doctor's office accessing of scripts doctor's office accessing of scripts - pg.5 | allnurses

doctor's office accessing of scripts - page 5

right about now I am ripshoot (george carlinism)....went for a work physical at a doctor's office that I have no prior relationship with and will have no further relationship with, and the MA looks... Read More

  1. Visit  SuzieVN profile page
    0
    Quote from GrnTea
    [FONT=comic sans ms]two points i haven't seen mentioned here:

    1) isn't it possible that when the person taking your history (in this case, the ma) looks at your record and asks, "you're taking x & y meds, is that right?" that's an opportunity for the patient to say, "no, that's not accurate, are you sure you're looking at my chart?" the last time i went to have a routine exam and lab draws, i got asked my name and birth date several times; this sort of recheck is common to prevent errors. i hear you that you, yourself, are ripped that your information is out there. but in the real world, it isn't all about you; policies that ask for verification with the live person are increasing, and they are not wrong.

    2) all of you who are indignant about the ease with which prescription information is available, imagine yourselves at work, in the ed. you have an unconscious, seizing person before you. you have his wallet so you have his name, age, and address. you wish you had some idea of what his medical status and medications are. do you: a) say, "thank goodness there's no possible way for us to find this out because it would be such an invasion of privacy, so we'll wing it from here. we'll have so much more fun this way anyhow!" or b) say, "unit secretary/whomever, get into the database and find out about this guy, stat!"

    Be careful what you ask for. You might get it.
  2. Visit  SuzieVN profile page
    0
    Quote from DSkelton711
    HIPAA was also designed for medical records to be accessible to those who need them in giving you care. It's not just about keeping things hidden. I would love my meds to be accessible to my doctors so I would not have to remember to bring them with me all the time. They should always take time to reconcile the list at every visit, though. I just don't understand why you are so upset. I would ask how they got the info to satisfy your curiosity, however.

    Oh so wrong, I LAUGHED. It is 'exactly' about keeping things hidden.
  3. Visit  SuzieVN profile page
    0
    Quote from netglow
    As always Esme is 100 percent on the money. I used to also handle all insurance for a practice while I was taking my prereqs for nursing. I'm not talking trash when I say the DATABASE in the sky is real. That, EMR is a way we contribute to hanging ourselves as practioners, and a way for the powers that be (doesn't matter: the government or the insurance companies = we're screwed) to decide who gets what treatment. It's already happening, and will be more final soon, that MDs/RNs will not be who makes medical decisions.

    And that database in the sky is already so out of control- GOOD LUCK finding out who violated your privacy...
  4. Visit  SuzieVN profile page
    0
    Quote from morte
    Please explain to me were I gave permission? This is an office that I have/had no previous association with, in a different state than my PCP, different hospital system.....WERE?

    Don't drink the koolaid, go read the laws for yourself. The privacy laws are far more comprehensive that some comments I see in here- just another reason why our privacy is being evaded, because the masses have no idea what is going on. If i were you, I'd contact a lawyer.
  5. Visit  NRSKarenRN profile page
    0
    Work place physicals are permitted after hiring offer to ensure fitness for duty.
    Medical examinations including medication history are permitted by law. HOWEVER, employer does not get access to this information, just examiners conclusions.

    Workplace Testing: What Your Employer May Require | Nolo.com

    Medical Examinations

    Once an employee is on the job, an employer's right to conduct a medical examination is usually limited to so-called "fitness for duty" situations. If an employee exhibits objective indications that he or she is physically or mentally unfit to perform the essential functions of the job (for example, by claiming an injury that makes working impossible), an employer may request that the employee's fitness for the job be evaluated by a medical examiner.


    Although the medical examiner can take a full history of the employee and conduct necessary tests to evaluate the employee's fitness, the employer is not generally entitled to all of this information -- only to the examiner's conclusions about whether the employee can work. Many states also impose strict limits on the information a doctor may disclose to an employer or an insurance company without the worker's consent.


    Similarly, although an employer may request a medical certification from an employee who needs to take leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), the employer is entitled only to specific information about the employee's need for leave -- not to a full health screening or medical history.


    The law also imposes certain privacy protections for the results of a medical examination. Data gathered in medical examinations must be kept in a separate personnel file available only to those with a demonstrable need to know, such as supervisors -- who may need information about the employee's work restrictions or reasonable accommodations -- and first aid and safety personnel (if the employee's disability might require emergency treatment).
    Workplace Testing: What Your Employer May Require | Nolo.com

  6. Visit  Jory profile page
    0
    You may possibly live in a state where the prescription information is located on a state wide database.

    That is put in place for two reasons:

    1. Patient safety...it's important that any physician you know what you are taking, whether you wish you hide it or not. Lying to the physician is putting them and you at risk.

    2. Drug seekers...it makes their job harder to obtain prescription medications illegally.

    I don't live in a state with a database except for narcotics but I do border a state that does.
  7. Visit  morte profile page
    0
    reread, a one time visit for a particular service. no meds involved. Portability for MY benefit, not my loss. Small town, could have cost me the job.....
    Quote from Mulan
    Isn't that what HIPAA is all about though? Portability?

    So that anyone caring for you has access to all of your records, history, etc.
  8. Visit  morte profile page
    0
    Quote from NRSKarenRN
    Work place physicals are permitted after hiring offer to ensure fitness for duty.
    Medical examinations including medication history are permitted by law. HOWEVER, employer does not get access to this information, just examiners conclusions.
    I am thinking you have never lived in a small minded, small town. Just as tales are spread about nurses amongst employers, I have no doubt that things of interest get around. HIPAA or not.
  9. Visit  uRNmyway profile page
    3
    Quote from morte
    reread, a one time visit for a particular service. no meds involved. Portability for MY benefit, not my loss. Small town, could have cost me the job.....

    Aha! So there it is. You DID have something to hide, that could have cost you a job. Therein lies all this anger. If portability would be for your loss, not your benefit, then there was indeed something to hide. If you would be willing to walk out of the office to hide it, then it is probably something you would not have been hired for anyways.
    I'm pretty sure if there was nothing in your record that could cost you said job, you would not have your panties in such a bunch.

    But since you keep referring to your OP...the meds you take ARE relevant to a physical, as others have said many times. Doesn't matter if this new MA was going to be prescribing. When you do a H&P or admission of a new patient, do you take a look at what they take, or do you rely on them to tell you everything? On that note, how many times have your patients on admission forgotten to mention some meds?


    I get your basic point. Big brother is everywhere.
    KelRN215, Altra, and Mulan like this.
  10. Visit  SuzieVN profile page
    0
    In a clinic I wrote about, at intake, using an 'etch a sketch' type thing to give my history, I touched the wrong box, for alcohol intake. When I got my online version? It said I drink '5-7' drinks, 5-7 days per week, rather than the '1-2' drinks, 1-3 days per week? Also, there were a few other problems, such as a lab report for a test I did NOT receive. I didn't have my reading glasses when when I went in there, since I had no idea such technology existed. They sent me a corrected version, via email- but the original was already in cyper space, and I'm sure it still IS.
  11. Visit  Mulan profile page
    0
    Quote from morte
    reread, a one time visit for a particular service. no meds involved. Portability for MY benefit, not my loss. Small town, could have cost me the job.....
    No need to reread, understood it the first time.

    I don't think you can have it both ways.
  12. Visit  tewdles profile page
    1
    I dunno, the last couple of times I had a work physical they did not review my meds. They showed me which drugs were tested on the screen and asked if I wanted to declare an RX for any.

    They then proceded to assess my physical ability to do the job...you know, bending, reaching, lifting, etc. Checked my vitals, my weight, and sent me on my way.

    This is not a comprehensive health screening.
    SuzieVN likes this.
  13. Visit  morte profile page
    0
    THANK YOU! There is no need for this to have been done! Had nothing to do with capacity to do job. And when did the desire to maintain my privacy, become "I have something to hide that SHOULD have cost me a job"?
    Quote from tewdles
    I dunno, the last couple of times I had a work physical they did not review my meds. They showed me which drugs were tested on the screen and asked if I wanted to declare an RX for any.

    They then proceded to assess my physical ability to do the job...you know, bending, reaching, lifting, etc. Checked my vitals, my weight, and sent me on my way.

    This is not a comprehensive health screening.

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