ABHR topical

  1. 0 Our hospice has not used this until now. Are you using this? We have always had the suppositories in our standing orders but not the topical. Does it work as well as the suppositories?
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  3. Visit  Vtachy1} profile page

    About Vtachy1

    Vtachy1 has '25' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'BNAT instructor, ICU, Hospice,triage'. From 'Illinois'; 42 Years Old; Joined Dec '08; Posts: 384; Likes: 220.

    9 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  tewdles} profile page
    0
    Quote from Vtachy1
    Our hospice has not used this until now. Are you using this? We have always had the suppositories in our standing orders but not the topical. Does it work as well as the suppositories?
    The evidence is mixed. Topical preps are only effective if the patient does not have fever or diaphoresis and if they have good perfusion, IMHO. I hae seen them used with good outcomes.
  5. Visit  Sue Damonas} profile page
    0
    We use it a lot and it works very well.
  6. Visit  SuesquatchRN} profile page
    0
    I prefer pretty much any route to TD. But that's me.
  7. Visit  Vtachy1} profile page
    0
    Where do you put it? How often can you give it?
  8. Visit  SuesquatchRN} profile page
    0
    Quote from Vtachy1
    Where do you put it? How often can you give it?
    The gel? Wrists, back, anywhere there's a little fat for absorption. And depending on the situation, Q1 isn't unusual.
  9. Visit  smurfynursey} profile page
    0
    Forgive my ignorance...

    But what is ABHR?
  10. Visit  tewdles} profile page
    0
    Quote from smurfynursey
    Forgive my ignorance...

    But what is ABHR?
    Ativan
    Benadryl
    Haloperidol
    Reglan

    no problem...
  11. Visit  eternalsunshine} profile page
    0
    As one of the posters points out, the evidence is mixed. I think there are other factors which depend on its absorbency, skin type, diaphoresis etc. Also I was once told that it is carried in a pleuronic agent, so it should for maximum effect, be applied to the same area, therefore, when I ever apply it, I always signs where I have applied it, i.e. left wrist.

    As there is no firm evidence, I often wonder how much of the actual drug is absorbed.
  12. Visit  FLArn} profile page
    1
    If the patient has no or limited absorption from the gut, it may be the best choice for the patient. Our hospice has used it for years with good results and we apply to wrists alernating wrists with each dose. P.S. It needs to be rubbed in to the skin.
    tewdles likes this.


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