Status of LPNs in IL?

  1. 0
    In my CNA class, we had a student from a different class sit in for a make-up. During lunch he told us his teacher said Illinois is doing away with LPNs at the end of this year and all LPNs must either become RNs or they will be downgraded to CNA. I can only imagine his teacher misinformed them or he did not understand what she said, but since he is already an EMT, I am not just dismissing this. I researched the web and looked through the state website but didn't see any information that reflected this. It seems to me like all nursing homes would have to close down if they did this, but then again there are some states that have higher levels of CNA that do a lot of what an LPN does, esp. medication dispensing. Anyone else heard anything like this???
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  3. 12 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I don't work withLPNs but I haven't heard of this.
  5. 0
    This rumor has been going on for many years in all states..
  6. 0
    The Rumor That Wouldn't Die ...
  7. 2
    I did read that Illinois was considering this (though I'm vague on the source, I believe it may have been from the quarterly illinois nursing paper I get)...though if memory serves, it would be for future LPN's and they would be given 10 years to complete their RN. Current working LPN's would be grandfathered and be able to continue practicing (as I understood it). I can't promise my memory is accurate, but I thought they were on the fence about the concept primarily because of the need for more nursing schools and more benefits that encourage LPN's to return for the RN (i.e. incentive programs at your place of employment). Considering the shortage of nurses and the already limited acceptance rate of current programs, it's not the most ideal scenario to be considering. The article did not sound like Illinois was close to making a decision though.
    winniecooper and chicagonurse2b like this.
  8. 0
    Quote from LPNsimbi
    I did read that Illinois was considering this (though I'm vague on the source, I believe it may have been from the quarterly illinois nursing paper I get)...though if memory serves, it would be for future LPN's and they would be given 10 years to complete their RN. Current working LPN's would be grandfathered and be able to continue practicing (as I understood it). I can't promise my memory is accurate, but I thought they were on the fence about the concept primarily because of the need for more nursing schools and more benefits that encourage LPN's to return for the RN (i.e. incentive programs at your place of employment). Considering the shortage of nurses and the already limited acceptance rate of current programs, it's not the most ideal scenario to be considering. The article did not sound like Illinois was close to making a decision though.
    Thank you for the great information. I'm glad they weren't thinking of just doing away with LPN programs because that's all I can really afford right now.
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    I think too you must consider any source as not the most reliable unless its IDPH.

    However, I do want to clarify - that there is NO NURSING SHORTAGE at least in IL.

    There is thread after thread devoted to "where can I find a job, I'll work anywhere" type of requests.

    I live in central IL and there are few to no jobs even for very experienced RNs. Everyone is making due with less and less staffing.

    Do your research prior to committing time, money and lots of effort to training for a new job only to be frustrated once you graduate.
  10. 1
    Quote from traumaRUs
    I think too you must consider any source as not the most reliable unless its IDPH.

    However, I do want to clarify - that there is NO NURSING SHORTAGE at least in IL.

    There is thread after thread devoted to "where can I find a job, I'll work anywhere" type of requests.

    I live in central IL and there are few to no jobs even for very experienced RNs. Everyone is making due with less and less staffing.

    Do your research prior to committing time, money and lots of effort to training for a new job only to be frustrated once you graduate.
    Yes, I have seen this all over. For many years I didn't know what I wanted to do, but now my heart is set on nursing. If it's what you really want to do and you've tried other things, then I guess all you can do is pursue it and hope for the best. Even if I have to work as a CNA until I find an LPN job, so be it. I think I'll still feel good to be moving. I learned from my last job not to stay stagnant. You always have to keep bettering yourself.
    traumaRUs likes this.
  11. 1
    You could also try to get certifications to make yourself more desirable if you have difficulty obtaining a job, or even try to just focus on attending seminars in specific areas of nursing. You can get RAC-CT, restorative certification, or even focus on areas such as wound care. I've been fortunate in that I have not ever had trouble finding a nursing position, though I think the first nursing job is probably always the most difficult just from lack of experience. I remember networking for a job months before I graduated from nursing school. My first employer held a position for me for 3 months (as I had to graduate AND move to a new area) and they also allowed me to work license-pending for a month. Maybe I just got lucky if others are having so much trouble.
    winniecooper likes this.
  12. 0
    Quote from LPNsimbi
    You could also try to get certifications to make yourself more desirable if you have difficulty obtaining a job, or even try to just focus on attending seminars in specific areas of nursing. You can get RAC-CT, restorative certification, or even focus on areas such as wound care. I've been fortunate in that I have not ever had trouble finding a nursing position, though I think the first nursing job is probably always the most difficult just from lack of experience. I remember networking for a job months before I graduated from nursing school. My first employer held a position for me for 3 months (as I had to graduate AND move to a new area) and they also allowed me to work license-pending for a month. Maybe I just got lucky if others are having so much trouble.
    Thanks for all the good info. Can you focus on areas while you're going to school and if so, how? All the programs I've seen have a set course list so just wondering how you can focus on areas if you're just in school.


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