Why Not Just Do A Bsn Program??? - page 3

I'm sure that I am going to get ripped for this one but I am just curious. Whats the point of doing an ADN program? I mean, are you really going to be as competent as a BSN nurse? Considering the... Read More

  1. by   smk1
    Quote from HU_nurse
    Not sure if I understand LIzz...anyways, I also want to hear from ADN student: how many of you actually finish in 2 years? and if its gonna take u three, then why not do a 4 yr program?
    because the credits at community colleges are far cheaper than at a university or private college, so only one "extra" year at a 4 yr institution may end up costing as much or more than the previous 3 at a community college. I am going for my bsn but am finishing everything that i can at the community college first because it is more cost effective.
  2. by   Cherish
    There is no pay difference from ADN vs. BSN prepared nurses, same thing for diploma RN's! Surprise, surprise, when you graduate from nursing school...you will not get paid more. Happened to a friend of mine who graduated from John Hopkins school of nursing, she thought oh well since shes a John Hopkins grad. (which is considered to be the Harvard of Medical schools), everyone would bow down and kiss her feet, and pay her more money, lol (its over 20-25k, for that school a year). She was working with diploma RN's, ADN, and BSN and was NEVER treated differently, or paid differently, because in the end result your an RN! She even admitted that diploma RN's actually were the BEST nurse she's ever seen. She told me that she would of never went to Johns Hopkins, cause of all the student loans she has now (she's averaging 40-45k salary). She does want to be a NP though, but said if she went ADN then BSN, it would of been more cheaper and logical, then John Hopkins. Also, some people do the ADN route because its closer, BSN programs are not vastly around, some states you have to drive 2-3 hrs to one, compared to a CC which may be right around the corner, and way cheaper (2-3k a yr, vs. the typical 6-28k a yr for BSN). So it depends on financially if you want to graduate and NOT worry about student loans, and traveling far, which adds stress while your a student (don't think u need anymore stress as a student). There are some Rn-BSN programs where u can get a BSN in 15 mths, or a RN-BSN/MSN in 24 mths. So since this issue will never be resolved, there are MANY reason y people choose the route they choose. It's the individual who chooses which is BETTER for them, not what people think. If that's the case then people would choose other fields of healthcare, than nursing, since people presumely think that nurses are female, maids for patients (I've actually heard that!!!). Kinda tired of people labeling people, all in the end, your still a 'nurse', (and most people don't think thats a great career to begin with, you know who I'm talking about)
  3. by   HU_nurse
    Well, thanks for all who responded and enlighted me on this subject. I have been clarified as far as learning that ADN's are just as competent and BSN"s. I have also realized that a lot of you chose that route due to financial restaints and I can most definetly understand that. As far as the pay scale, I think that it is really unfair that ADN nurses get paid just as much as BSN nurses. This really undermines my efforts. What is the incentive for me to enroll in a 4 year program if it costs more and I would only wind up getting paid the same as someone who went to school for less time than I did and paid less tuition for it. That really sucks! Before long there will be no more BSN nurses...whats the point? Even ADN's have to agree with this. I mean, after all MSN prepared nurses get paid more than BSN nurses, DR's get paid more than MSN nurses, LPN's make more than CNA"s etc. More education usually equates to better pay. SO whats up with that?!?!?!
  4. by   klone
    Quote from HU_nurse
    As far as the pay scale, I think that it is really unfair that ADN nurses get paid just as much as BSN nurses. This really undermines my efforts. What is the incentive for me to enroll in a 4 year program if it costs more and I would only wind up getting paid the same as someone who went to school for less time than I did and paid less tuition for it. That really sucks! Before long there will be no more BSN nurses...whats the point? Even ADN's have to agree with this. I mean, after all MSN prepared nurses get paid more than BSN nurses, DR's get paid more than MSN nurses, LPN's make more than CNA"s etc. More education usually equates to better pay. SO whats up with that?!?!?!
    A BSN has more opportunities for advancement. In addition, when applying to a Master's program, the school does look at what school you attended, how tough the courses are, etc. They may look more favorably on a BSN graduate from a prestigious school than a CC graduate who did an online RN-BSN program later on.

    No, there will never be a time when there will be no more BSN graduates, for the reasons mentioned above. Not everyone wants to be "just" a floor nurse, and you need a BSN if you want to advance.
  5. by   smk1
    Quote from HU_nurse
    Well, thanks for all who responded and enlighted me on this subject. I have been clarified as far as learning that ADN's are just as competent and BSN"s. I have also realized that a lot of you chose that route due to financial restaints and I can most definetly understand that. As far as the pay scale, I think that it is really unfair that ADN nurses get paid just as much as BSN nurses. This really undermines my efforts. What is the incentive for me to enroll in a 4 year program if it costs more and I would only wind up getting paid the same as someone who went to school for less time than I did and paid less tuition for it. That really sucks! Before long there will be no more BSN nurses...whats the point? Even ADN's have to agree with this. I mean, after all MSN prepared nurses get paid more than BSN nurses, DR's get paid more than MSN nurses, LPN's make more than CNA"s etc. More education usually equates to better pay. SO whats up with that?!?!?!
    on one hand i agree with you that more education "usually" equals more pay, and in general i think that it "should", however the issue is that if a bsn nurse is hired as a nurse in the same capacity of a adn nurse(they are doing the exact same job) why would one get paid significantly more than the other? lpns make more than cna's because they hold a completely different job, same for rns versus lpns,mds, versus rn etc...
  6. by   Cherish
    As far as the pay scale, I think that it is really unfair that ADN nurses get paid just as much as BSN nurses. This really undermines my efforts. What is the incentive for me to enroll in a 4 year program if it costs more and I would only wind up getting paid the same as someone who went to school for less time than I did and paid less tuition for it. That really sucks! Before long there will be no more BSN nurses...whats the point? Even ADN's have to agree with this. I mean, after all MSN prepared nurses get paid more than BSN nurses, DR's get paid more than MSN nurses, LPN's make more than CNA"s etc. More education usually equates to better pay. SO whats up with that?!?!?!
    Well I think the reason y is because nursing is a Female dominated career, (can you hear the feminism coming out lol). If this was a male dominated career, or 50/50, there would be different pay scales, for everything! Sadly that isnt so, I understand Klone when he/she (sorry) said that they understand about the starting out pay and then gradually getting paid more, because I too was in the military (now a veteran) and thats how it is there also. Sorry to say it but BSN program has been around for more than 20+ yrs, so if it hasnt changed now, and people havent getting paid more then.....hmmm
  7. by   lilagirl
    Quote from HU_nurse
    I'm not looking for "info." What I am asking is for the opinion of ADN students and why they chose that route rather than the BSN route and do they think that they can be just as competent as a BSN nurse...
    I am attending an ADN program because I will have summer off. The BSN program that is nearest to me goes during the summer and I can't afford to go to school and pay for full time child care for 3 kids. I plan to do the online RN to BSN eventually....
  8. by   Kabin
    Quote from klone
    I don't agree that this is that uncommon. In most fields where there is a set pay scale (such as with the government), you start out at the lowest end of the pay scale when you're first hired, regardless of where you went to school, what your school grades were, etc. You just need to have the minimum qualifications in order to be eligible for the job. Having worked in the government for a good part of my life, this is not unusual to me.
    This is a big time difference for me, as I'm career changing from a technical business world to nursing. Try to consider anything other than government/socialized jobs where taxes are redistributed to a workforce and government entities determine salaries. Afterall, HMOs and hospitals need to make money, so most are not "non-profit organizations."

    Any other form of free market derived employment where a degree is required, employers fall over themselves to get the best talent available before the competition does. How do they determine the best talent? Schools attended, degrees acheived, and GPAs.

    There must be another way that nursing rewards better candidates. Perhaps more challenging work, such as in ICU or OR, provides more rewarding pay?
  9. by   HU_nurse
    Quote from smkoepke
    on one hand i agree with you that more education "usually" equals more pay, and in general i think that it "should", however the issue is that if a bsn nurse is hired as a nurse in the same capacity of a adn nurse(they are doing the exact same job) why would one get paid significantly more than the other? lpns make more than cna's because they hold a completely different job, same for rns versus lpns,mds, versus rn etc...
    Well then maybe that's the problem, that BSN's are hired under the capacity. I mean think about it, there must be something that I learned as a BSN nurse that an ADN nurse didnt learn b/c i went to school longer. I mean ADN nurses only go to school about a year longer that LPN's and yet they still make more. No matter how you slice it, its not fair and that is why I will only do my required one year of bedside nursing and go further in my education....there will always be a shortage as long as we use this kind of logic...*sighs...
  10. by   manna
    People choose ADN vs BSN for a variety of reasons - evidence by the posters here.

    I, personally, am enrolling in a BSN program this fall. It's not any closer or further to my house than the ADN programs (60 miles one way). It actually will end up being cheaper for me to attend because of generous transfer scholarships and grants. But mostly I've ended up in a BSN program because I did not decide on being a nursing major until I'd already completely most all of my pre-reqs. Seemed as if I'd be going backwards to get the ADN by that time....
  11. by   Kabin
    I was surpsirsed to hear this with the supposed nursing shortage, but I've heard some hospital/organizations now only hire BSNs.
  12. by   Cherish
    Have you ever compared more or less the syllabus, or what the two are learning? What I mean is that BSN, is more theory orientated, then clinical orientated, ADN usually has more clinical rotation and more hours than BSN. Also, BSN sometimes takes leadership or management classes, some BSN's just incorporate the liberal degree more into there program without additional classes. Sometimes some BSN, just incorporate the prereq. into the degree (there are some BSN schools where you can apply straight from highschool, WITHOUT doing any prereq's) so how is the employer supposed to assume that you were taught more than the ADN, or diploma RN? There are different BSN programs, and the way the format is differs from state to state college to college, some private some public. ADN usually have a more relational format vs. BSN programs, as is diploma. I am not in a diploma program, but if I was to be HR Manager (I think schools to me need way more clinicals), then diploma RN should get paid more, since its 3 yrs of clinicals, nothing else.
  13. by   jemommyRN
    I had the option to obtain a BSN in a year and a half ( I already have a degree) or get my ADN in two years. I chose the ADN program because its the best program in my state. The BSN program doesn't do as much clinical preparation as the adn program does. I want the best education and experience. Doesn't really matter how long it takes.

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