which countries outside U.S. would accept new nurses (no job experience)?

  1. Which countries would be willing to accept new nurses without any professional experience? It seems that at least three years is required for foreign nurses who'd like to work in Europe. (I'm in the U.S.) What about Canada, Australia, or some Middle Eastern locations such as Dubai or Bahrain? I know it's a general question but I'm interested in living overseas at some point, partly since my husband, an immigrant, has friends and relatives in various countries and would like to live closer to them.

    Do nearly all other countries such as those mentioned above require a BSN rather than just an ADN? That's my impression from reading some threads in this forum. Also, is an accredited BSN program (in the U.S.) automatically "good enough" (since it would meet the three-year training requirement that seems to be in place for Canada and Europe) or does it depend on the number of clinical hours in the program?

    (I haven't even started a nursing program yet but am interested in doing so. I'm also wondering, though, if perhaps I should emigrate first and go into nursing later. I just thought that already being a nurse might give me more options - but it's all sounding more complicated and long-drawn-out than I expected, given a supposed nursing shortage that's said to be worse in Europe than in the U.S. I really thought that nursing would be in more demand/more marketable than my bachelor's degree from 20 years ago combined with a current 2-year certificate program in accounting, but now I'm not so sure - especially after reading about the difficulty of newly trained nurses in the U.K. to find work.)
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   suzanne4
    The biggest thing that you are not realizing is that you have to go thru the immigration process to be able to work in another country. Having the RN will give you precedent in some countries, but you also need to go thru the licensing exam in the other countries for the most part, as well as pass the language exam for that country.

    The earliest that you could even consider applying would be after you have a completed set of transcripts. And then the average time is about 18 months before the necessary paperwork would be completed for most countries, to be able to begin work.

    The US happens to be one of the countries that will permit a new grad from another country to actually sit for the NCLEX, without having work experiecne in their home country, as well as a license there.

    I definitely suggest going the route of the BSN, it will give you a wider choice of countries that will accept your RN.
  4. by   Silverdragon102
    the UK is currently going through changes within its health system and very much I feel for the worse. For the UK I believe you only need a couple of years experience which you can get whilst going through the immigration process. Only now you need 20 days protected studying on the UK healthcare system with an accredited course these can be found here

    http://www.nmc-uk.org/(znw42f55erkgf...ocumentID=1191

    and now with immigration you have protection coming into the country to take this course and the info is here

    http://www.workingintheuk.gov.uk/wor...homepage.html?

    work is there for nurses it is just a case of finding where you want to live and approaching the local hospitals. If your husband is a EU immigrant you may find it easier to get a spousal work permit than someone who isn't

    Best of luck in what ever you do but would recommend doing your nursing first as if you decide to do your nurse training say in the UK you will find it will not cover you to sit the NCLEX and work in the US without doing some top up courses
  5. by   km05
    Quote from suzanne4
    The biggest thing that you are not realizing is that you have to go thru the immigration process to be able to work in another country.
    No, actually, I’m quite well aware of the immigration requirements for programs such as the Skilled Worker Program in the U.K. and Canada – so I don’t see why you’re making the assumption I’m uninformed about the immigration process. (When talking about the process being more long-drawn-out, I was referring specifically to the three years of training - vs. just two - followed by the three years of professional job experience, as I indicated in my previous post.) So, my question remains: which countries would be willing to accept new nurses with no job experience? (I'm thinking this is more likely to be a place such as Dubai, since it's a very international city/emirate with about 90% of its residents on two- or three- year work visas - but at least a year or two of job experience is probably a standard requirement there, as well.)

    Silverdragon: Thanks for the helpful info! But what about all the budget cutbacks in the U.K.'s NHS and the newspaper article (did you post that link?) about newly trained nurses in the U.K. being unable to find work? Is it not as grim as such articles make it sound? I'm really interested in knowing since it's London where my husband has the most relatives, and that's his top choice so far. I realize the immigration process could take at least a few years, so your suggestion to get the nursing experience while waiting on the immigration paperwork is a good one.

    However, I didn't know that coming from the U.K. as a U.K.-trained nurse (with American citizenship) could put me at a disadvantage if and when returning to the U.S. to work. You mentioned additional courses being required. How much additional training would then be required in the U.S.?
    Last edit by km05 on Dec 29, '05
  6. by   km05
    Quote from Silverdragon102
    If your husband is a EU immigrant you may find it easier to get a spousal work permit than someone who isn't
    Various of my husband's relatives are EU immigrants, but he isn't; he's South Asian. Which could be kind of helpful in a place such as Dubai, which is 50% Indian and Pakistani (and almost 90% international, overall).
  7. by   Silverdragon102
    Quote from km05
    No, actually, I’m quite well aware of the immigration requirements for programs such as the Skilled Worker Program in the U.K. and Canada – so I don’t see why you’re making the assumption I’m uninformed about the immigration process. (When talking about the process being more long-drawn-out, I was referring specifically to the three years of training - vs. just two - followed by the three years of professional job experience, as I indicated in my previous post.) So, my question remains: which countries would be willing to accept new nurses with no job experience? (I'm thinking this is more likely to be a place such as Dubai, since it's a very international city/emirate with about 90% of its residents on two- or three- year work visas - but at least a year or two of job experience is probably a standard requirement there, as well.)

    Silverdragon: Thanks for the helpful info! But what about all the budget cutbacks in the U.K.'s NHS and the newspaper article (did you post that link?) about newly trained nurses in the U.K. being unable to find work? Is it not as grim as such articles make it sound? I'm really interested in knowing since it's London where my husband has the most relatives, and that's his top choice so far. I realize the immigration process could take at least a few years, so your suggestion to get the nursing experience while waiting on the immigration paperwork is a good one.

    However, I didn't know that coming from the U.K. as a U.K.-trained nurse (with American citizenship) could put me at a disadvantage if and when returning to the U.S. to work. You mentioned additional courses being required. How much additional training would then be required in the U.S.?
    Suzanne was just making sure you are aware of immigration process you will be surprised how many post and haven't even made the effort to gain information themselves

    A good place to look and see what jobs are available are www.nursingtimes.net it is free to register and they do have lots of jobs. London is a very expensive place to live and you do as a nurse get paid a little extra to work there but it doesn't always cover all living expenses. I personally would look else where and travel to visit family. Holidays are plentyful in the UK on average a nurse would be looking atleast 25 days plus bank holidays (may even be more) I am not sure how easy it would be to immigrate with your husband not being EU but having your nursing degree would definately be a bonus. A lot of newly qualified nurses do struggle to find jobs but to be honest that has been the case for many years and there are always rumours of nurses struggling to find jobs but I think a lot has to do with a) willing to relocate b) determination to find a job

    Nurse training in the UK is now specialised and after roughly 18 months foundation course you branch off to specialised subjects either general adult, midwifery, mental health or paeds so unless you sort out hours in all these subjects before you start your training you will have to catch up on one or more before you will meet criteria to work in the US. Top up courses are not available in the UK unless you are doing a 18 month course after completion of training, you have to be sponsered from your work place and depending on how relevant it is to work place will depend whether you will get on course or not. You may be able to do catch up in the US but I believe it has to be accredited

    Most countries will ask for some level of experience


    Hope this helps
  8. by   km05
    Quote from Silverdragon102
    I personally would look else where and travel to visit family.
    Such as where? Just curious. Canada and Australia seem like much better possibilities than anywhere in Europe - at least, that's my impression (much higher immigration quotas, more space, more job opportunities, etc.) My husband prefers Europe because most of his friends and relatives are there. But then I started looking at Canada and Australia and found out they're probably much more viable options. (I'm not sure about emigrating or just being an international travel nurse - or accountant - for a while; I lived in mainland China a few different times for almost 2 years total several years ago, and I miss traveling and working overseas!)

    London and Dublin are always at the top of various 'costliest cities' surveys, so I didn't much like the idea of going to the U.K. Canada and Australia are not quite as expensive and always rank at the top of various international quality of life surveys.
  9. by   Silverdragon102
    Quote from km05
    Such as where? Just curious. Canada and Australia seem like much better possibilities than anywhere in Europe - at least, that's my impression (much higher immigration quotas, more space, more job opportunities, etc.) My husband prefers Europe because most of his friends and relatives are there. But then I started looking at Canada and Australia and found out they're probably much more viable options. (I'm not sure about emigrating or just being an international travel nurse - or accountant - for a while; I lived in mainland China a few different times for almost 2 years total several years ago, and I miss traveling and working overseas!)

    London and Dublin are always at the top of various 'costliest cities' surveys, so I didn't much like the idea of going to the U.K. Canada and Australia are not quite as expensive and always rank at the top of various international quality of life surveys.

    plenty of other places in the UK to live with easy travel round the country although trains are expensive. Most major cities have excellent training hospitals and offer same as London for much less. Canada you will have to pass their nursing exam not sure about Australia. I know UK has some sort of deal with UK and you just need to get your nursing assessed and usually quicker to get work permit. I know of several nurses going to Australia and have got everything sorted in 6 months and moved out. Not sure what work is available for accountants

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