Doing away with LPNs - page 3

I am with a hospital in Idaho right now which has LPNs and RNs working together in pods. They just called a meeting saying they are going to try and do away with LPNs hospital wide because there... Read More

  1. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    The large hospital system I will be starting at refers to LPN's as nursing support staff and they really only use them in their outpatient clinics.
    Jeez, there's a real confidence booster.
  2. by   dbsn00
    Several hospitals in my area still hire LPN's but I'll tell you, I have NO desire to work where I'm not appreciated so until I get my RN I won't work in the hospitals. This message board has pretty much affirmed my belief on how most RN's feel about LPN's...not all but most. I do agree that on some units it would be difficult for LPN's because of the limits on our scope of practice but I don't understand not utilizing them at all, & to actually phase out seasoned LPN's - it's such a waste.
  3. by   spidermonkey
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    Last edit by spidermonkey on Mar 15, '06
  4. by   LPNer
    Quote from GN1974
    ........ Some hospitals like all RN units because the RN isn't as restricted--and from the experienced LPN point of view having gained on the job knowledge and experience that should allow them to function in a similar role. Unfortunately, the board doesn't recognize on-the-job knowledge and experience to be equal to the RN degree...and to a great extent it shouldn't be. My advice to all those that are concerned about this issue is to seek out your options for furthering your education. There are so many options out there--one just needs to find them and act on it.
    Karen
    I did not mean that experience alone should allow a greater scope of practice but that the BON should institute a ladder that would allow LPNs to test and gain a rung on the ladder if passed. This would not make them RNs. They would still be LPNs with a broader scope of practice in that area.
    A system such as this would provide the health care system with nurses with the proven knowledge required, even though not achieved through acedamia, while allowing LPNs with many years of experience some mobility in their carreers.
  5. by   graysonret
    Every once and awhile, over the years since the 80s, one hears about doing away with the LPNs and staying with RNs only. Already licensed LPNs would be "grandfathered" into RNs. That's fine with me as long as I don't lose pay and benes, though I sincerely think it would never come to be. Otherwise, keeping experienced LPNs is a must for many places. I remember taking all the courses, years ago, to become an RN; only to find out that I would lose pay because I would be "classed" as a new RN, rather than an experienced LPN, which I never understood. The pay drop was quite a bit at the place I was working. As I explained to my military father, I'd rather be a first or master sargeant, than a new 2nd lieutenant. More pay...less responsibility. Let others fuss over management, I'll stick with the patients....where I belong.
  6. by   LPNer
    Quote from graysonret
    Every once and awhile, over the years since the 80s, one hears about doing away with the LPNs and staying with RNs only. Already licensed LPNs would be "grandfathered" into RNs. That's fine with me as long as I don't lose pay and benes, though I sincerely think it would never come to be. Otherwise, keeping experienced LPNs is a must for many places. I remember taking all the courses, years ago, to become an RN; only to find out that I would lose pay because I would be "classed" as a new RN, rather than an experienced LPN, which I never understood. The pay drop was quite a bit at the place I was working. As I explained to my military father, I'd rather be a first or master sargeant, than a new 2nd lieutenant. More pay...less responsibility. Let others fuss over management, I'll stick with the patients....where I belong.
    I've been hearing the same thing since the 70s! I understand NY has taken steps to do just that; however, I don't see the final date for "convertion" ever being met. As always, that date will keep getting set back.
    Even Kentucky, at one time, had said it was going to require all LPNs to get credits towards their RN as continueing education requirements. If that were the case, none of the LPNs I've been knowing for 20 years or more could possibly be practicing as LPNs now....surely, even just a class of two a year would have produced a degree by now!
    Many states have tried it and they all have found that LPNs are valuable nurses, LPNs are cost effective nurses, LPNs can never be replaced.

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