New cna and a hospice agency

  1. 0
    Hospice was the last thing on my dream list when it came to nursing. In the cna course I just finished, we watched a video about a dying woman's journey with hospice in her final months.

    It struck a cord I didn't know existed.

    This weekend I'm taking my cna board exam and my clinical instructor told me to call her when I pass the test. She is the chief administrator for a hospice agency in my area. I am assuming she wants to offer me a position. (she stated before that she only hires cnas from this particular program)

    As a new cna (soon to be RN student) what do I need to know? What should I anticipate? Any kid words of encouragement or tips would be so appreciated.


    Thx
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  4. 9 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    Congrats first on completing your CNA course. Second here is the job description from the local hospice near where I am at. This should give you some ideas on what is expected and the type of work that a hospice CNA does.

    Certified Nurse Assistant is functioning under direct and indirect supervision of the registered nurse. Provides personal care to the patient and assists with activities of daily living in the patient's home.CNA job description is very similar to that of a HHA but with a requirement to have a CNA certificate issued from the state. CNAs are allowed to work in Nursing Homes.

    Duties and Responsibilities

    1. Performs or assist patients with tub/shower/bath, complete/partial bed bath, personal care, skin care, nail care, hair care, foot care and oral hygiene.
    2. Assists with light housekeeping, laundry and change of bed linens.
    3. Assists with range of motion exercises, positioning, transfers, ambulating, and activity as directed by the registered nurse or therapist.
    4. Takes and records pulse, respiration and the temperature. Records on the home health aid clinical note each visit.
    5. Assists patients with administration of medications, which are ordinarily self-administered.
    6. Assists patient or caregiver with the use of Hoyer lift, commode, bedpan, urinal, heelchair, hospital bed and other equipment as directed by registered nurse or therapist. Reports defective equipment.
    7. Shops for groceries and prepares nutritionally balanced meals and snacks including special diets when required and ordered by physician.
    8. Cleanses, removes, and replaces colostomy or ureterostomy bag.
    9. Reinforces simple dressings.
    10. Records patient's health status and services provided each visit in an informative and descriptive manner.
    11. Immediately reports all changes in the patient's condition, all accidents and incidents to the Nursing Supervisor.
    12. Attends and participates in all scheduled training and educational programs offered by the agency.
    13. Follows established Infection Control and Universal Precautions policies and procedures when performing daily tasks.
    14. Reports any contagious diseases that come in contact with to Nursing Supervisor.
    15. Maintains confidentiality of all patients.
    16. Reports all complaints and grievances made by the patient to the Nursing Supervisor.
    17. Treats all patients fairly, with kindness, dignity and respect.
    18. Assists patients to achieve maximum independence in their activities of daily living and promotes optimal well being for the patient through maintaining a clean, safe, and healthy environment.
  6. 0
    Thanks for the reply! Do you think hospice would be ok as a first cna job? Or does it seem a bit heavy?
  7. 1
    Congratulations on becoming a CNA. I have only been in hospice since last October, but from what I have seen, the most important thing to do is to make the patient happy. It's the little things that seem to matter most, I have had patient's families thank me from the bottom of their hearts that a CNA gave their loved one a complete bed bath or painted their fingernails. It might not seem like much to give someone a good bed bath but it really is. Sometimes that is what they remember most fondly about the hospice care, the care that was given to them by the CNA. And no I don't think it's a bad first job, I think that hospice care is wonderful for the most part, the job entails meeting wonderful people and letting them direct the kind of care they want to receive at the end of their lives. It is a wonderful thing to be able to be with them and help them in their final days.
    hgrimmett likes this.
  8. 0
    I started out in home care and my clients for the most part have been hospice. I like working with end of life clients, hospice nurses and the family. I use a lot of the skills one would use in a facility. The nurses are great and will teach anything I don't know.
    One thing I notice, end of life clients usually get skin breakdown, not matter how good the care. This can be a source of pain requiring pain management, and wound care of course. I report all changes to the nurse.
    I encourage family to contact nursing with questions.
    I would ask how to handle the client expiring. Iv'e been on shift 3 or 4 times when the client passed away, it seems to happen a lot.
    I strive to be as positive and empathetic as possible. We all have to die some day and hopefully we will have warm, caring people with us.
    Good luck with your career(s).
  9. 0
    Thanks for the reply Tom.
  10. 0
    I am at 50 starting yet a new career. I really feel in my heart that a Hospice CNA is for me. I am starting my Patients Tech I classes on January 28th and I am a little nervous about going back to school at this late time in my life. I am a very confident person and know I will do GREAT with whatever I put my heart into. I have had a lot of personal experience with HOSPICE with various family members and have had some great experiences. I think I would be very good at it and have had several people tell me that I am choosing the right path.

    Is there a difference between home-health hospice and a facility hospice? I really like the one-on-one patient contact.
  11. 1
    Quote from kbkutlik
    I am at 50 starting yet a new career. I really feel in my heart that a Hospice CNA is for me. I am starting my Patients Tech I classes on January 28th and I am a little nervous about going back to school at this late time in my life. I am a very confident person and know I will do GREAT with whatever I put my heart into. I have had a lot of personal experience with HOSPICE with various family members and have had some great experiences. I think I would be very good at it and have had several people tell me that I am choosing the right path.

    Is there a difference between home-health hospice and a facility hospice? I really like the one-on-one patient contact.
    I'm sure you are making a good choice. Patient's will benefit from your life experience. I'm a Hospice Nurse and I can promise your age is not a negative, quite the opposite. Good Luck and thanks.
    tewdles likes this.
  12. 0
    Quote from kbkutlik
    I am at 50 starting yet a new career. I really feel in my heart that a Hospice CNA is for me. I am starting my Patients Tech I classes on January 28th and I am a little nervous about going back to school at this late time in my life. I am a very confident person and know I will do GREAT with whatever I put my heart into. I have had a lot of personal experience with HOSPICE with various family members and have had some great experiences. I think I would be very good at it and have had several people tell me that I am choosing the right path.

    Is there a difference between home-health hospice and a facility hospice? I really like the one-on-one patient contact.
    Congratulations on having the courage to start a new path in the prime of life! I graduated nursing school at 48. This year I will turn 50. Always keep learning!
  13. 0
    Welcome to hospice!

    Love on your patients...listen...be kind and gentle...go slow...laugh with them...look at their photo albums.

    Your job will be all about helping your patients to enjoy a quality of life while they still have life left. Your maturity will elevate your interactions with the patients.

    Good luck, keep us in the loop on how you are doing.


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