LPN to RN

  1. Hi,

    I was just wondering if there are people on here that have started out as an LPN and completed the bridge-in to their RN? Where did you do your program and are you satisfied with being an RN as opposed to an LPN? I'm trying to get some feedback on either staying as an LPN or going on to being an RN. I'm going to be graduating as an LPN in June.....thanks!

    Kim
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  2. 31 Comments

  3. by   bizzymum919
    LPN's are getting phased out in many positions and they are mostly "grandfathering" the ones already on the units. If you want to specialize in a certain area it is best to go for your RN. I am going into the bridge program (LPN -RN) so that I will be more marketable. With a RN, or even in some cases a BSN, you can go anywhere and not really worry about qualifications.

  4. by   renunurse
    Is there going to be any further RPN..to RN bridging in southern Ontario?
  5. by   RPN04
    They (RPNAO) I think is now lobbying for that bridge. But if you're in ontario, u'll have to do the full 4 yrs presently, if u wanna become BScN. RN programs will no longer be in existance. BScN is the thing now.
  6. by   Tashia
    Okay, let me get this straight..

    What is the difference in going for your rn and a bsc? what were the qualifications for the rn? I thought they were the same? I am presently an rpn student and I might go for my rn after, (if the bridge comes by then then great!) but I just thought that you could only go for the bscN.


    Can someone explain the difference?
  7. by   Fiona59
    Take a deep breath. Some provinces still have community college diploma RN programmes. They can then tranfer into universities to complete two more years to do the BScN. Other provinces have eliminated the diploma RN completely. They "encourage" the RN's to obtain the BScN at their own expense and on their own time.

    Back in the '70's this whole thing started with the introduction of the BScN and the elimination of hospital training programmes. Then you have programmes that let anyone with a degree apply for an ascelerated BScN degree (yes, someone with a business degree or a degree in history can take this course and become a nurse). I worked once with one of these classes. The business degrees all wanted to go into hospital administration and the liberal arts degrees all wanted a "decent paying job" and one actually told me that "RN's don't do patient care thats what you LPN's are for"

    God help the future of Canada's nurses with attitudes like that.
  8. by   Tashia
    I have recently talked to a lady who talked to Centinnal College about their bridging program. She said it was just approved in October. So that is why not alot of people now about it. They will be starting in the Fall. The requirements are ...

    RPN Diploma and you have to have worked for a year.

    I asked if you need to have grade 12 in Biology and Chemistry and she said you do. She didn't know if you could go with less. Her school only takes gr.12 to get into the RPN program.
    She said that you have to have good marks. At least a B average. It's a 2 year program and she doesn't know how many people will be accepted. It might be hard to get in so you will probably have to have at least in the 90's to have a good chance of being accepted.
    Sorry this sounds like I'm rambling. I don't have a lot of time.
    Anyway I hope this helps at least a bit. You could give them a call. Their website will not have anything showing about it yet.

    ____________________
    RPN STUDENT
  9. by   Blackbird
    Hi there. I work under the Australian system which, I understand, is very different to the US system but I'll give you my take anyhow.

    Here, there are three types of nurses: assistant nurse (no qualifcation or Cert III in Community Services or Aged Care), enrolled nurse (Cert IV Community Services/Aged Care) and Registered Nurse (Bachelor of Nursing). The latter two are registered with the Nursing Board in that state or territory.

    I was recently accepted into an RN programme. It starts in March.
    However, on perusing my proposed programme, I sought an assistant nursing position to align my work with my studies. In doing so, I've just enrolled in a Cert III course and intend to progress to a Cert IV. By the time I commence uni studies, I will be almost through the Cert III course. Why? Because it's all practical based whereas my uni equivalent has virtually none. This is commonplace in RN programmes I have sighted and I don't think it's a good thing, personally.

    If you have the ability to do a uni course, by all means do so as the opportunities widen as your educational experience does.
  10. by   Tashia
    thanks for that info.
    actually, i'm from canada so the programs here and requirements are alot different than the u.s of a. it's intersting to know what other prople had to go about tho get their nursing diploma/certificate.

    if anyone would like some information concerning the bridge program at centinnal college in toronto i recently recieved some. just email me and i'll send it to you.
  11. by   Fiona59
    Funny isn't it how nursing around the world has different requirements. But then its like that across Canada. I've heard of schools that admit by highest grade point average and others admit first come with minimum marks. Some schools require Gr12, Bio, Chem and Math, while others accept Gr11, Math, Chem and Bio 12. My LPN had higher requirements than the RN program in the province I'm living in now.

    I had a friend who's Mum applied as a mature student and didn't make it as her marks were'nt high enough (mature students needed 65% per the calender but they were actually only accepting mature students with 75% due to competition), when they found out she was Metis she qualified for a seat in the University nursing school because they held seats for first nations students!

    Reading this board sometimes makes me laugh. The future nurses in the US seem to have it so much easier.

    Every student over 35yo in my LPN class had applied for the RN program at the local community college and was turned down. Not one dropped out or had to repeat a course. The rumour was that the director of nursing at that school felt we wouldn't be in nursing long enough to justify the expense of training us. More than one person heard the rumour and we could never have proven it. They also turned down alot of people who had English as a second language who they felt were not "proficient enough in spoken English" but had the marks. But we could all understand them when talking among ourselves outside the classroom. That year they had a very large class of 18 -20 yo blonde female nursing students (some of whom brought their parents to the interviews).
    Guess they didn't want mature, independent thinkers...
  12. by   Blackbird
    That year they had a very large class of 18 -20 yo blonde female nursing students (some of whom brought their parents to the interviews).
    Guess they didn't want mature, independent thinkers...

    Oooooeee! As if your presumption that US nurses have it easier or that a literate command of the English language rests only in the spoken word wasn't enough, I am DEFINITELY not touching that last derogatory statement!

    Mature, independent thinking indeed. :uhoh21:
  13. by   Fiona59
    Only telling you how it was.

    One student that was rejected was educated in Uganda, spoke English with an accent, had science marks in the high 80's and was told her spoken English wasn't good enough. She was also in my LPN course and graduated in the top 3.

    American nursing students have options that Canadians don't. Many hospitals in the US offer education in return for a specified number years employment there. The loans programs in the US have different payback schedules than Canada and different formats for obtaining them. All advanced courses in Canada have to be paid for by the nurse/student. Employers don't assist in any way. You want to change your RN into a BScN or your LPN into a BScN, they expect you to pay for it yourself, very little financial aide available. Often we have to leave our jobs and our incomes to obtain the education, loosing pensions and benefits. We don't have the options of classes on weekends and taking everything in the evenings, most classes are geared for full time during the day students.

    But I defer to your superior knowledge of what we see happening here...
  14. by   saskrn
    Quote from Fiona59
    Only telling you how it was.

    One student that was rejected was educated in Uganda, spoke English with an accent, had science marks in the high 80's and was told her spoken English wasn't good enough. She was also in my LPN course and graduated in the top 3.

    American nursing students have options that Canadians don't. Many hospitals in the US offer education in return for a specified number years employment there. The loans programs in the US have different payback schedules than Canada and different formats for obtaining them. All advanced courses in Canada have to be paid for by the nurse/student. Employers don't assist in any way. You want to change your RN into a BScN or your LPN into a BScN, they expect you to pay for it yourself, very little financial aide available. Often we have to leave our jobs and our incomes to obtain the education, loosing pensions and benefits. We don't have the options of classes on weekends and taking everything in the evenings, most classes are geared for full time during the day students.

    But I defer to your superior knowledge of what we see happening here...

    That actually isn't really accurate. My employer supports continuing education from both work and financial perspectives. They are very encouraging!

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