Why do Filipino Nurses want to work in the US? - page 2

by bobby123 16,145 Views | 24 Comments

Just want to find out why Philippine graduate nurses want to work in the US. I am a Philippine graduate nurse that got my licence back in '96. Took me five years to get to the UK but never wanted or intended to apply to work... Read More


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    Thanks for the posts guys.

    Now I think I have an understanding of why Filipino Nurses want to work in the US. Having relatives is a no brainer. The financial rewards as per dibuh0 is tempting, very tempting and the history of Filipino nurses' migration to other countries by Juan de la Cruz had been very informative.

    But if you look at the recent posts about the job trends in the US, thanks to the GFC the jobs are no longer there.

    For those guys who still want to go to the 'Promised Land', equip yourselves with experience so that when those doors open you'll be ready... or take a detour
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    dibuho wrote: yes of course, compared to dubai, saudi, canada or even there in UK, the salary pay in the US is much greater.. starting regular nurse base pay in california (bay area) without experience new graduate is $40.. and if you work night shift, it's 12% difference, plus overtime? overtime is time and a half, and full time is just 3 times a week and 4 days off.. and if you're an experienced nurse with 5 years, you can be earning $60 per hour without differential
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    The $40 per hour in the San Francisco Bay Area seems about right. In the hospital where I used to work, the starting salary is now about $50/hr. and it tops to over $70/hr. for RNs with more than 25 years of seniority.

    I have a nephew who work in Phoenix, Arizona who is earning around $30/hr. The salary is lower compared to the Bay Area but the cost of living in Phoenix is much lower.

    Florida RNs earn even less and the working conditions are less than desirable compared to California's. In California, an RN in acute care hospital cannot have more than 5 patients, in other states such a Florida, RNs are typically assigned 6-8 patients. But in Florida, the cost of living is lower. It is "all relative" as they say.

    At the risk of sounding too materialistic, but if you are the type of person who wants to earn lots of $$$, California is the place to come. I see many RNs driving luxury cars (Mercedes Benz, BMW, Lexus), able to afford nicer homes and expensive vacations because they get paid handsomely. This is not to say that RNs in other states cannot afford these finer things in life though.

    If you are one of the lucky RNs who work or used to work in a government hospital here in the U.S.A. like myself, then you have that "early retirement" privilege and you get to retire in your 50's and get lifetime pension.

    The thing nowadays is that there are so many unemployed American nurses desiring for the same U.S. nursing jobs nurses in the Philippines hope to bag. Sadly, things aren't so rosy right now for Filipino nurses wishing to get hired here in the U.S.A.

    Just be patient folks. For how long? I wish I knew.
  3. 0
    hi there. I am a novice nurse, graduated last 2010 and on the same year got my license, actually during my college days I really wanted to work in the USA because of the great salary of our fellow nurses there, but as time passes by, I changed my mind and rather go to Canada because currently I am working in a call center catering Canadian customers for a telephone company (because there are no chance to get hired as a staff nurse position here). hopefully I could get a shot to work in Canada in the future. God bless to all
  4. 1
    The salary variation in the US coincides with the cost of living in the particular metropolitan area. I also live and work in San Francisco where salaries are the highest for RN's and as an NP with years of experience, I am doing quite well. But the cost of living is also expensive. I live within the city limits and housing is highly overpriced from what the landlords are asking for rent to the cost of owning property. California taxes are high to begin with. To me, the trade off is being able to live in a city where you are close to everything, being ten minutes away from where I work, and not having to deal with snow in the winter. There are cheaper options to live in the Bay Area but I just happen to prefer living in the city. Prior to coming to San Francisco, I lived in the midwest where there are four seasons, the salaries are not as high, but the cost of living is lower. It wasn't bad either because homes are affordable even in good neighborhoods and I found midwesterners to be naturally warm and neighborly.

    With retorgression in place, it would be beneficial for anyone to have a plan B. Canada is a great country. They have very progressive politics in that they have national health insurance and have liberal views on most social issues. Their economy is better than the US right now. If anyone is interested in going there, I would advise them to know the country well and its culture. It is just north of the US but they have a distinct cultural identity and have a lot of national pride. The entire country has four seasons unlike the US mainland where there are climatic variations depending on which region you are in and lifestyles vary depending on where you are. The seasonal changes have shaped the way of life in Canada from being a winter sports destination, to seeing blooms in the spring, to exploring vast areas of land in the summer, to seeing colors change in the fall. Plan on going to Canada to be a part of their culture and not make it a route to end up somewhere else later on.
    Fiona59 likes this.
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    when i was a new grad i started 25$ per hour. and here they seldom give OT bec. they dont want to pay time and a half, lets say u earn 25$/hr, if OT u will be paid approx. 37$/hr. excluding the night and weekend differentials
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    Here in the State of California there is a law (at least it is followed most of the time anyway) that nurses in acute care hospitals cannot have more than 5 patients in the Medical-Surgical unit, and no more than 2 patients in the intensive care unit. (This a good thing as all nurses know)

    The nursing profession has become quite lucarative here to tell you the truth. Here in the San Francisco Bay Area, California the starting salary for RNs is around $50/hr. in acute care hospitals, topping to more than $70/hour.

    If you work in a private hospital, they may offer 401K retirement (Google it if you don't know this). In many public hospitals like where I used to work, we did NOT have to contribute to our retirement account (the city, county, state or federal government did, therefore no additional salary reduction), you could retire at age 50 after 20 years or more of employment (depending in which government entity you work for), you are then eligible for lifetime $$$ pension, health, dental and vision health benefits. When you reach the age of 62-65, you get additional retirement pension from the Federal Social Security Administration aside from your first pension.

    To earn these benefits you have to get hired, then serve at least 20 years in a very busy and stressful hospital where most of your patients are homeless, have polysubstance abuse problems, psychotics, etc. It's a government hospital but make no mistake in your assumption, this is a modern hospital.

    If you think the job there is easy, then think again.
    Last edit by Daly City RN on Aug 31, '11
  7. 0
    Quote from Daly City RN
    Here in the State of California there is a law (at least it is followed most of the time anyway) that nurses in acute care hospitals cannot have more than 5 patients in the Medical-Surgical unit, and no more than 2 patients in the intensive care unit. (This a good thing as all nurses know)

    The nursing profession has become quite lucarative here to tell you the truth. Here in the San Francisco Bay Area, California the starting salary for RNs is around $50/hr. in acute care hospitals, topping to more than $70/hour.

    If you work in a private hospital, they may offer 401K retirement (Google it if you don't know this). In many public hospitals like where I used to work, we did NOT have to contribute to our retirement account (the city, county, state or federal government did, therefore no additional salary reduction), you could retire at age 50 after 20 years or more of employment (depending in which government entity you work for), you are then eligible for lifetime $$$ pension, health, dental and vision health benefits. When you reach the age of 62-65, you get additional retirement pension from the Federal Social Security Administration aside from your first pension.

    To earn these benefits you have to get hired, then serve at least 20 years in a very busy and stressful hospital where most of your patients are homeless, have polysubstance abuse problems, psychotics, etc. It's a government hospital but make no mistake in your assumption, this is a modern hospital.

    If you think the job there is easy, then think again.
    yeah thats wat i heard. here in MS we have 7-9 pts.. so i left MS.. it was stressful
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    Im a RN in Florida, and I make 21.50 an hour as a new RN. On the weekends I make 25/hr. It is true that the cost of living is somewhat lower, but I dont really think getting paid 2/3 of the US average is really justified. My rent for a 2 bedroom house is 650. In CT where I am from, a 2-3 bedroom house would be 1200-1400/mo. If I were making $30/hr in CT, I'd only be losing out on 700 bucks a month in rent. I would still have 1000 bucks more a month to my name that I dont have here. Everything else besides housing costs the same,gas is 3.89 /gal, food costs the same, a liter of coca cola is 1.99. Electricity I would say is about the same because instead of heat running all winter we have central air running year long. If I were to own a home, the home owners insurance is crazy expensive and sometimes isnt guaranteed to pay out d/t hurricanes, tornadoes. If there is a huge hurricane that demolishes thousands of homes, there's not that much money to go around. And you need flood insurance on top of that. Many houses also have pools which adds on to your insurance cost. The only benefit right now for me living in Fl is that I actually am employed because there were many hiring freezes and lay offs in CT hospitals. I am hoping the economy turns around in the next few years because I do want to move back to CT and at least feel like I am earning more of what I deserve to be making. And Florida wonders why they have a severe nursing shortage and the BON asks for suggestions to alleviate the nursing shortage when you apply for their RN license- the answer is easy- pay what the US average RN salary is! Uh duhhh.
  9. 0
    I am a seasoned nurse. I have worked in Florida as a nurse for the last 30 years. Call it burn out or whatever, but it seem that working conditions have worsened. There is a lot of stress in the hospitals in Florida and I fully agree that you are not paid for the responsibilities of managing people lives and providing safety that we do. Budget cuts get in the way. In the last 5 years my salary have increased by $3. For what you give up the salaries should be higher considering high patient ratio, missed lunch and unreliable expectations from upper management. I want to move to California is there any advice that anyone can offer me?
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    Quote from On the move
    I am a seasoned nurse. I have worked in Florida as a nurse for the last 30 years. Call it burn out or whatever, but it seem that working conditions have worsened. There is a lot of stress in the hospitals in Florida and I fully agree that you are not paid for the responsibilities of managing people lives and providing safety that we do. Budget cuts get in the way. In the last 5 years my salary have increased by $3. For what you give up the salaries should be higher considering high patient ratio, missed lunch and unreliable expectations from upper management. I want to move to California is there any advice that anyone can offer me?
    If your heart is set on moving to CA, start by endorsing your license here. Then look for jobs online. With experience, you may have a better chance of finding a job. Another option is to sign up as a traveler. There are still hospitals with travelers here. The mandatory staffing ratios in acute care hospitals have made it easier here for RN's than in other states. The unions are very involved in bettering nursing employment conditions for the most part.


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