Military Nursing Questions Answered - page 17

Hello. I have seen many questions posted about the recruiting, the military, and future military experiences, I wanted to start a Q & A forum where you can ask questions related to the military from... Read More

  1. Visit  vinstafa profile page
    0
    So, would you suggest parking at USUHS? (I'm guessing that is open to everyone). Does the Medical Center stop having parking? Sorry for so many questions, I just want to see what I am getting myself into since I will be coming from south of Baltimore.
  2. Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  3. Visit  wtbcrna profile page
    0
    Quote from vinstafa
    So, would you suggest parking at USUHS? (I'm guessing that is open to everyone). Does the Medical Center stop having parking? Sorry for so many questions, I just want to see what I am getting myself into since I will be coming from south of Baltimore.
    I should have clarified. WR staff members cannot park at USUHS, and USUHS students and staff cannot park in the WR parking lot. There are exceptions, but that is the general rule. I would talk to your supervisor/sponsor and see what the current situation parking situation is at WR.
  4. Visit  mylesh89 profile page
    0
    Hello NavyMan7, hope you're doing well. I've read the many postings and I've learned a lot.

    I'm studying nursing at a community college and hope to transfer to a state university to achieve my BSN. I'm very interested in becoming a Navy Nurse, working in the ED. I'm unsure on what is the best method of making this possible; should I pursue the NCP (Nurse Candidate Program) method or the HPLRP (Health Professions Loan Repayment Program) method? I won't be able to afford the BSN on my own. I have no problem serving for years or being deployed, I welcome it. I would like to serve as soon as possible once done with school and hopefully be stationed in Bethesda.

    Any help is greatly appreciated, I thank you in advance.
  5. Visit  jfratian profile page
    1
    Just know it's highly unlikely that you will get ED/ER right-off-the-bat as a new grad in the military. They like you to start in inpatient med-surg (or OB/L&D).

    You're joining the military knowing that you will have somewhat limited control over where you live and what area of nursing you practice once there.

    I think that you can pursue both. My understanding is that HLRP occurs soon after you graduate (when you get to 1st base) while NCP accepts you before graduation.
    mylesh89 likes this.
  6. Visit  mylesh89 profile page
    0
    Thanx jfratian for responding to my questions. I greatly appreciate it. I know I won't be able to enter the ER right away unfortunately, but I'm willing work for it. I also know that where I'm stationed isn't up to me, I hope it's on the eastern side of the country. Can you give my any insight that you have gained from being a Military Nurse?
  7. Visit  jfratian profile page
    0
    I haven't deployed. However, my stateside experience is that military treatment facilities have far fewer capabilities than ever your average civilian community hospital (I have done inpatient med-surg on both sides of the fence); if your base even has a hospital it's unlikely that it will have more than a few dozen inpatient beds.

    The career progression for military nurses is the real reason to join in my opinion. Few civilian nurses (even in management) make the pay of an O4 or O5. Plus, the military has master clinician and educator roles (as high as O6) for those who don't wish to be commanders. No civilian nurse clinician is making that kind of money unless they are in management.
  8. Visit  mylesh89 profile page
    0
    Question, how often can you be deployed? For example: if I prefer to be deployed more often than not, how possible is this?
  9. Visit  jfratian profile page
    1
    It is totally mission-dependent. Right now, I want to deploy but can't. We are drawing down in the middle east, and they're really aren't that many spots. It really just mirrors what's going on in the world and is hard to predict.

    If you want to deploy, then you should try to get into OR, ICU, or ER nursing; they deploy more frequently. That's really all you can control.
    lindarn likes this.
  10. Visit  mylesh89 profile page
    0
    Are there any other places that you could be deployed to? Or is the middle east more of an actually deployment zone?
  11. Visit  jfratian profile page
    1
    They assign you to a specific base/location. I have no idea how many there are. Many of them seem to be in the middle east, but there are other places. For example, CCATT missions long term may be considered deployments.
    lindarn likes this.
  12. Visit  mylesh89 profile page
    0
    Ah ok. Which naval hospital and department are you working at?
  13. Visit  jfratian profile page
    1
    I'm actually AF. Elmendorf AFB in Anchorage, AK. Inpatient Med-Surg.
    lindarn likes this.
  14. Visit  mylesh89 profile page
    0
    Alaska, nice! Do you like it over there? Can't say I've been. I imagine you intend to retire military.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top