Working in Nursing School--is it possible? - page 3

Hi All-- I'm posting on behalf of a friend. She's in her mid-20s and has been putting herself through community college pre-req classes by working midnights and taking 10-12 credits per semester.... Read More

  1. by   kathywv
    I worked full time through my AD program as an LPN (wasnt supposed to the school had a rule about how many hours one could work but they wernt paying my bills), worked full time in my BSN program as well as married and had 2 children...and worked full time during my MSN program and commuted 1 and a half hours one way twice a week to school, had two small children at home.....

    It can be done.....anything can be done if you want it bad enough!
  2. by   cajunnga
    [font=Courier New]Hey. I work third shift, children, husband, nursing school, grocery store, cooking, bill paying-- I pray a lot. Hospitals love to give nursing students scholarships, has your friend applied for one? That would help her a lot. Mine is paying for all required books and tuition. Hope this helps.
    Quote from Pachinko
    Hi All--

    I'm posting on behalf of a friend. She's in her mid-20s and has been putting herself through community college pre-req classes by working midnights and taking 10-12 credits per semester.

    She'll soon tranfer into an accredited college where she'll go through a traditional three-year nursing program. She's had a hard time saving up for this and is concerned about having to take out loans for living expenses on top of loans for tuition and books. She doesn't have family who can help her financially and is wondering whether she will be able to work during this period. Scholarships and grants will cover some of her school expenses, but she needs to bring in at least some money for the basics: rent, food, etc. She also wants to avoid being in a big debt hole when she graduates.

    Is working during nursing school possible, or is the curriculum so intense that it precludes work? Also, at what points can nursing students start utilizing some of the skills they've picked up in school to earn a decent wage in a health-care environment?

    My friend's working very hard and I know she'll make it, but any insight you might have would ease her mind and be a big help. Thank you!
  3. by   Energizer Bunny
    I just got a job offer today for something I really wanted until I got into the RN program for the fall. Now, it wouldn't pay for me to work there. It would until I went to school and had to pay for childcare for 55 hours a week (I would actually be paying out more than I would be making). *sigh* I am just going to have to find a waitressing job a few nights a week that I can hopefully work around my husbands schedule.
  4. by   opalmRN
    Quote from Pachinko
    Hi All--
    Is working during nursing school possible, or is the curriculum so intense that it precludes work? Also, at what points can nursing students start utilizing some of the skills they've picked up in school to earn a decent wage in a health-care environment?
    I work full time and go to school full time. I am in a med/surg rotation and do my clinical evenings and weekends. I am married and have three children.

    It can be done however, everyone's situation is different. My children are older the youngest is in HS hence they are all pretty self sufficient. I have a very long commute and on clinical nights I get 3-4 hours of sleep. I have no social life other than my family. At times even I can't stand myself. Our house is organized but not necessarily "clean." Everyone pulls their fair share and we have lots of rules.

    I admire those with small children in nursing school working or not. Young children require so much energy which I know I would not have to give. My husband is also a key to my success. He does the grocery shopping (OK I have to make a list) and anything else I don't have time to do which helps me from complete melt down some days.

    Only the individual in the situation knows whether or not they can work and go to nursing school. It is a tremendous amount of work but many are doing it.
    Last edit by opalmRN on Mar 20, '04
  5. by   vwgirl
    I worked midnight to six am in radio as a DJ, then went to school during the day. I was so sleep deprived that I drove my car into the side of a convenience store on my way to buy a cup of coffee! Broke my nose and the car needed a new radiator, but the stitches on my face impressed the scholarship committee I face the following day; they gave me a full scholarship, so at least my tuition/books/uniforms were paid for. My final year in nursing school my husband went to jail for four months and I had to work extra to manage without his income. My class voted me "least likely to graduate on time" and I think they were pretty shocked when I succeeded!
  6. by   Pachinko
    Thanks, everyone, for these thoughtful responses. I've referred my friend to this thread for advice and inspiration. Seems like the general answer here is: "Yes, you can work in nursing school, but it ain't fun!"
  7. by   newgrad2004
    Yes you can but I wouldnt suggest full time or 12 hour shiifts either.
    Again I will say it resturant work, server, cocktailing, bartenting is quick easy money.
  8. by   Havin' A Party!
    If it's any consolation, I'll be working while doing clinicals too.

    May cut back some depending on how it goes.
  9. by   RedSox33RN
    I haven't decided if I will try to work during nursing school. Probably not, as I don't work now. But I will probably try to work as a CNA over the summer if I'm not taking a course.

    A hospital near me has a student nurse extern program during summers. It's a hospital I would love to work at after I graduate, so I may look into that for next (2005) summer. That would be a sweet deal!
  10. by   RedSox33RN
    Quote from vwgirl
    I worked midnight to six am in radio as a DJ, then went to school during the day. I was so sleep deprived that I drove my car into the side of a convenience store on my way to buy a cup of coffee! Broke my nose and the car needed a new radiator, but the stitches on my face impressed the scholarship committee I face the following day; they gave me a full scholarship, so at least my tuition/books/uniforms were paid for. My final year in nursing school my husband went to jail for four months and I had to work extra to manage without his income. My class voted me "least likely to graduate on time" and I think they were pretty shocked when I succeeded!
    WOW!!! I'm glad you're okay! What a way to get a scholarship! They probably thought they'd heard everything too. :chuckle
  11. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I probably would moon the people that voted me "least likely to graduate on time" right on graduation day.
  12. by   LilRedRN1973
    One of my classmates works 12 hours shifts, full time in the nearby prison and attends our full time program. He does get a bit tired occasionally on his first day in clinicals as he's coming off a 12 hours shift from the previous night. And he's got a child. But he's pulling one of the highest grades in the class, so it can be done.

    I'm somewhere in the middle of our class, grade-wise. I have 2 small children who are NOT self sufficient, work 24 hours a week in the hospital, and am in school Mon-Thurs all day long. It sucks and I hate that I never seem to have time for ME, but I know it's only temporary. Oh, and I HATE the weight I've gained!!! I waited tables for 10 years prior to nursing school and all that running around really kept the weight off. I would NEVER go back to waiting tables, but I do miss the smaller sized me!!!
  13. by   BSN2004NSU
    Well, I'm working in nursing school, but I only work on the weekends. The key is find an employer that is willing to work with you, and don't take "no" for an answer because school comes first.

    Good Luck

close