SNF

  1. 0
    hi guys.

    I just wanted some advice about working at a SNF. I will soon be starting 8hr NOC shift at a SNF...im a fairly new nurse (one year of experience at an acute rehab, RN:PT ratio were 1:12) and am worried about the patient to nurse ratio at a SNF! Any advice or story will be helpful!

    Thanks
  2. 6 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Hi! I am a new LPN (graduated May 11, 2012) I started orientation at a SNF on Monday, and I must say I am overwhelmed! I think once I get the swing of things I will enjoy it, but it is just so much to take in! The paper work is out of this world! It is 20 residents per nurse and you have your med pass, treatments, charting, and any accident/incidents that happen on your shift. You have doctors, family memebers and any and everyone else calling and needing this or that, I could go on.....but I must say this most of the residents will melt your heart and I know the good will outweigh the bad! Best of luck to you!
  4. 0
    Read thru the geriatric forums. It's a good place to start getting a grasp of what's it like.
  5. 1
    I have had anywhere from 50-70+. I hated SNF. I hated LTC. I got out as soon as I could. Less than 20 minutes per resident with some requiring meds that take 15 minutes to prep, combative, checking 40+ sugars an hour, g tubes, trachs, lots of time-intensive wound care, it's impossible to do safe and proper care with rations like SNF/LTC. I honestly say run but that was the worse experience of my life, working LTC/SNF.
    DavidKarl likes this.
  6. 1
    Quote from JZ_RN
    I have had anywhere from 50-70+. I hated SNF. I hated LTC. I got out as soon as I could. Less than 20 minutes per resident with some requiring meds that take 15 minutes to prep, combative, checking 40+ sugars an hour, g tubes, trachs, lots of time- intensive wound care, it's impossible to do safe and proper care with rations like SNF/LTC. I honestly say run but that was the worse experience of my life, working LTC/SNF.
    Wow, 40 blood sugars is insane! Was everybody daily? Most diabetics in LTC can be safely checked two or three times a week. Sliding scale insulin has no place in LTC. I must ask though, how on earth would it take someone 15 minutes to set up one resident'smeds?? Even a feeding tube pt with 25 meds doesn't take 15 minutes to set up!
    LTCangel likes this.
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    LOL They were AC-HS and usually before meals as well. When a patient has 2 insulins to be drawn up after checking their sugar (which you have to beg plead and fight them to let you do then usually call the doc cause they're over 500 cause they eat whatever and you have to get new orders and put them in etc., etc.), plus over 20 pills, some of which must be counted for proper dosage, opened or crushed, drawn up, reconstituted, etc., it can take 15 minutes. Especially with gtubes if you check placement of the tube like you should, flush like you should, etc. Then you have to mix pills with pudding for one patient, applesauce for others, get them up to sitting to give them to them, do small bites, give thickened liquids, give them time to swallow, keep going, pour the liquid meds, try to get them to take them... it can get ridiculous.
    DavidKarl and IowaKaren like this.
  8. 0
    Quote from ruby123
    Hi! I am a new LPN (graduated May 11, 2012) I started orientation at a SNF on Monday, and I must say I am overwhelmed! I think once I get the swing of things I will enjoy it, but it is just so much to take in! The paper work is out of this world! It is 20 residents per nurse and you have your med pass, treatments, charting, and any accident/incidents that happen on your shift. You have doctors, family memebers and any and everyone else calling and needing this or that, I could go on.....but I must say this most of the residents will melt your heart and I know the good will outweigh the bad! Best of luck to you!
    Thank! Today will be my first night working independently. Nurse to patients ratio is 1:60!!!
    I will be charting on 20+ resident. I hope I make it!


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