In support of Associate Degree Nurses

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    US national nursing organizations are endorsing a joint statement supporting the Associate Degree of Nursing as an entry level of nursing along with the Baccalaureate Degree of Nursing due to the push for making the Baccalaureate degree the entry level. This endorsement includes a seamless transition to an advanced degree if the nurse wishes to do so.

    The "BSN in 2010" initiative did not occur as there are more Associate Degree Nurses than Baccalaureate Degree Nursing and community college and Associate Degree Nursing Organizations are pushing to maintain the Associate degree as an entry level of nursing. There has been much research on the need for all levels of nursing due to a projected nursing shortage within the next 10 -15 years due to retirement of the largest age group of nurses. The push for "Magnet Hospital" designation requires only Baccalaureate Nurses be hired which is restricting job placement for Associate Degree Nurses.

    I am interested in what the entry level is for other countries and if any other country is dealing with an entry level issue. I would appreciate any responses. Thank you.

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    While I am not extremely worried about this personally because I have already been out of work for a year and a half (long story), I do believe AAS Nurses should have a place in the workforce....ALL nurses and assistants are needed....Nurses Aides, LPN, AAS RN and BS RN's as well as Masters RN's....and, of course, Doctorates. I think there is a place for everyone!
    I have not read up on or heard of any recent pushes to make the entry level a BA or BSN...but will have to start reading recent articles.
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    UK is changing from degree or Diploma nurse training to BSN only and I think this is from next year. Canada although not sure on Quebec cos they do things differently nurse training is BSN
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    As you know in the US, the entry level training for RNs is all over the place so I don't have anything specific to add about that. Also, LVNs/LPNs are a separate nursing practice in the US; while some facilities aren't hiring LVNs/LPNs in favor of RNs, as far as I know there are no plans to do away with the LVN/LPN nurse anytime soon.

    I do have one thought on this...even if the US endorses ADNs along with BSNs as the minimum requirement for entry as a RN, that won't change the fact that a growing number of facilities--even non-Magnet facilities--prefer to hire BSNs for these positions.
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    Canada requires BSN as a minimum and it's the only option for RN education now.
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    Hi Meriwhen,

    As far as I know, there is no plan to do away with LPN/LVNs as they are needed for long term care and in doctor's offices.

    I don't know where you practice but I have done travel nursing along the East coast from NewYork to Florida and taught in both ADN and BSN programs and most of the hospitals prefer ADN nurses over BSN as they have more clinical experience and are more prepared to work after graduation. BSN nurses take much more time to orient before they are ready to work. I am very much in support of maintaining ADN and BSN entry levels. There is a place for both.
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    Quote from Cheryl Louise
    I don't know where you practice but I have done travel nursing along the East coast from NewYork to Florida and taught in both ADN and BSN programs and most of the hospitals prefer ADN nurses over BSN as they have more clinical experience and are more prepared to work after graduation. BSN nurses take much more time to orient before they are ready to work. I am very much in support of maintaining ADN and BSN entry levels. There is a place for both.
    Oh, I hear you: I currently hold an ADN myself and I see nothing wrong with it as an entry-level degree. But on the West Coast as well in the large metro areas back East where I'm from (NYC, Boston, DC, etc.), the push is for BSNs for entry level. In the last several new grad cohorts in my hospital chain--one of the largest in CA--the number of ADNs hired as new grads could be could be counted on one's fingers, and nearly all were already enrolled in RN-BSN or RN-MSN bridge programs. Also, out here, "BSN-preferred" is common to see outside of acute care as well. Again, ADNs can get hired--experience can make up for not having the desired degree--but it's not easy.

    It is clear that change is in the air, whether we like or agree with it :/
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    I agree with you on your statement: It is clear that change is in the air, whether we like or agree with it :/[/QUOTE]

    Nursing is know for change but the push for BSN entry level has been going on for decades and has been unsuccessful. Right now the IOM Report and hospital "Magnet" status is pushing the current change to "BSN by 2020". We'll see who wins this battle with the next projected "nursing shortage" by then!!!


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