SIMPLY PUT

  1. 0
    How do you explain to somewhat confused residents -without getting too technical -about certain meds they have when they want to know what they're for. So many meds are used off-label and for specific symptoms and trying to come up with simple answers for psych meds, antidepressants and so forth can be challenging. And sometimes they don't want to hear the truth, for example, if you're telling them they're taking an antidepressant they will get indignant and say "I am not depressed! Whose idea was this, my doctor?"
    You get the drift...
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  3. 7 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I've had residents say something about that, but usually about pain meds. I would respond, "yes, it was prescribed by your physician. You might not feel depressed right now and that's because it helps keep your mood up."
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    I've heard a few suggestions at work about a particular resident who likes to pick and choose and question incessantly the same meds and I was told that 'if you tell her this is that she'll take it'. Somehow I don't quite feel comfortable telling her one med is another if it's not.
  6. 2
    I often say "I have brought you your vitamins today" or "you know how those Drs can be but we have to do as they say to stay healthy" but I work on a dementia unit. Another one that works well is "your daughter __ wants you to take them"
    Forever Sunshine and michelle126 like this.
  7. 2
    I use the term vitamins too. I also have a women that I tell her that they are to keep her beautiful, because I wouldn't want to be jealous of anyone else. Unfortunately, if I work a twelve, that same line doesn't work at dinner.
    Forever Sunshine and SleeepyRN like this.
  8. 1
    Each resident may have to be treated / approached individually.

    A significant advantage will be to have developed a comfortable relationship with the residents prior to having to deal with them on any specific issues.

    General principle for me: Keep things simple, light... and to remain pleasant. If the discussion starts to go wrong, divert away from the topic smoothly... or introduce some humor. If that doesn't work, back-off and come back to the matter at a little later time.

    Good luck!
    MoopleRN likes this.
  9. 3
    I guess it's better to tell a little white lie than try to explain what Seroquel does...
    Forever Sunshine, JZ_RN, and MoopleRN like this.
  10. 0
    "This is your happy pill" works for one lady. Might not sound too PC, but she tells everyone.."I like to be happy"


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