doctor's office accessing of scripts - pg.4 | allnurses

doctor's office accessing of scripts - page 4

right about now I am ripshoot (george carlinism)....went for a work physical at a doctor's office that I have no prior relationship with and will have no further relationship with, and the MA looks... Read More

  1. Visit  morte profile page
    0
    yes, that is the service that they use. Now, why do they (doc's office) have access to my prior hx, without my signed consent in a nonemergent situation? It once was nec to sign consent for this. So, if i want a second, untainted by prior knowledge, second onpinion, I can't get it? beside the point that this office visit entailed NO CARE, no possibility of conflicting prescriptions! No controls of any kind, and totally unrelated to job performance, so, yes, it IS totally the principle of the thing that has me so irritated!
    Quote from kids
    Do people not realize that every State has a database for logging prescriptions for scheduled/controlled drug, and that many states log every prescription you fill?
    Abuse of the Federal Prescription Database Law - TalkLeft: The Politics Of Crime
    Prescription Drug Monitoring Program - FAQ

    Also, at least one commonly used escript provider draws prescription history from a multitude of sources.
    Surescripts - The Nation's E-Prescription Network - Physicians/Prescribers


    My brand new doctor, paid for using brand new insurance, 3000 miles from my old doctor, had access to every med I've been prescribed in the last 3 years, who prescribed it and what pharmacy I filled it at.
  2. Visit  morte profile page
    1
    Finally! someone how "gets it"!
    Quote from nursel56
    Right. It's not about coordination of care between providers, either. Who would dispute that is ultimately a time-saver and perhaps even a way to avoid an unanticipated negative event due to miscommunication between various specialists in cases where people have multiple numbers of them. So go ahead and give consent for that. It doesn't mean the choice should be taken away from everyone else, though.
    BINGO!

    The issue is who directs the release of such information
    . I'm a pessimist (or a realist?) - I just assume anything in cyberspace can be discovered by someone else, either through intent or human error.
    YES! AND YES!
    I don't blame morte one bit for being upset about that.
    Teacup Pom likes this.
  3. Visit  GrnTea profile page
    5
    two points i haven't seen mentioned here:

    1) isn't it possible that when the person taking your history (in this case, the ma) looks at your record and asks, "you're taking x & y meds, is that right?" that's an opportunity for the patient to say, "no, that's not accurate, are you sure you're looking at my chart?" the last time i went to have a routine exam and lab draws, i got asked my name and birth date several times; this sort of recheck is common to prevent errors. i hear you that you, yourself, are ripped that your information is out there. but in the real world, it isn't all about you; policies that ask for verification with the live person are increasing, and they are not wrong.

    2) all of you who are indignant about the ease with which prescription information is available, imagine yourselves at work, in the ed. you have an unconscious, seizing person before you. you have his wallet so you have his name, age, and address. you wish you had some idea of what his medical status and medications are. do you: a) say, "thank goodness there's no possible way for us to find this out because it would be such an invasion of privacy, so we'll wing it from here. we'll have so much more fun this way anyhow!" or b) say, "unit secretary/whomever, get into the database and find out about this guy, stat!"
    Teacup Pom, BlueDevil,DNP, uRNmyway, and 2 others like this.
  4. Visit  morte profile page
    0
    you are bringing irrelevant issues into the discussion. i did not present to an ed unconscious and seizing. that scenario is totally unrelated to my situation. unconscious patient=implied consent. i was not unconscious! no more extraneous scenarios need be added.
    Quote from grntea
    two points i haven't seen mentioned here:

    1) isn't it possible that when the person taking your history (in this case, the ma) looks at your record and asks, "you're taking x & y meds, is that right?" that's an opportunity for the patient to say, "no, that's not accurate, are you sure you're looking at my chart?" the last time i went to have a routine exam and lab draws, i got asked my name and birth date several times; this sort of recheck is common to prevent errors. i hear you that you, yourself, are ripped that your information is out there. but in the real world, it isn't all about you; policies that ask for verification with the live person are increasing, and they are not wrong.

    2) all of you who are indignant about the ease with which prescription information is available, imagine yourselves at work, in the ed. you have an unconscious, seizing person before you. you have his wallet so you have his name, age, and address. you wish you had some idea of what his medical status and medications are. do you: a) say, "thank goodness there's no possible way for us to find this out because it would be such an invasion of privacy, so we'll wing it from here. we'll have so much more fun this way anyhow!" or b) say, "unit secretary/whomever, get into the database and find out about this guy, stat!"
  5. Visit  classicdame profile page
    1
    that is what Obamacare is about - sharing of information between healthcare providers. Creepy, huh?
    DSkelton711 likes this.
  6. Visit  morte profile page
    1
    Quote from classicdame
    that is what Obamacare is about - sharing of information between healthcare providers. Creepy, huh?
    good ol' GWB is responsible for this one.
    sharpeimom likes this.
  7. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    0
    Morte.....I don't blame you for being upset for whatever your meds were it's the principle but as electronic medical records go forward and there is closer government scrutiny due to a single payer system AND regulations are developed the more your privacy is NON EXISTANT. Technology is faster than the laws and our privacy is only a figment of our imagination.

    Did you sign a consent to be see by the MD? Then you signed for them to view your medical records. Some states right now have databases for meds that are filled submitted by the pharmacies and can be accessed by anyone who subscribes to the database (which is increasingly common) HIPAA is a whipping post to scare nurses in submission.

    HIPAA gives you the right to have a read out of who has accessed your medical record and have every entry into your record explained....and audit. Have your record audited. Ask them why.
  8. Visit  DSkelton711 profile page
    0
    HIPAA was also designed for medical records to be accessible to those who need them in giving you care. It's not just about keeping things hidden. I would love my meds to be accessible to my doctors so I would not have to remember to bring them with me all the time. They should always take time to reconcile the list at every visit, though. I just don't understand why you are so upset. I would ask how they got the info to satisfy your curiosity, however.
  9. Visit  morte profile page
    0
    reread the original....there was not and never will be any care provided by this practice. there was no need to see what meds I may have been taking, no med rec to be done.
    Quote from DSkelton711
    HIPAA was also designed for medical records to be accessible to those who need them in giving you care. It's not just about keeping things hidden. I would love my meds to be accessible to my doctors so I would not have to remember to bring them with me all the time. They should always take time to reconcile the list at every visit, though. I just don't understand why you are so upset. I would ask how they got the info to satisfy your curiosity, however.
  10. Visit  Mulan profile page
    0
    I'd be ****** too.
  11. Visit  Mulan profile page
    0
    Isn't that what HIPAA is all about though? Portability?

    So that anyone caring for you has access to all of your records, history, etc.
  12. Visit  SuzieVN profile page
    0
    Quote from Jolie
    If the meds were prescribed or filled by a provider within a particular network or system, then that information would be available to any provider within the network/system.

    If you want to receive "anonymous" healthcare, use a pseudonym and pay cash.

    I don't know of any other means to "hide" information from a provider, nor any reason to justify doing so.

    You're going to have a change of heart come January, 2014.
  13. Visit  SuzieVN profile page
    0
    Quote from Ashley, PICU RN
    Your tone is very combative. You may not get only opinions that you agree with here, but nevertheless they are valid points. No one is patronizing because they don't agree with you.

    Clearly there IS something that's a problem, and it's not just the principle. You did not want to office to know about the medications you were taking and are very upset that they found out. Your comment about having the option to walk out suggests that you would not have been forthcoming with the information if you were asked and would rather forfeit the job (work physical) instead of disclose your medication use. Regardless of what medications you're taking, if you were at the doctor's office for a physical that assessed your ability to competently work, then they need to know what medications you are taking. That information was made available by your insurance company. If you don't like it, then you need to talk to your insurance company and find out why it's allowed and if you can do anything to stop it.

    What you need to understand is that you don't have to sign a consent form for every little thing. When a patient is admitted to the hospital they sign one general consent form. They don't sign a consent for an IV, another consent for a blood draw, another consent for an x-ray, another consent for an NG tube, another consent for medications, another for IV fluids, etc. When you signed a consent to be seen at the doctor's office, that includes consent for them to access your medical information. I apologize if you were not aware of this or don't agree with it.

    There's MUCH wrong with this post, as far as HITECH>HIPPA>and other federal mandates goes. Too much to get into.

    Caveat: There is no privacy, regardless of what laws are in effect.


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