Military Nursing Questions Answered - page 17

by navyman7 61,124 Views | 204 Comments

Hello. I have seen many questions posted about the recruiting, the military, and future military experiences, I wanted to start a Q & A forum where you can ask questions related to the military from someone who is in the... Read More


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    jagnurse: you also will need to work with a recruiter. With so many applicants I can't predict what GPA they are starting at. I would say that the more experience as a RN that you have the more marketable you will become. The CNA type experience is helpful but won't weigh in too much. They want licensed individuals with experience. But maybe you can get lucky. Can't hurt to try. Just work on the experience part too.
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    I am interested in NROTC for nursing, but came across an age limit for the Nurse Scholarship Program (23 years old) - I am turning 27 in a few months...am I completely disqualified from this scholarship, or are there any exceptions to this age limit? If the age limit is strict, does that mean I cannot apply for the NROTC nursing program as a whole, or does it just mean I cannot apply for the scholarship only? Worst case scenario, what are the other options for nursing with NROTC and how would/could they be paid for?
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    Quote from jarmstrong108
    I am interested in NROTC for nursing, but came across an age limit for the Nurse Scholarship Program (23 years old) - I am turning 27 in a few months...am I completely disqualified from this scholarship, or are there any exceptions to this age limit? If the age limit is strict, does that mean I cannot apply for the NROTC nursing program as a whole, or does it just mean I cannot apply for the scholarship only? Worst case scenario, what are the other options for nursing with NROTC and how would/could they be paid for?
    You can still attend ROTC you just can't apply for the scholarship. You can try the NCP Which is the navy nurse candidate program scholarship. If you get that I don't really see a need to attend NROTC with you being guaranteed a commission upon passing NCLEX it will just be extra work.
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    Thanks for the info - sounds like I have a few more things to talk to a recruiter about!
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    This post is directed probably toward Navyman, or really anyone in the USN.
    Have you seen or even heard of commissioned officers in the navy (line officers) conducting a lateral transfer to the nurse corps? And if so, did they have their RN/BSN first or was there ever a case you know of that the Navy put them through a second degree BSN program, etc.?
    Last edit by rgr22 on Mar 27, '13
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    Hello! I have been a pediatric intensive care nurse for 4.5 years and graduated with a BSN. I currently work for a military hospital in a part of the country with heavy military influence. I have seen so many people who have had great experiences in the military and I am trying to figure out if this is my path or not. I am not partial to any branch at this point. I feel like it would provide me with many life changing opportunities. Am I crazy? Would I have any chance of getting to stay in my happy PICU land, or would they ship me right next door to big people ICU. yikes! Do you all have regrets once you have signed? Are PICU nurses likely to deploy? I would figure that they would be because children are not protected from war. Idk, thoughts?
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    Hello navyman7,

    I just happened to stumble upon this thread of FAQ about Navy nursing -- this has been a great find and thank you for providing the information you have so far!

    I am a 24 year old female (single with no dependents or medical history) and have just been accepted to an accredited BSN program for the Fall 2013 which will take me 3 years full-time to complete. I have been seriously considering an Active Duty career as a nurse in the military for a long time. I have spoken to a Navy Healthcare Recruiter and she said that when I have 2 years of school left to apply for the Navy Nurse Candidate Program.

    The NNCP is still an option for me at this point, but coming from someone who is not a recruiter and with your experience in the Navy I wanted to know:

    1. Are there any other routes to becoming a navy nurse besides the NNCP? Just in case there is anything I might be unaware of.

    2. Would you be able to offer any advice regarding how I can bee seen as a competitive applicant? What does the Navy look for and want to see in a nurse?

    3. What is a typical day as a navy nurse like?


    Thank you in advance, it's greatly appreciated!
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    RGR 22,
    I know of an Anesthesiologist (MDA) who was a prior nurse. Also it's not uncommon to meet former SEALS/Pilots who have left that area to become PA's or something like that. I think in most cases, they utilize some sort of scholarship program or use their GI Bill to get their degrees. You would need to speak to someone who has actually done it, otherwise I think that any info from a recruiter would be based on speculation.
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    RESINGRN,
    Typically they would place you in the PICU because you have a specialty that takes time to train people in. Now things are changing at our hospital where they may put you somewhere regardless of your training and wants because they think that you need to learn how to be an officer first and then you can move to a specialty area. It's a load of crap! But that's what I am seeing at NMCSD. Hopefully not the case at other places. Good luck.
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    resignrn,

    It will all depend on your subspeciality code. If you have at least 2 years as a BSN with PICU experience. You can get your 1922 code. That would be your best chance of getting back into the PICU. I have seen nurses come in with ICU experience without a BSN and had to start all over on medsurg. Even then it all depends on where you get orders to. Some hospitals do not even have a peds floor. Like navyman said it also depends on your DNS. They may stick you on a medsurg floor to learn how to be an officer. When I was at ODS most of the nurses that came in with subspecialty codes went to the BIG 3 then some new grads and the rest of us got stuck at the medium size hospitals.

    emt0089

    I know you directed that at navyman but I figured I'd help out.

    1) The programs I know of are NCP, ROTC, and direct commission. If you are prior enlisted then there is MECPS.

    2) Everyone will tell you different. I was accepted with a 3.7 GPA no extracurricular activities and no volunteer work. However, I had recommendations from nurses in and out of the military. In addition to that I have a very long family history serving in the military and emphasized on that in my essay.

    3) 12 hour shifts. 3 one week and 4 the next. You switch between night and days depending on your floor schedule. In addition to that you have a collateral duty or duties. Some are lucky enough to complete these during their shift others have meetings on their days off and are expected to be there. I put in about 10 hours every month of my off time for my duties.


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