R-e-s-p-e-c-t

  1. http://humanresources.about.com/od/w...mo_respect.htm

    How to Demonstrate Respect at Work

    Ask anyone in your workplace what treatment they most want at work. They will likely top their list with the desire to be treated with dignity and respect. Popular songs tout the need for respect.
    From Aretha Franklin:
    “R-E-S-P-E-C-T
    Find out what it means to me.”
    to Train:
    “Everybody needs a little respect
    Everybody needs a little time
    Everybody needs a little respect
    Everybody needs a little.”
    Everybody needs a little respect. You know when you have respect. You know when you don’t. But what is respect really? And, how is respect demonstrated at work?

    Treat people with courtesy, politeness, and kindness and you will have respect. You know when you don’t. But what is respect really? And, how is respect demonstrated at work? You can demonstrate respect with simple, yet powerful actions. These ideas will help you avoid needless, insensitive, unmeant disrespect, too.
    • Treat people with courtesy, politeness, and kindness.
    • Encourage coworkers to express opinions and ideas.
    • Listen to what others have to say before expressing your viewpoint.
      Never speak over, butt in, or cut off another person.
    • Use people’s ideas to change or improve work. Let employees know you used their idea, or, better yet, encourage the person with the idea to implement the idea.
    • Never insult people, name call, disparage or put down people or their ideas.
    • Do not nit-pick, constantly criticize over little things, belittle, judge, demean or patronize. A series of seemingly trivial actions, added up over time, constitutes bullying.
    • Treat people the same no matter their race, religion, gender, size, age, or country of origin. Implement policies and procedures consistently so people feel that they are treated fairly and equally. Treating people differently can constitute harassment or a hostile work environment.
    • Include all coworkers in meetings, discussions, training, and events. While not every person can participate in every activity, do not marginalize, exclude or leave any one person out. Provide an equal opportunity for employees to participate in committees, task forces, or continuous improvement teams. Solicit volunteers and try to involve every volunteer.
    • Praise much more frequently than you criticize. Encourage praise and recognition from employee to employee as well as from the supervisor.
    • The golden rule does apply at work, or, as professional speaker Leslie Charles, says, “Implement the platinum rule: treat others as they wish to be treated.”
    There are many other ways to demonstrate respect at work. These ten constitute a solid foundation. Implemented consistently at work, these respectful actions help ensure a respectful, considerate, professional work place.
    Last edit by Simplepleasures on Feb 25, '08
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   flightnurse2b
    Quote from ingelein
    • Treat people the same no matter their race, religion, gender, size, age, or country of origin. Implement policies and procedures consistently so people feel that they are treated fairly and equally. Treating people differently can constitute harassment or a hostile work environment.
    • Include all coworkers in meetings, discussions, training, and events. While not every person can participate in every activity, do not marginalize, exclude or leave any one person out. Provide an equal opportunity for employees to participate in committees, task forces, or continuous improvement teams. Solicit volunteers and try to involve every volunteer.
    • Praise much more frequently than you criticize. Encourage praise and recognition from employee to employee as well as from the supervisor.
    • The golden rule does apply at work, or, as professional speaker Leslie Charles, says, "Implement the platinum rule: treat others as they wish to be treated."
    There are many other ways to demonstrate respect at work. These ten constitute a solid foundation. Implemented consistently at work, these respectful actions help ensure a respectful, considerate, professional work place.
    thank you for posting this. i am planning on printing it out and bringing it to work. i am always in the middle of an argument because the ladies i work with are trying to convert me to come to their church as well as lecture me about how liberals and yankees are ruining this country. the more i beg them to leave politics and religion outside of the workplace, the more literature i get.
  4. by   Midwest4me
    Quote from flightnurse2b
    ... the more i beg them to leave politics and religion outside of the workplace, the more literature i get.
    I can sympathize. Although I don't get literature, a co-worker leaves hers around a LOT on our shift and has been seen talking with co-workers frequently on work time about her faith. She also does this with patients!

    She defends her discussions with: "we are RESPONSIBLE to spread the word and convert others." As a Christian I agree with sharing information BUT I've seen more come to Christ through gentle demonstrations than through shoving the info down people's throats.Her reference to Christmas as a "pagan" holiday was offensive to several of us. She honestly looked like she'd never heard the phrase: "you don't talk politics or religion at work" as she asked "WHY NOT? That's where it's most important!!!!"
  5. by   Riseupandnurse
    Respect is very important, yes!! This is what I would want to show respect from management for its nurses:
    Do NOT give us any more baskets of candy as a thank you for working overtime, short-staffed, good Press Ganeys, etc. Many of us aren't supposed to be eating it anyway, and I think it's condescending.
    Let us make some REAL decisions, not just where to put the refrigerator, etc.
    Do not buy new types of syringes, bottles of saline, etc. and drop it from the sky. Give us some kind of warning before we open those drawers in front of patients.
    No more scripting!!! If an individual nurse needs help with "customer relations", help that nurse. But let those of us who do care try our best to be warm and genuine.
    Do not put things on our yearly evals unless you have discussed problems with us first and given us a chance to change for the better.
    Don't do paperwork when we are in your office trying to tell you about a problem. Nothing says, "I wish you'd just leave" more clearly.
    When a patient has a complaint about a staff member, get their side too before making up your mind.

    LISTEN TO US!! And for those who read this post, thank YOU for listening.

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