Immigration to Canada from the US--time frame question

  1. Hello,

    I am a BSN RN and am a US citizen working in Vermont. I want to immigrate to NS and eventually go for Canadian citizenship, after which I'll give up the US citizenship. My question is directed at other US citizens who have immigrated to Canada--what was the time frame between filing your immigration application and getting landing papers? How does an application as Provincial Nominee affect the overall time frame? I have a two year commitment to work here in Vermont before I will be free to move to NS and would like to time my application so that my landing papers will be approved (crossing my fingers) at about the same time as that commitment is fulfilled.

    Thank you all for any information.
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   gchelak
    Quote from CDN_NPtobe
    Hello,

    I am a BSN RN and am a US citizen working in Vermont. I want to immigrate to NS and eventually go for Canadian citizenship, after which I'll give up the US citizenship. My question is directed at other US citizens who have immigrated to Canada--what was the time frame between filing your immigration application and getting landing papers? How does an application as Provincial Nominee affect the overall time frame? I have a two year commitment to work here in Vermont before I will be free to move to NS and would like to time my application so that my landing papers will be approved (crossing my fingers) at about the same time as that commitment is fulfilled.

    Thank you all for any information.
    Does the US not allow dual citizenship? I am Canadian living in the US right now (just until I complete my ADN in 2005) and have been going through the process of US citizenship since Feb 2004 (our last swearing in ceremony is July 30, 2004). Canada doesn't care if you are dual - and I am doing it so I can work in the US if I ever need to in the future (I have a green card right now and it is more of a hassel to put it on hold than it is to get US citizenship). You shouldn't have to (nor should you want to) give up your natural citizenship. The US is full of opportunity and you never know when you might want to move back.
    I also had to have been here 5 years before I applied- I don't know if Canada has the same rule.
    Check out this web site http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/
    Good Luck!
  4. by   CDN_NPtobe
    Yes, the US does permit dual citizenship but I would prefer Canadian citizenship. You have to renounce one citizenship somewhere when it comes time to retire anyhow, as they obviously do not want people claiming retirement benefits in both countries.
  5. by   bizzymum919
    The US does NOT accept dual citizenship. The US is very nationalistic and when you apply for citizenship, they want you to renounce your former country. You can do it verbally, but it is not official until you write the governement of your former country. If you leave the US and take on citizenship of that country, you lose your American citizenship even if you were born and raised in the US.
    I am a dual citizen of the UK and US, but the US does not recognise the UK citizenship, but the UK recognises the US. I am looking to relocate to Canada also.
    I hear that British citizens get preferential treatment in regards to immigration since Canada used to be a colony of the UK. Is this still true?

  6. by   fergus51
    I have dual citizenship. As long as your country accepts dual citizenship (and Canada does) you don't have to renounce it to become a US citizen. I didn't.


    "In the U.S., new citizens have to forsake their previous national standing unless that country permits dual citizenship."
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/im...tizenship.html

    I have no idea if Brits are treated preferentially when applying for immigration to Canada. I personally doubt it. We are looking for education and job ability more than a certain nationality.
  7. by   fergus51
    Here's another link about dual citizenship requirements for the US. This issue got national attention in Canada when a Canadian/Syrian dual citizen was deported to Syria by the US and tortured.
    http://www.richw.org/dualcit/faq.html

    I was recently told by a US customs official that the US doesn't "recognize" dual citizenship. What gives?
    It depends on exactly what is meant by "recognizing" dual citizenship. If the official meant to say that dual US/other citizenship violates US law, he was, simply put, wrong. If he meant that foreign citizenship makes no difference under US law if one is also a US citizen, he was right.

    US citizenship law is primarily concerned with whether or not a given person holds US citizenship. If a person is a US citizen and is currently within the jurisdiction of the US, any other citizenship(s) he or she may hold are really not relevant in US law.

    A "dual citizen" has no special status in the US by virtue of holding citizenship in some other country too. In particular, if you are a dual citizen and get into some kind of legal trouble while in the US, you should not expect the US to acknowledge any efforts by consular officials of your other country of citizenship to intervene in your behalf.

    Also, when a "dual citizen" enters the US, he/she is expected to identify himself to US immigration and customs officials as a US citizen (not as a citizen of some other country) -- and in cases where a passport is required to enter the US, a dual US/other citizen is expected to enter on a US passport, just like any other US citizen.

    I've heard of recent cases where dual US/other citizens briefly got into sticky situations while entering the US, when they attempted to identify themselves either as "dual" citizens or as citizens of another country. In former times (before the latest round of State Department policy reforms), attempting to enter the US on a foreign passport could even be used as "evidence" of intent to relinquish US citizenship. Although this apparently isn't a danger any more, the best thing to do is probably to make life simple and assert only your US citizenship rights when entering the US.

    Remember that US immigration officers are primarily interested in determining whether a person wishing to enter the US should be let in. If you hold US citizenship, then you have a legal right to enter, remain in, and work in the US. Holding some other citizenship as well as US citizenship is completely irrelevant in this case, and if you make an issue of holding a second citizenship, you're just making it more likely that US officials will think something is amiss.
    Last edit by fergus51 on Aug 4, '04
  8. by   gchelak
    Quote from fergus51
    Here's another link about dual citizenship requirements for the US. This issue got national attention in Canada when a Canadian/Syrian dual citizen was deported to Syria by the US and tortured.
    http://www.richw.org/dualcit/faq.html

    I was recently told by a US customs official that the US doesn't "recognize" dual citizenship. What gives?
    It depends on exactly what is meant by "recognizing" dual citizenship. If the official meant to say that dual US/other citizenship violates US law, he was, simply put, wrong. If he meant that foreign citizenship makes no difference under US law if one is also a US citizen, he was right.

    US citizenship law is primarily concerned with whether or not a given person holds US citizenship. If a person is a US citizen and is currently within the jurisdiction of the US, any other citizenship(s) he or she may hold are really not relevant in US law.

    A "dual citizen" has no special status in the US by virtue of holding citizenship in some other country too. In particular, if you are a dual citizen and get into some kind of legal trouble while in the US, you should not expect the US to acknowledge any efforts by consular officials of your other country of citizenship to intervene in your behalf.

    Also, when a "dual citizen" enters the US, he/she is expected to identify himself to US immigration and customs officials as a US citizen (not as a citizen of some other country) -- and in cases where a passport is required to enter the US, a dual US/other citizen is expected to enter on a US passport, just like any other US citizen.

    I've heard of recent cases where dual US/other citizens briefly got into sticky situations while entering the US, when they attempted to identify themselves either as "dual" citizens or as citizens of another country. In former times (before the latest round of State Department policy reforms), attempting to enter the US on a foreign passport could even be used as "evidence" of intent to relinquish US citizenship. Although this apparently isn't a danger any more, the best thing to do is probably to make life simple and assert only your US citizenship rights when entering the US.

    Remember that US immigration officers are primarily interested in determining whether a person wishing to enter the US should be let in. If you hold US citizenship, then you have a legal right to enter, remain in, and work in the US. Holding some other citizenship as well as US citizenship is completely irrelevant in this case, and if you make an issue of holding a second citizenship, you're just making it more likely that US officials will think something is amiss.
    It is true- the US does NOT recognise dual - much like S Korea and other countries, but Canada does - you are Canadian whether or not you become a US citizen, but it does not work the other way around.
    I am not sure how the immigration goes in Canada since I was born there- but it only took 5 months here from papersork to swearing in to get the US citizenship. I am sure there are other things involved that we do not know about when being a dual citizen like dual taxes etc.
    Gail
  9. by   fergus51
    Quote from gchelak
    It is true- the US does NOT recognise dual - much like S Korea and other countries, but Canada does - you are Canadian whether or not you become a US citizen, but it does not work the other way around.
    I am not sure how the immigration goes in Canada since I was born there- but it only took 5 months here from papersork to swearing in to get the US citizenship. I am sure there are other things involved that we do not know about when being a dual citizen like dual taxes etc.
    Gail
    Not recognizing dual citizenship for the purposes of law is not the same as not being allowed to have dual citizenship. The US will still recognize you as a US citizen even if you get Canadian citizenship. And Canadians don't have to give up Canadian citizenship to get US citizenship (the oath you are required to take is not binding and their policy is to not force the issue).

    When people say the US doesn't recognize dual citizenship, they imply that you can't become a US citizen unless you get rid of your other citizenship or that Americans who become citizens of other countries lose their American citizenship. That is not the case. All it means is that all US citizens regardless of other nationalities, will be considered the same by the US government (you won't get any special treatment for also having citizenship of Canada or the UK or whatever). Same goes if you get Canadian citizenship as an American. You can't say... avoid the draft by claiming to be a Canadian citizen. They consider you an American period, no matter what passports you have.
    Last edit by fergus51 on Aug 4, '04
  10. by   gchelak
    Quote from fergus51
    Not recognizing dual citizenship for the purposes of law is not the same as not being allowed to have dual citizenship. The US will still recognize you as a US citizen even if you get Canadian citizenship. And Canadians don't have to give up Canadian citizenship to get US citizenship (the oath you are required to take is not binding and their policy is to not force the issue).

    When people say the US doesn't recognize dual citizenship, they imply that you can't become a US citizen unless you get rid of your other citizenship or that Americans who become citizens of other countries lose their American citizenship. That is not the case. All it means is that all US citizens regardless of other nationalities, will be considered the same by the US government (you won't get any special treatment for also having citizenship of Canada or the UK or whatever). Same goes if you get Canadian citizenship as an American. You can't say... avoid the draft by claiming to be a Canadian citizen. They consider you an American period, no matter what passports you have.
    Thanks for clarifying that- this is all really confusing.
  11. by   fergus51
    Here you go, from the horse's mouth so to speak. This applies to US citizens who become Canadians and other nations. Immigration laws are extremely confusing. We went through so many hoops to become citizens and my mom was very concerned about dual nationality for us kids and my stepfather. He was able to get Canadian citizenship and we were able to get American citizenship, but we were informed that while in Canada we were considered Canadians only and while in America we were considered Americans only. VERY confusing, but I'm very glad to have dual citizenship.

    http://usembassy.state.gov/seoul/wwwh3002.html
    Loss of U.S. Citizenship

    The automatic acquisition or retention of a foreign nationality does not affect U.S. citizenship; however, the acquisition of a foreign nationality upon one's own application may cause loss of U.S. citizenship under Section 349(a)(1) of the Immigration and Naturalization Act (8 U.S.C. 1481). In order for loss of nationality to occur under Section 349(a)(1), it must be established that the naturalization was obtained with the intention of relinquishing U.S. citizenship. Such an intention may be shown by a person's statements or conduct. If the U.S. Government is unable to prove that the person had such an intention when applying for and obtaining the foreign citizenship, the person will have both nationalities.
    Last edit by fergus51 on Aug 4, '04
  12. by   jamx551
    Hi

    Im know this is not the right thread but I can see that people are knowledgeable in my issue

    Im from the Philippines and my wife (principal applicant) is currently applying as immigrant for the US. So I fall as a dependent. We presently are just waiting for an interview at the US embassy.

    However prior to my wife's US application, I have a pending application as Immigrant to Canada. In this case I am the principal applicant and my wife is a dependent. My case book is already filed at the Canadian embassy but I keep receiving mails from the Canadian Embassy that I need to update my forms, certificates etc. for my application to move forward. But since my wife has applied for the US I just ignored the letters from the canadian embassy because I decided not to continue with it anymore but chose to work on that US immigration instead..

    But our US application has been delayed due to retrogression of visas, I now think of continuing my application for Canada since I thought that maybe we would leave for Canada faster than US.

    So my question is.. Is this what Im planning legal for both US and Canadian Immigration laws? Or is this possible to have both US and canadian Immigration application?

    Pls let me know.. I eagerly wait for right and clear answers..

    I also posted this in a new thread here...

    http://allnurses.com/forums/f235/pos...ml#post1493871

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