LPNs/LVNs working in Chicago hospitals

  1. 0
    I'm trying to decide if I should become an LPN/LVN.

    I live in Naperville, Illinois and know that I only want to work in a hospital setting in either Chicago or in or around Naperville.

    I'm doing a bit of research before making the financial and time commitment. If you feel comfortable answering these questions, I would love to hear back from you.

    Do you work in a hospital? Which one? How many years of experience do you have? What is your hourly wage or annual salary? Do you like where you work? Does your hospital offer its part-time LPNs/LVNs full benefits (such as medical coverage)?

    Thanks so much for your time. Your answsers will help me decide if I will go forward. I'm just beginning my CNA course the day after tomorrow.

    ++

    Chris

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  3. 10 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Moved to the Illinois Nursing forum with the ultimate goal of accruing more replies.
  5. 0
    Was just looking through the forums and came across your post. First off, getting your LPN is a great idea, it is a way to get your foot into the nursing door and make good money and gain experience. I recently moved to the Chicago area and work for a nursing agency for three different hospitals. The first thing I can tell you and this is not to disgourage you is that you will most likely not land a hospital job right out of school nor do you really want one. It is a very hectic place with a lot of responsibility and if you are not comfortable in the setting fluently then you will have more problems than you can deal with. Most likely you will start off in a nursing home or clinic. Don't feel bad, it is where the majority of nurses have to start out. Currently working agency I make 32/ hour but from what I understand and the other things I have looked at I am at the high end of the pay scale. Most everything else I have looked at has been roughly 22 - 28 but mind you this is agency. Which is a great option after you have about a year under your belt. I am not sure what in house pays but i am sure it is probly around the 20 - 24 range. Anyway, I just wanted to give you a bit of information. Not to discourage like I said but just so you don't walk into it with expectations that just arn't realistic. The nursing field is great, and with an LPN you can easily go back to get your ADN in about 3 semesters. Hope this helps and good luck.

    just to answer the specifics:

    I work for a group of hospitals in and around chicago
    I have 3 years experience through civilian and military outlets
    Working agency you have the option to buy benefits but most hospitals do offer benefits. Nursing homes on the otherhand I am not quite sure.
    I really do like the work, and it is work.
  6. 0
    Chicago area hospitals do not hire LPN's/LVN's to work in the hospital. I have to disagree with the above posted though- I think it's important to work in an acute setting (be it LTC acute or hospital) out of school as you will gain the most experience this way. Home Health is great but it's not going to offer you the same level of experience as being in a hospital or nursing home.

    If you don't want to work in a nursing home, clinic, va etc then I would suggest going straight for RN. If you don't mid the above places then LPN is a great start. I'm getting close to graduating with my LPN and I'll work for about a year to gain experience and hopefully bridge into an RN.
  7. 1
    Chicago hospitals do hire LPN's. I am an LPN and I work in a hospital, on the floor covering 7-9 patients with RN coverage in a respiratory hospital where 90% of patients are on vents. Hospitals do offer great learning environments but when it is just two nurses to 16 patients I would not want to be the RN who has to work with a new grad and the hospital setting was your first job.
    2011NursingStudent likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from flow.of.traffic
    Chicago hospitals do hire LPN's. I am an LPN and I work in a hospital, on the floor covering 7-9 patients with RN coverage in a respiratory hospital where 90% of patients are on vents. Hospitals do offer great learning environments but when it is just two nurses to 16 patients I would not want to be the RN who has to work with a new grad and the hospital setting was your first job.

    I'm confused. Do you work for a hospital or a nursing agency? If you work as LPN thru an agency at a hospital that is a different thing then being hired on as an LPN in a hospital. Yes, there are still LPNS in hospitals but they have been grandfathered in. If you don't mind posting what hospitals are you working at that hire LPN"s? This question has been posted numerous times in this forum and the answer has always been the same. Chicago area hospitals do not hire LPNS. Since I would love to work in a hospital right out of school (in June) would you mind posting where- I'm sure there's plenty of Lpn's in the same situation as I am.
  9. 0
    Quote from flow.of.traffic
    Chicago hospitals do hire LPN's. I am an LPN and I work in a hospital, on the floor covering 7-9 patients with RN coverage in a respiratory hospital where 90% of patients are on vents. Hospitals do offer great learning environments but when it is just two nurses to 16 patients I would not want to be the RN who has to work with a new grad and the hospital setting was your first job.

    I just noticed your statement about a resp. Hospital. Is it considered an acute LTC? Such as what Kidred offers? Actue LTC do hire LPNS as do the VA hospitals- but facilities such as Northwestern, UIC, Rush, Christ do not...from my understanding/research.
  10. 0
    Quote from eddie1
    I'm confused. Do you work for a hospital or a nursing agency? If you work as LPN thru an agency at a hospital that is a different thing then being hired on as an LPN in a hospital. Yes, there are still LPNS in hospitals but they have been grandfathered in. If you don't mind posting what hospitals are you working at that hire LPN"s? This question has been posted numerous times in this forum and the answer has always been the same. Chicago area hospitals do not hire LPNS. Since I would love to work in a hospital right out of school (in June) would you mind posting where- I'm sure there's plenty of Lpn's in the same situation as I am.
    Typically they dont hire LPN's anymore, but this LPN where my mom works at have been offered a postion at Mount Sinai. For the most part they are phasing LPN's out of the hospital and are strictly using RN's and CNA's because RN's can do much more than the LPN's and the CNA's can do what the LPN's do for less money.
  11. 2
    Sorry to disagree...CNAs typically have an 8 week program with minimal nursing education..the State of Illinois requires they only know how to do 21 different things (transferring, bathing)..see the website Illinois Nurse Aide Testing - Performance Skills Videos for Illinois list of CNA skills. CNAs are taught very little assessment skills, nor can they pass meds, give injections, regulate IVs, insert NG tubes as a LPN does. Those things simply are not in the list of skills a CNA is taught in Illinois.
    Some hospitals do hire LPNs and some do not. The differing factor probably is whether or not the hospital is seeking "Magnet Status". To acquire Magnet Status on of the requirements is an all RN staff...which, unfortunately does not mean only RNs work there...Magnet Hospitals also hire Nurse Assistants which they might call CNAs, PCTs or by some other title.
    Currently, because of the economy, it is very difficult to get into a ADN program...many people applying into the ADN programs have degrees in other fields, some even Masters Degrees, and because of job shortages are now going back to school for nursing..so competition for spots in the ADN programs is tough. It might be easier to get into a LPN program right now than it would be to get into an ADN program. If you live in Naperville you are in DuPage County and the College of DuPage does offer a 1 year LPN program. They only accept 40 students into the program a year. The 2011 semester starts January and that class is full. If you wish to get into the 2012 class begin applying right now (Dec 2010) because they decide on the final 40 LPN candidates about 6 months before the class begins. So apply early.
    College of DuPage also has a ADN program which accepts about 30 or so students a year only....and while it is a good program, they are not currently an accreteded (sorry about the misspelling) school. Your other choice of Community school is Elgin Community College which is in Kane County. They have a RN (ADN) program (no specific LPN program) however students can take the LPN exam after completing the first year of the program. Their admission too, is very limited, probably also about 30 to 40 students a year.
    Contrary to what a few others have said, there are currently only a few "Bridge Programs" for LPN to RN...some are currently "on hold" for applicants because most only accept an applicant if someone drops out of the second year of their ADN program..so spots are rare indeed. There is only one on-line LPN to RN program in the Midwest right now..and it is located in Indiana. So there are really not that many 'Bridge Programs" out there at this time. (I have been researching this topic for some of my students recently)
    There are also 4 programs in Illinois that offer an entry level Masters Degree program to persons that have a College Degree in other fields. After these students complete the Masters Program then they take the Illinois state test for RN licensure. (UIC: RUSH; MIllikin; an West Suburban--although I could not find the specific info on West Suburban's web site--so I'm not sure if their Masters entry level program still exists).
    Of course, there are also some private schools out there that have both LPN programs and/or RN programs available.
    As for jobs for LPN, although it may be difficult to find a LPN job at a Hospital, there are a few still out there. If you are looking for experience related to acuity of care, your best bet might be in a Skilled Care unit. Some Skilled Care units have IV's, NG tubes, dialysis patients, post op heart surg patients etc...
    Good Luck. Hope the info has helped a bit.
    2011NursingStudent and gonzo1224 like this.
  12. 0
    I work for two major hospitals here in chicago and I have been a LPN for 3 years. For me the lpn route was the best way to go because I get clinical experience,earn great money while I finish my RN/BSN. I was even hired at one of the hospitals right out of nursing school because I worked for a good hospital as a CNA for 2 years.

    Good luck


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