Allowing Corpsman to Become Nurses - page 14

Watching the Presidential debate tonight and a statement by Obama made my head turn. He was relating a story when a corpsman was stating that he has treated wounded soldiers but when he became a... Read More

  1. Visit  jeckrn profile page
    0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    I was lucky. After 4 years of humping it with the infantry I got to work in a hospital. I knew I wanted to challenge the LPN so I took the requirments to my commander and asked it could be arranged that I work in all the setting required. She was very understanding and arranged for me to work in different areas.




    I am curious if you shopped around with different nursing schools? I found a wide variety of what they would accept.



    There are a few jobs in nursing that would give you similar autonomy like you had as a corpsman. My job as RRT for example allows me to order any sort of diagnostic test from an EKG to an chest CT to R/O PE. I can administer a wide variety of medications on standing orders and protocols. For example when the post CABG patient goes into rapid a-fib with RVR I can order the EKG and BMP. I can administer Lopressor IV and even amioderone drip all on my judgement and based off a protocol. No physician is ever involved. For respiratory cases I can do everything from give them a little O2 or an albuterol neb to intubate them. I am in the curious position of not only being able to order tests, labs, etc, but also preforme them myself. i can draw my own ABGs, get my own EKGs, etc. That is why my hospital has found that time between when a problem is noticed and when it is effectivly dealt with has been cut dramaticaly with the RRT RNs vs a resident ordering things, then waiting around for the lab people to come and draw.
    My old job as critical care transport RN also provided a lot of autonomy. My advise is to get yourself some very high qualiety ICU experience and put yourself in a position to move up into some of the better jobs. Believe me your corpsman experience will be appreciated at this level.
    Sounds like most hospital RN positions that I have ever worked in. Everything you did was understanding orders. There is a physician, NP, or PA Behind the scene who wrote the orders. Being a military medic/corpsman had nothing to do with this. My RN' s work under these conditions. As far as your experience it will depend on how good you are not just being a prior HM. this is the same for RN' s there are good ones and others who can not get out of their own way. Do not come in with a chip on your shoulder because it will get knocked off, you will need to learn how the hospital runs and most do not run any where like the military. This also goes when you change job's as a RN since each hospital does it their own way. It's the little things that are different which can hang you out to dry.
    Last edit by jeckrn on May 6
  2. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    Quote from jeckrn
    Sounds like most hospital RN positions that I have ever worked in. Everything you did was understanding orders. There is a physician, NP, or PA Behind the scene who wrote the order

    Its actually not much at all like other hospital RN positions. I have worked as a staff nurse in 4 states, 2 countries and as a traveler in another 4 states and in none of those jobs did I, or any of the nurses I worked with, have the autonomy that the RRT and transport RNs have where I work now.
    Just not being assigned our own patients alone makes it a very different job. I have never worked in any hospital where a regular staff RN, who for example, notices EKG changes, orders lab tests, interprets the lab tests, them administers medication (for example mag sulfate, Lopressor, Amio, etc) without physician involvement. Of course all medications are given on protocols or standing orders.
    When I worked in CVICU we would have very similar protocols but they only applied to specific patients, in that case CV surgery patients, in that one unit. Its also unusual for a regular staff RN to have the authority to transfer a patient to a higher level of care based on their own judgment of the patient's needs. Even more unusual for an RN to be able to be privileged to implement these protocols on people who are on hospital property, but not patients, like staff members for example. Few nurses would have privileges to start any patient on bi-pap, c-pap, or intubate them based on their own physical and test result assessments. For sure it's common for a nurse who is caring for a patient being treated for respiratory issues to have a standing order for these things on that particular patient, or maybe for a patient in that unit, but to be able to apply such interventions across the hospital is very unusual.
  3. Visit  jeckrn profile page
    0
    Sorry but I have worked in 3 states and 5 different hospitals and everyone had standing orders and levels of independence based o. The facility and the physicians. Every med or treatment we give is under a physician's order somewhere.
  4. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    Quote from jeckrn
    Sorry but I have worked in 3 states and 5 different hospitals and everyone had standing orders and levels of independence based o. The facility and the physicians. Every med or treatment we give is under a physician's order somewhere.

    I am wondering if you lack reading comprehension, or are being deliberately obtuse.
  5. Visit  jeckrn profile page
    0
    Sorry that you do not understand this but nursing does not always fit your image based on your experiences because have different experiences than yours.
  6. Visit  MrChicagoRN profile page
    1
    Quote from Red Kryptonite
    Gateway Community College in Phoenix recently started what they believe to be the first and only program of its kind in the country: a five month military medic to LPN course. It builds on the knowledge and experience these medics already have and gets them ready to take the NCLEX-PN. After that, they're equivalent to any other LPN in Arizona, and once they get the prereqs/coreqs done, can apply for advanced placement into 3rd block of the RN program.

    Veterans/LPN Bridge | GateWay Community College
    Illinois has 3 c.c. offering similar programs, but I don't know any of the details

    Military / Corpsman to LPN Programs
    College of DuPage ............................................
    Illinois Central College .......................................
    Joliet Junior College ...........................................
    icuRNmaggie likes this.

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