maybe work in the ER for awhile after I get my license. I'm going on to get my RN after my lpn. Any advise from anyone that was an emt before a nurse, or even an emt after a nurse? I'm just worried I won't have much time for homework. the class is 6:00-10:00pm. Thanks.
    While I would certainly agree that taking the EMT course would be an advantage, I would NOT do it simultaneously with LPN courses. The EMT course (at least here in New York) is known to be very vigorous and the information may be conflicting. Since you are already in LPN school, I'd consider taking it afterwards. Also, in order to finish what you already started in LPN school, it would he hard to not do homework and study if you have the distraction of yet, another course. Each semester may require more from you. Once you complete one course, then, do the other. There is no reason not to have both licenses or certifications, but, don't blow what you already put time into. Just my 2 cents....
  6. by   EMT&PNStf
    i became EMT certified before i started LPN school. i think it helped me become more comfortable with pts and in emergency situations. i don't use many of my EMT skills right now as a PNS, but i think they'll help me after i become an LPN. i wouldn't recommend doing EMT and LPN classes at the same time, it's to easy to get your skills and scope of practice confused.
  7. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from EMT&PNStf
    i became EMT certified before i started LPN school. i think it helped me become more comfortable with pts and in emergency situations. i don't use many of my EMT skills right now as a PNS, but i think they'll help me after i become an LPN. i wouldn't recommend doing EMT and LPN classes at the same time, it's to easy to get your skills and scope of practice confused.
    That is basically what I was thinking. I believe that both skills going hand in hand are EXCELLENT...it is doing them both simultaneously that has me saying do one or the other. It is easy to take a nursing exam and get a passage from an EMT textbook on the brain and answer questions wrong.
  8. by   postmortem_cowboy
    HINT HINT... you committed yourself to your LPN, it has a higher "food chain" licensure than an EMT, finish that first, here in California, EMT's make around 9 dollars an hour, LVN's make around 20.

    As for me, I did my EMT first in 2000, got working in the field, and realized I couldn't do anything fun. So after being one for 2 years I decided to go into nursing school, I get to do all the stuff that I wasn't "allowed" to do as an EMT practicing as a nurse. If you'd have done the EMT program before hand, it would be like adding to your current skills and knowledge and be very helpful on your PN studies, and make it just that simpler. However, trying to do both at the same time, no-no. If you really want to do the EMT program, even just for fun or the experience, do it while your waiting to take boards, there's 2 ride alongs you have to complete with ambulance companies, and my program required 2 shifts in an ER for exposure as well. There's also ER courses you can take as a nurse to get exposed to the ED, think about that as well, don't work backwards, work forwards.


    Wayne.
  9. by   Calgon-take.me.away
    Good evening. As you can see, I was an EMT before I became a nurse. It proved very helpful, since I had already been thru an A & P class while receiving my EMT. I feel it really gave me an advantage. Only thing is, ya kinda gotta remember where you are at and what your scope of practice is when you are rendereing care. Being an EMT, you can order and administer O2, but as an LPN, you have to have an MD order to administer O2. And as an LPN, you will have a much better working knowledge of care after you ship your pt from, for example, a LTC facility. Also, code status does come in to play at certain times. On the ambulalnce, unless you have actual DNR papers with you, you will code. You will find families that even though grandma is 90+ and ful of cancer, they will call you to come and transport to ACF and grandma arrests,,you run a code. If grandma was in an LTC facility, and DNR papers are present, grandma is left to go to her reward is a much more dignified and restful way
  10. by   pagandeva2000
    In New York, any nurse is able to administer 2 liters of O-2 without an order; but I can certainly see how the scopes can mix a person up. This is why I think the OP should complete the commitment to the LPN course, since he/she is still currently in the class. Why waste money and possibly burn out from taking both courses at the same time? I'd do the EMT afterwards, to allow more choices and to be a better practitioner.

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