Is this a new concept?

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    I have found from my own expereince, if you want to specialize in nursing. It is better to start your nursing career in a large teaching centre. Why? Because community hospitals do not want to train their staff, it costs too much $$. You could be waiting years in a smaller centre to even get enough seniority to make the transfer, and that's if they even want to train you. You could be skipped over for not "possessing the qualifications," (ex. may require be 2-3yrs of expereince in that area) from the get go. When I first started off in a community hospital, all the new hires to their ICU were all from large teaching hospitals. Is this something that has been common knowledge for years? Or is this a newer phenomenon, a result of provincial restructuring and money allocation?

    When I talk to older nurses who work at community hospitals about career planning, they suggest to get your seniority in, then make the transfer to the area you want. But I am not sure this is the way anymore. Any thoughts, disagreements, or others with similar experiences?
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    From what I'm seeing lately, it's like a lottery. We have one manager who hires you if she thinks you'll fit in with her existing staff. Another who has been hiring her daughter's classmates.

    You can see where this is going. Grievances abound.

    Most staff are still of the mindset, do your time and transfer.

    Of course, if you have experience they can always use that to beat seniority clauses if it's a really specialized area.
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    I work in a community hospital ICU and I applied after working a year in general surgery. I found that in order to even get an interview I had to start a critical care course on my own initiative and at my own expense (through distance ed. so it wasn't that bad). So if you can afford to do this it might be a way to get your foot in the door (especially if you don't have a lot of seniority).
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    OPs, Thanks for your input. I was just wondering if: because a smaller hospital = smaller budget, it results in less money to train potential employees, and indirectly causes less chance of career advancement. Has anyone else noticed, if there was some sort of brain drain going on....or maybe its my complete misinterpretation of the facts.

    Also, another scenario moving in the other direction: smaller hospitals offer less full-time positions, and may lose employees to larger centres, were more chance of full-time positions exist. Resulting in more doors opening for career advancement, but at the cost of relocation.

    Either way, someones getting shafted, seems like its the smaller communities, unfortunately. I think things are really changing... (and at this point I am going to stop, before I lose track of where I am going with this post.)
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    In response to Fiona I have to add that I worked in a hospital where you had to know someone to get hired. But, everything being equal who would you sooner hire someone who has a known quality going to bat for them or someone who doesn't? I would opt for the person who has a known quality vouching for them.

    I like the programs here in Ontario, and I like the fact they are college based not hospital based. I spoke with a PA nurse recently. She told me that she had received a week of orientation during her ICU training at a hospital then let out. The training doesn't seem as standardized. I want to know prior to beginning any job in CCU that I know what I am doing, and I don't want to be intimidated by anyone. I think these programs, here in Ontario will make sure I know what I need to know, and that's worth the small cost of the program.
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    Quote from oneLoneNurse
    In response to Fiona I have to add that I worked in a hospital where you had to know someone to get hired. But, everything being equal who would you sooner hire someone who has a known quality going to bat for them or someone who doesn't? I would opt for the person who has a known quality vouching for them.

    I like the programs here in Ontario, and I like the fact they are college based not hospital based. I spoke with a PA nurse recently. She told me that she had received a week of orientation during her ICU training at a hospital then let out. The training doesn't seem as standardized. I want to know prior to beginning any job in CCU that I know what I am doing, and I don't want to be intimidated by anyone. I think these programs, here in Ontario will make sure I know what I need to know, and that's worth the small cost of the program.
    Uhm, no. Quite frankly it's been a disaster.

    One was terminated and escorted out of the building by security. Can't go into details because it was quite the termination out here. Another one lives in her own world. Doesn't think the rules apply to her and our Manager lets her get away with things the rest of us would have on our records. The third one worked three months and transferred to another unit after making it very clear she only came to us to get her foot in the door.

    These nurses have all been hired as casuals and cost a fortune to orientate. They then proceeded to work only Monday to Friday dayshifts and did nothing to alleviate our shortage on every other shift. I want to add that they got three or more months orientation where as in the rest of the hospital it's usually five shifts and learn as you go. Out of her last five hires, one was terminated, one transferred, one is moving to Ontario, one is working to expected level, and number five is just arriving. (This is just the LPNs, her hiring of RNs is just as bad; one was asked to rethink her nursing career and she left, she was dangerous and had no concept of patient care)

    It's caused a huge blow to unit morale and more than a few people are questioning the Unit Managers judgement. Whenever she hires we are waiting in fear to see who will arrive. The part timers are looking for new jobs and the full timers are fed up of showing people the ropes.

    Our Health Authority advertises fairness and equality in hiring. Yet, my UM goes against it constantly.
    Last edit by Fiona59 on Nov 15, '12
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    Good reply, thanks, Kevin
    Fiona59 likes this.


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