Are there still jobs for nurses in Canada? - page 3

Hey I'm new to this and not starting school until Sept '04 and hope to get a BSN. What I am wondering is if Canada is still in need of nurses because you sure don't hear about it anymore. Where you... Read More

  1. by   betsy1963
    Quote from oneLoneNurse
    Question: is there one bargaining unit for nurses in Ontario ? Couldn't you live very, very well in London on $38.00 vs Toronto ?
    ONA is the main bargaining unit for nurses, but there are others. Those of us who live in rural areas live well on what we make compared to Toronto, but how would you draw the line otherwise? Wages are bargained centrally.
  2. by   fergus51
    That's why I left Toronto. You can't have the same standard of living in Toronto on the same wages as in Peterborough. It's a shame we don't have any cost of living adjustments like they do in the UK.
  3. by   oneLoneNurse
    wages in Peterborough wouldn't Peterborough have a hard time attracting nurses ?

    Quote from fergus51
    That's why I left Toronto. You can't have the same standard of living in Toronto on the same wages as in Peterborough. It's a shame we don't have any cost of living adjustments like they do in the UK.
  4. by   fergus51
    I don't think they would have trouble getting staff because most nurses do consider cost of living and not just hourly wage. I also don't think they should lower the wages in Peterborough, just include a cost of living adjustment for those in expensive areas. My rent for a TINY appartment in a not so nice area of Toronto was the same as my friend's mortgage payment for a house in Peterborough. Pretty much every other job bases their payscale partly on the cost of living in the area and I know many northern positions include bonuses for that reason too. It makes no sense to pay people the same amount when the cost of living is completely different. You don't see that happening in the US do ya? If you come down here you make more money in San Francisco than you would in Redding.
    Last edit by fergus51 on Jan 18, '05
  5. by   lalaxton
    Quote from oneLoneNurse
    Question: is there one bargaining unit for nurses in Ontario ? Couldn't you live very, very well in London on $38.00 vs Toronto ?
    It is cheaper to live outside Toronto. ONA is the one bargaining unit in Ontario. Salaries are negotiated on a province wide level I believe.
  6. by   Never_too_late
    Quote from mikaela
    Hi, All:

    [snip]

    As to the prospect of getting a job after graduation, the posts are quite scary. It's not only through this discussion, did I learn about nurses having difficulty landing in a full time job in Ontario, but other sources too. A front page story in a news magazine also proved this point. What confuses me is, why do schools (of course for profit purposes) and the media SEEM TO CAPITALIZE on the so-called nursing shortage. If the real situation says otherwise, I feel only pity for people getting in to the program, including myself ,and later learn that there's no job for them. Going through the nursing program is costly -- not just in terms of money, but also time and effort.

    So, could anybody tell me what's the real situation 3-5 years from now? I know that the market for RNs differs from RPNs. But, generally, what is the real score? Is there somebody here affiliated with any nurses' association? What is the job forecast? How SINCERE is the government with its efforts to strenghten the healthcare system?

    The aging population is a fact, but the need for more nurses -- is it a MYTH or a FACT ?

    Will appreciate your inputs.

    Thanks,

    Its funny because our teachers tell us that we will barely have time to put down our pens when writing our last exam before hospitals grab us. That is what the situation is like..we are told.

    I am in Montreal, Quebec and english and french hospitals work differently. In the french sector, you apply for A position and live with that until you have enough seniority but you will find work. So you might work the night shift for 10 years. In the english sector, you are on rotation all through your career (N-D-E), shifts are 12 hours so you get lots of days off. I think this is good for me. I am a part-time patient care attendant while I study and when I went to HR to sign my hiring papers they said: "..and when you are a nurse your pay will become x$ an hour and..."". For them, it is a given I will hang around and work there.

    Finally, for years, positions required university degrees. Now, with the shortages, most jobs require a university degree OR a DEC with experience OR just a DEC. I think this is also indicative of the shortages and the 'compromises' hospitals are willing to make to get nurses.

    Anyway, my 0.02.

    N_T_L

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