Starting IV tricks

  1. As a new grad, I am trying to get experience trying to start IV's myself before automatically calling IV therapy. I've noticed that some nurses on my floor won't even attempt to try it. This is a skill that one day I hope to master. However, I keep finding that I either go to deep or not deep enough when trying to insert the catheter. Can anyone give me any advice? Any other tricks on other aspects of starting IV's would be helpful, also. Thanks!

    :roll
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  2. 21 Comments

  3. by   RainbowzLPN
    Tory, I have a link to a site about starting IV's, if you'd like it, I can email it to you.
  4. by   LilgirlRN
  5. by   trauma91166
    i have found that holding your angio a little less than flush with the skin and inserting the needle just in front of the the intended vein works best for me. good luck!
  6. by   Irwin0111
    the only one technique that i used is. just after you you had made to puncture the vein with the needle nothing has remained for a reason to have any further use of it. so make a hold of the canulla. before any move of advancing any deeper pull the needle just half and make your way of advancing completely.
    multiple puncturing of the vein is most likely if you still attempt to or make your way of advancing deeper or further into the vein if you fail to retract or pull the needle after you made to hit an opening for the insertion. for that resulting bulge is what you usually get.
    kiwit
  7. by   PICC CHICK
    I think its great you want to master the skill. Attempt ALL sticks, the more you do the better you will become. If you are unable to get after the second stick, call the IV team and watch them place the IV or have them watch you attempt placement. They are your best resource for helping you.
  8. by   renerian
    I go in on the top and that works for me. Alot of people go in on the side and I cannot do that.

    renerian
  9. by   neneRN
    If pt is a bad stick, use a manual BP cuff and inflate to diastolic pressure rather than using the tourniquet- it always amazes me what will pop up when I try this- can usually find something to stick.
  10. by   VivaLasViejas
    I use warm packs (wet towels wrapped in a plastic bag) to make the veins stand out, or at the very least warm the extremity and make them easier to see and access. I also use SQ lidocaine at the intended site, which can distort the vein somewhat, but makes the start MUCH more comfortable for the patient and creates a landmark for the "stick".
  11. by   ginger58
    Quote from Tory
    As a new grad, I am trying to get experience trying to start IV's myself before automatically calling IV therapy. I've noticed that some nurses on my floor won't even attempt to try it. This is a skill that one day I hope to master. However, I keep finding that I either go to deep or not deep enough when trying to insert the catheter. Can anyone give me any advice? Any other tricks on other aspects of starting IV's would be helpful, also. Thanks!
    If veins aren't just popping out I wrap the arm in a warm blanket and have the pt hang their arm down in a dependent position to help the veins fill.
  12. by   vamedic4
    http://allnurses.com/forums/f95/peds...ight=Peds+tips

    maybe this'll help you too....

    just a thought.

    vamedic4
    off in 53 minutes.
  13. by   vamedic4
    Another thing I just thought of...the use of 2 tourniquets, one distal to the intended site, the other proximal to it...has worked for me in the past on kiddos who haven't been very forthcoming with their veins.


    Good luck!!

    vamedic4
    Off in 51 minutes now!!:wink2:
  14. by   Mandolyn
    Starting an IV is something that gets better only by experience, so it is good to attempt them yourself first. It is the only way to master the skill.
    Some tips...Do not slap the vein. If you are a new grad, I am sure you learned this but I have seen so many still doing it. Gently tap or rub the vein to get it to stand up.
    Also, anchor the vein well to prevent it from rolling. Go in at only a slight angle, as soon as you get your flash of blood, drop your cath down parallel with the skin, insert just a touch more and then push off the cath.
    Go in with confidence....try not to be unsure of yourself because that is where you will miss. Be sure of the vein you chose, feel for the bounce and don't leave the tourniquet on too long.
    Good luck to you.

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