Smoking - page 2

Any of your facilities smoke free? We will be pretty soon. I'm not a smoker and am a little glad that we will be cutting down on all the breaks, but on the other side....that means no smoking for... Read More

  1. by   Dixiedi
    My point was that non-smokers have the right to be smoke free far more often than smokers have the right to smoke. And that makes no sense because it has been definatively proven second hand smoke is no more dangerous to your health than many colognes are dangerous to my health. Annoying, smelly and aggrivating to a pre-exsisting condition. Oh that's so terrible.
    The states are continuing to whittle my freedoms away on the behalf of the noisey ones.
  2. by   jkaee
    Quote from donmomofnine
    I guess my point is that no one is "forcing" people to come to our non-smoking LTC! People do have a choice and they CHOOSE whether or not to live where I work! Smokers have freedom to live where they can smoke and nonsmokers have freedom to live (and work) smokefree.


    I don't want to get into the rights of smokers debate, but the problem is that almost every facility I have worked in or heard of is smoke free. So, it's really not an option for potential residents to just live somewhere else. I hate to think of some of the residents not being allowed to smoke, especially when one considers all they have already given up (freedom, independence, privacy, and sleep just to name a few), but as I said, it's not even an option in the places I've seen. I just think it's a double standard, we are drilled how this is their home, and the resident should be able to make as many decisions for themselves as they safely can, but yet they can't go and have a smoke if they want to, or they are forced to quit. Just doesn't seem fair to me, but I can see why many facilities choose to do this.
  3. by   Tweety
    ignore, sorry
  4. by   purplemania
    we are smoke free. Employees who smoke must go to their car to do so, or on the city sidewalk. Patients get patches. Visitors must go out on sidewalk or leave. Actually went better than I anticipated. Of course, I can remember when pts used to smoke in their room!
  5. by   mlolsonny
    I work PRN in a facility that got cited by state for not providing an indoor place for current smoking residents that should have been provided for. I guess according to MN Dept of Health, current residents who have had the opportunity to smoke indoors, must be "grandfathered" in and be given an indoor room to continue smoking indoors, even when a facility goes smoke-free.
  6. by   night owl
    Quote from Dixiedi
    If the state is now going to decide if I can smoke in my home or not I can only pray that I get hit by a train and squashed the day before I am forced to go into one of those "homes?"
    I totally agree.
  7. by   LPN4Life
    We keep our res cigs and lighter when they want to smoke we give them to them, and they go to their designated smoking area.
    I personally feel if a person chooses to smoke, they should be allowed a place to smoke. It is their home, it may not be health to go out and smoke then come in and ask for a breathing TX but that is their choice and we are their to serve them. Good monitoring of these people will allow them to be safe.

    And just because I smoke doesn't necessarily mean that I take more breaks that ones that don't. I take my scheduled breaks, and my staff does to, their is nothing saying that just because someone doesn't smoke, they can't leave the unit and go take a break too.
  8. by   CapeCodMermaid
    My facility provides an indoor room for residents who smoke...the size of a closet. Before they are allowed to use it, they have to have a safe smoking assessment done. .. a study in stupidity because everyone used to flunk...anyway.. if they are unsafe, they are supposed to be given a fire proof apron to wear and be monitored closely. When the CNA's complained about being in a smoky room, they put a window in the door. And, yes, we've had patients gasping their last breaths on O2 being brought down for a smoke.
  9. by   dosamigos76
    When the "non-smoking lobby" went after non-smoking sections in restaurants? They repeatedly stated that they "weren't trying to make establishments non-smoking, they just wanted a corner of the business"...

    Cheryl
  10. by   jude11142
    the date our facility went to No Smoking Facility. I don't think that is fair. For instance, we had woman who smokes and was admitted to this facility 2 days after the facility decided to become a no smoking and she was being forced to abide by that decision. She is A&O, and made a fuss about this and was able to smoke outside where we have a smoking allowed section. But now, the facility now makes it clear at the beginning of admission process that there is absolutely no smoking allowed on the grounds. They are asked to sign an official document that states they will abide by this rule. I know that many will disagree with this, but it's not fair to a human being who smokes to be denied that right when there is a smoking section. So, if a resident wants to come to this facility, there are forced to sign that part of the contract. Now, say this resident goes outside and she is sitting/socializing with other residents who were "grandfathered" in and are allowed to smoke. Sorry but that is wrong.

    Well, that's my opinion on this topic.

    JUDE
  11. by   nursedawn67
    We are not smoke free, we have smoking hours. That's when staff takes out some of the residents that choose to smoke and we let them smoke. Only outside in a specifically designated area.
  12. by   mlolsonny
    Quote from jude11142
    the facility now makes it clear at the beginning of admission process that there is absolutely no smoking allowed on the grounds. They are asked to sign an official document that states they will abide by this rule.

    JUDE

    Jude, there are smoking facilities. I know it may not be as convenient, but if the issue is that important to the resident, perhaps they choose a different facility that is more accommodating. It could turn out bad for business to be completely non-smoking, grounds and all.

    I know that the facility where I work will never allow indoor smoking. They never have and never will. But our one smoking resident is able to smoke outside in the employee area (more socialization) or on the front patio. She's a very courteous smoker and doesn't go out on the front patio to smoke when other residents are present.

    Our facility makes it crystal clear from the start that staff will never facilitate smoking (help someone unable to smoke independently) and smoking will never be allowed indoors. If the resident and family decide to place in our facility, they agree to those rules.
  13. by   smk1
    Quote from Dixiedi
    My point was that non-smokers have the right to be smoke free far more often than smokers have the right to smoke. And that makes no sense because it has been definatively proven second hand smoke is no more dangerous to your health than many colognes are dangerous to my health. Annoying, smelly and aggrivating to a pre-exsisting condition. Oh that's so terrible.
    The states are continuing to whittle my freedoms away on the behalf of the noisey ones.
    Where has it been definitively proven that second-hand smoke does no harm? this is news to me so if i have missed something i want to know. :uhoh21: (they are still teaching us just the opposite in school.) anyway even if this is true, a person who is just sitting there not smoking, is not affecting the air quality and the breathing response of the person sitting next to him, the way that a smoker affects those around him/her. Those are the simple facts and even if one wants to put it in the category of minor, silly annoyances, it still is disruptive enough to the quality of living for others around the person that it needs to be addressed. I do feel that a person should be able to smoke in their own home or "private" space, but I also am one of those people to whom most cigarrette smoke is "so terrible" that my eyes and nose pour and it brings out an asthma like response. So it bugs me when people complain that non-smokers are infringing on smokers rights. My choice not to smoke isn't causing anyone respiratory distress. A persons choice to smoke (in public spaces) DOES cause me and many other non-smokers respiratory distress. Maybe a compromise of sorts can be arranged in LTC, smokers can smoke only by their open window and with fan turned on blowing the smoke outside, or simply smoke outside. I am torn because it is their "home", but it is also by its very nature, a home with limitations, and has many "public" spaces and the ventilation system can carry the smoke into other areas. I feel bad that elderly people lose control over certain aspects of their life, but at the same time smoking has always been a choice that affects others, (people know that when they choose to start) so inmho the non-smokers right not to deal with the effects of smoke inhalation outweigh the smokers right to keep smoking in the facility.

close