Are LPN/LVNs a dying breed? - page 7

Hi all.... I know this topic has probably been around before, but I was hoping some of you seasoned LPNs could comment on what you think about the future of LPN/LVN nursing. I'm planning to... Read More

  1. by   fhrpalpn
    yes where I work it the same I work 75% as a Psych aid but I don't loose and money that an advantage. here in pa.
  2. by   miffe03
    Hi, I,m an LVN living and working in northern California, and yes its in a hospital med-surg, 12hr nights. While its true the unions that represent RNs in California are trying to squeeze out LVNs the biggest trouble maker is CNA, Oh what do these letters stand for California Nurses Association, Who apparently don't recognise LVNs as nurses. However local hospitals around where I live have been hiring LVNs for all shifts and this includes full-part time with benefits. Taking away skills taught to LVNs is a waste of time because you will never remove that skill from the mind. Thanks for reading.
  3. by   Zouker
    Here in VA, the hospitals are slowly putting us out, or retaining us to do CNA work, and pay us that. Got a call from UVA hospital a couple of weeks ago as I had applied there, they were only offering me $12/hr to work with them, while LTCs and Rehabs start offering at $18 and up. And then worse, down here if you're an LPN in a hospital, boy- you will earn every penny of it cuz the RNs will make sure they work you. Reminds me: there's a joke going around; LPN = Low Paid Nurse, RN = Real Nurse. That's why I've registered for an RN program already, just incase. Besides as someone mentioned, RNs get a little more respect, but with it come more stress and responsibility.

    -Zouk
  4. by   lpnflorida
    http://bhpr.hrsa.gov/healthworkforce...ing/lpn/c6.htm

    Above link to Use of LPN's supply/demand. I read the entire article. I found it of interest. Perhaps others will also
  5. by   douglpn
    They say that some of the hospitals want you to get your RN, but then in my area of ohio there must be 6 LPN schools in a 40 mile radius!
    jobs are slim at times.
  6. by   Jen71RN
    I hope not, but I believe that is what NY state is trying for..I became an LPN in 1993. My first job was for a Med/Surg Tele floor- It was the typical new grad hire time- there were 12 of us going through orientation - 6 new LPNs, 6 new RNs. As LPN's we were able to manage our patients with just the Charge nurse looking over our assignments. Three years ago, NY decided we had all been working "Above our scope of practice"- My Nurse Manager called me at home and informed me that as LPNs, we could no longer take our own assignments, listen to lung,bowel sounds, chart on much of anything- and to add insult to injury, we now had to be paired up with an RN, who would oversee us while working our shift. You have NO idea how horrible it is to suddenly not be capable of doing your job. The RNs resented what they saw as their increased patient load- it commonly caused hurt feelings, actually caused things to be missed,and all three of us LPNs that worked the floor got to the point where we hated going in to work. We would get paired up with nurses who at times were BRAND-SPANKING new- who were complaining about how horrible it was to be paired up with the LPNs- These were newbies who knew very little about floor nursing. Several times we worked a shift where there were two RNs and two LPNs, plus the CN. It was common to hear RNs complain about the staffing, saying that "It was SO bad, we worked with only 2 nurses last night!" Things like that rip your heart out.Out of the three LPNs from night shift, I'm the only one who is now an RN.I actually enjoy my profession again, but I still believe LPNs have a very important place on the healthcare team.Unfortunatly, those who make policy in NY and at my Hospital do not agree. The new policy is that NO LPNs, no matter what their experience level, can be hired to work on the Med/Surg floors. Nursing Homes only. It makes me sick to see practical nursing students coming in for clinicals...I want to warn them that they are in for a world of "discrimination" in NY.What a waste.
  7. by   kstec
    I think it depends on where you live. My area kicked LPN's to the curb a while ago. Your choices were either get your RN or get fired. I know when I was in LPN school we especially focused on geriatrics, which is predominately where LPN's are. I used to think or was convinced to think by especially this web site that LPN's were pretty useless and were only ltc material, and that RN's were hospital material. Well the longer I've been a nurse, I've found out that is incorrect. In the ltc facility that I work in half of our staff are RN's, which in most ltc facilities is just unheard of. That I know of we have 4 RN, BSN's, and 1 RN, MSN going for her doctorate. I of course asked why aren't you guys in the hospitals and they proceeded to tell me that working in a hospital does not make a nurse and working in ltc doesn't make you any less of a nurse. The only place that I can't work as a LPN is the hospital. I can work in clinics, hospice, homecare, ltc, insurance companies and rehabilitation facilities. I'm sure there is more, but I can't think of them right now. So no LPN's are not a dying breed. If you don't like what areas of employment that are available to you, then go back for your RN. But if you like being a LPN with our options, don't let anyone discourage you. When I save a residents life when they are a full code, they do not care whether I'm a LPN or RN and in reality it really doesn't matter. My theory is if everyone obtained their RN, BSN and up, who would be left to take care of the patients, not all of them are going to stay at the bedside where the burnout rate is atronomical (sp). We all have a place in healthcare and all contribute something. When the baby boomers hit retirement, it'll be to bad if all LPN's are banished. Who's going to take care of them? Not us LPN, because were underqualified, NOT......
  8. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from Jen71RN
    I hope not, but I believe that is what NY state is trying for..I became an LPN in 1993. My first job was for a Med/Surg Tele floor- It was the typical new grad hire time- there were 12 of us going through orientation - 6 new LPNs, 6 new RNs. As LPN's we were able to manage our patients with just the Charge nurse looking over our assignments. Three years ago, NY decided we had all been working "Above our scope of practice"- My Nurse Manager called me at home and informed me that as LPNs, we could no longer take our own assignments, listen to lung,bowel sounds, chart on much of anything- and to add insult to injury, we now had to be paired up with an RN, who would oversee us while working our shift. You have NO idea how horrible it is to suddenly not be capable of doing your job. The RNs resented what they saw as their increased patient load- it commonly caused hurt feelings, actually caused things to be missed,and all three of us LPNs that worked the floor got to the point where we hated going in to work. We would get paired up with nurses who at times were BRAND-SPANKING new- who were complaining about how horrible it was to be paired up with the LPNs- These were newbies who knew very little about floor nursing. Several times we worked a shift where there were two RNs and two LPNs, plus the CN. It was common to hear RNs complain about the staffing, saying that "It was SO bad, we worked with only 2 nurses last night!" Things like that rip your heart out.Out of the three LPNs from night shift, I'm the only one who is now an RN.I actually enjoy my profession again, but I still believe LPNs have a very important place on the healthcare team.Unfortunatly, those who make policy in NY and at my Hospital do not agree. The new policy is that NO LPNs, no matter what their experience level, can be hired to work on the Med/Surg floors. Nursing Homes only. It makes me sick to see practical nursing students coming in for clinicals...I want to warn them that they are in for a world of "discrimination" in NY.What a waste.

    I'm curious to know where in New York this is; I have not had this experience in the Queens area. Hospitals out here are still hiring LPNs. They are being removed from places like ICU, ER, and L&D in some, or those working on the floors are given assignments that are within our scope of practice.

    One thing I have learned, though is that while the RNs may feel inconvienced, I will do what I can to assist, but if it is not within my scope of practice, then, that is it...I have a license to protect as well. I want to support my family, eat, care for myself and my home. Sucks for those that choose to take it out on me, I refuse to let it get to me.
  9. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from kstec
    I think it depends on where you live. My area kicked LPN's to the curb a while ago. Your choices were either get your RN or get fired. I know when I was in LPN school we especially focused on geriatrics, which is predominately where LPN's are. I used to think or was convinced to think by especially this web site that LPN's were pretty useless and were only ltc material, and that RN's were hospital material. Well the longer I've been a nurse, I've found out that is incorrect. In the ltc facility that I work in half of our staff are RN's, which in most ltc facilities is just unheard of. That I know of we have 4 RN, BSN's, and 1 RN, MSN going for her doctorate. I of course asked why aren't you guys in the hospitals and they proceeded to tell me that working in a hospital does not make a nurse and working in ltc doesn't make you any less of a nurse. The only place that I can't work as a LPN is the hospital. I can work in clinics, hospice, homecare, ltc, insurance companies and rehabilitation facilities. I'm sure there is more, but I can't think of them right now. So no LPN's are not a dying breed. If you don't like what areas of employment that are available to you, then go back for your RN. But if you like being a LPN with our options, don't let anyone discourage you. When I save a residents life when they are a full code, they do not care whether I'm a LPN or RN and in reality it really doesn't matter. My theory is if everyone obtained their RN, BSN and up, who would be left to take care of the patients, not all of them are going to stay at the bedside where the burnout rate is atronomical (sp). We all have a place in healthcare and all contribute something. When the baby boomers hit retirement, it'll be to bad if all LPN's are banished. Who's going to take care of them? Not us LPN, because were underqualified, NOT......

    I feel the same way...don't let anyone rain on your parade. I KNOW I make a difference each place I work at. I was on vacation, returned today, and EVERYONE of them ran to me and said that I should never go on vacation again, and they didn't realize what a difference I made until I was out for two weeks.
  10. by   Lovely_RN
    I've noticed that HHC facilities still hire a lot of LPNs but I have not seen too many listings in private hospitals for the NYC/Metro area.



    Quote from pagandeva2000
    I'm curious to know where in New York this is; I have not had this experience in the Queens area. Hospitals out here are still hiring LPNs. They are being removed from places like ICU, ER, and L&D in some, or those working on the floors are given assignments that are within our scope of practice.

    One thing I have learned, though is that while the RNs may feel inconvienced, I will do what I can to assist, but if it is not within my scope of practice, then, that is it...I have a license to protect as well. I want to support my family, eat, care for myself and my home. Sucks for those that choose to take it out on me, I refuse to let it get to me.
  11. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from Bx_RN2B
    I've noticed that HHC facilities still hire a lot of LPNs but I have not seen too many listings in private hospitals for the NYC/Metro area.
    I work at a HHC facility.... Jamacia Hospital continues to hire them, I understand, and New York Hospital of Queens-I have friends who worked there in the recent past. Beth Israel Hospital offered me a position in their clinic, but I don't want to commute to Manhattan. I would not be surprized if it did start to shift in the near future due to many hospitals wishing to apply for Magnet Status. We'll see how it goes, because I've seen it shift from one end of the pendulum to the other too often.
  12. by   Jen71RN
    [quote=pagandeva2000;3197403]I'm curious to know where in New York this is; I have not had this experience in the Queens area. Hospitals out here are still hiring LPNs. They are being removed from places like ICU, ER, and L&D in some, or those working on the floors are given assignments that are within our scope of practice.

    I work in a hospital in Utica NY- It's about half way between Syracuse and Albany.It isn't unusual here- I lost a job I loved in Maternity in another smaller hospital in the area- I'd worked there 8 yrs, and I did a good job- BUT, they decided we werent worth paying the insurance. The entire situation makes me so angry:angryfire
  13. by   pagandeva2000
    [QUOTE=Jen71RN;3200850]
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    I'm curious to know where in New York this is; I have not had this experience in the Queens area. Hospitals out here are still hiring LPNs. They are being removed from places like ICU, ER, and L&D in some, or those working on the floors are given assignments that are within our scope of practice.

    I work in a hospital in Utica NY- It's about half way between Syracuse and Albany.It isn't unusual here- I lost a job I loved in Maternity in another smaller hospital in the area- I'd worked there 8 yrs, and I did a good job- BUT, they decided we werent worth paying the insurance. The entire situation makes me so angry:angryfire
    Thanks for the clarity! At least you are currently working in a hospital...there are so many that are not. I can certainly understand why you would be so angry, though.

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