Introduction - I Want to Join the Military and Nobody Understands - page 2

Let's see. Hi, I'm Cate. A short introduction. I'm seventeen years old and a sophomore at a small liberal arts college. I'm graduating in May with an AA in Liberal Arts and (hopefully)... Read More

  1. by   traumaRUs
    I am a USN vet and want to thank you for wanting to serve. It is indeed an honor, no matter what branch.
  2. by   raskolnikov
    Thanks everyone for your words of encouragement! It has meant a lot. I had lunch with my mother today and she had told my father about my future plans. He was, surprisingly, very impressed and proud that I was even considering joining. I was not expecting that at all! So it was nice. He isn't very well-informed (like, he didn't think it would be possible for me to join as an officer) but still very encouraging.

    I'm awaiting a reply from the ROTC officer at my transfer school to ask more questions and see if ROTC is right for me. If it is, then I would be Army, but I still don't know what branch for sure.


    I was curious, does anybody have any information or experience in combat nursing? How does one get "as close as to the fight as possible"? I hate the way that sounds, but as I said before, I am interested in emergency medicine/trauma, and it seems logical (to me at least) that one would find that in areas of combat. I was just curious how a nurse gets there. I apologize if that sounds wrong. I just didn't know how to phrase it. I am not a war-junkie, just interested in serving my country in the best way I can.
  3. by   Gennaver
    Quote from raskolnikov
    ...
    I was curious, does anybody have any information or experience in combat nursing? How does one get "as close as to the fight as possible"? I hate the way that sounds, but as I said before, I am interested in emergency medicine/trauma, and it seems logical (to me at least) that one would find that in areas of combat. I was just curious how a nurse gets there. I apologize if that sounds wrong. I just didn't know how to phrase it. I am not a war-junkie, just interested in serving my country in the best way I can.
    Hello,
    From what I have read you may be referring to "Combat Station Hospitals" although the Army medical centers and also many of the Army community hospitals also do have ERs.

    Gen
  4. by   NavyCheerGirl
    Hi, Raskolnikov, I'm a nursing major (sort of...) who is very very interested in joining the Navy Nurse Corps! My parents were surprised when I said I wanted to join the Navy and nurse there. They weren't happy with the idea but then they grew to see it's what I want and I intend to persue that goal to the fullest. My mom also thought for a while I wanted to be a Navy nurse because I fell into the romance of Pearl Harbor, which isn't true, although I know I'd like to marry into the military! I really want to help the soldiers who are protecting my country- they're dying for us and I can't help but feel sad when I hear about another soldier dead while I'm living in a very comfortable environment! I'm related to a patriot from the Revolutionary War (from my home state!) and I think if he were here today he'd ask what the heck is going on. So not only do I feel it's my patriotic duty, but also like I inherited the military bloodline with it. I don't just plan on doing medical duties- I even want to start my own relief fund for soldiers (I have the ideas down I would just like some recognition for the idea to be set in motion). It must be a great honor to be a nurse or Hospital Corpsman in the military because sacrificing what someone has in order to serve someone else is not only bold but also makes that person a wonderful role model. For me, someone in the military, especially in the medical field, is a good role model.

    If you're interested in both the Navy and Army, you can make military nursing your life by doing one branch first. I'm thinking of Navy then Army, and possibly Air Force after that. It's great you want to join! The soldiers will really appreciate one more nurse. That way, one more soldier might be saved and come home in good shape as possible.

    My suggestions to you are to listen very carefully to your ROTC advisor and any other officers you talk to. If you have any family members or friends currently enlisted or officers in the Navy (not necessarily nurses, either), talk to them because you can gain important information. You may hear many different things, but it's important for your understanding.

    As for seeing if the ROTC is right for you, if you find that it isn't, I plan to do this (maybe it'll help): first I'm getting my BSN (actually, first my RN then an RN-BSN program). After I get my BSN I'll take the nursing liscence exam. Finally going to the OIS (Officer Indoctrination School--> Navy), and then it's onto the Navy! However, the good side to an ROTC option is you'll get the indepth training you'll need. It won't just be physical training, but other important military aspects such as ethics and labs. I know of one school that has its nursing school "incorperated" with its (N)ROTC program. That way, nurses get their important sciences (anatomy and physiology, chemistry, pathology, etc) in as well as focus on the military part.

    Good luck in your quest to join the military nurses!
    Last edit by NavyCheerGirl on Jan 3, '07
  5. by   kamon8404
    NavyCheerGirl

    Well, I'm only 20, and I'm currently enlisted in the US Navy. I'm not a nurse, I'm a Hospital Corpsman. I work directly with the Marine Corps, on providing frontline patient care. I am currently working on becoming a nurse in my off time though. If you have any questions about the medical department of the navy and marine corps, please feel free to PM me.

    If I could become a nurse in the Navy I would consider staying in for 20 yrs, easy!

    Thank you for your want and desire to serve!

    J
  6. by   Gennaver
    Quote from NavyCheerGirl
    first I'm getting my BSN (actually, first my RN then an RN-BSN program). After I get my BSN I'll take the nursing liscence exam.

    Hi there,
    It may be necessary for you to sit for NCLEX after your RN program. I think in order to go to a BSN bridge program you must have your license already.

    Besides, why wait the extra 1-2+ years after your RN courses to sit for NCLEX? That may be far too long between to sit for NCLEX. I hope to sit for NCLEX a month after completing my RN program.

    Good luck!
    Gen
  7. by   twinmommy+2
    As far as Army, hair length is fine at any length as long as you can keep it up off your collar and neat looking (and as long as your cover stays on your head). Showers are as short as you can make them and still get everything clean.

    Don't worry about everyone else laughing, people are generally scared of stuff they know nothing about. If you feel this is a calling for you, then contact your local recruiter. Also try and contact some people in your area face to face about their military experience. You can't always take the recruiters word as golden so its good to take someone elses experience into account.

    Good luck to you!
  8. by   NavyCheerGirl
    OO so I need to take my NCLEX after I get my RN? I'm glad I read that because I wouldn't have known. I heard the NCLEX is wicked difficult... I'm struggling in the sciences as it is (I'm more of a language person but I want to be a nurse in order to help others and do something else with my life because I feel Navy nursing is my calling)! I just hope I can do this because being able to help the soldiers would mean a lot to me- I'm really looking forward to it!
  9. by   NavyCheerGirl
    Raskolnikov, if you have any more questions about the military, I recommend reading Married to the Military by Meredith Leyva. Even though I don't have a boyfriend in the military, I read the book anyway because the book's "subtitle" implies even women in uniform can find this book helpful. The book talks about different things from how to talk/interact with different ranks to what you'll need to depend on when you're in the military. For example, I read that (and I quote): "Occupational licenses, such as nursing, obtained in one state may not be valid in another state. This is particularly true in the People's Republic of California. Check with the career counselor or state occupational safety board website to find out if your occupational license is accepted at your new duty station," something I wouldn't have thought about. Thank goodness I read this book or I wouldn't have known that important piece, considering I'm making military nursing my life!
    Last edit by NavyCheerGirl on Jan 3, '07
  10. by   fishgirl
    Great Idea!
    My daughter joined the Navy in 03' right out of High School and is now in a nursing position in CA. She has been on an Aircraft carrier in the Pacific Ocean for 6 months and seaside for 2 1/2 years. She had to cut her hair in boot camp but let it grow after that. She was taught in the Navy nursing and can take state boards at any time. She really grew up in the 3 years of duty and plans on making it a career, she will retire at 38 how great is that.
    Also, her recruiter said Navy was the best (of course) because you are usually on the sea and most fighting is on land. (Made sense at the time)

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