What you wish you knew before starting nursing school - page 4

Hello guys! Recently, I have been looking at threads in the career section of allnurses and I noticed a disturbing trend. Namely, that there is a big disconnect to what the internet says about job... Read More

  1. Visit  all517 profile page
    1
    Take time for yourself. That exam question that requires critical thinking will be much easier to figure out if you've slept a least 4 hours. Figure out a regular studying pattern ASAP- home, library, with others, alone? Memorize normal lab values ASAP. Be confident on patho- I have found it a much easier time when my clinical instructor is drilling me about a patient that I am able to walk through the WHYs? And critically think what is priority and what I'm going to do about it. A solid patho background eliminates you fumbling around with those unnecessary papers and books in your pockets. Have thick skin and always be aware of what you do and don't know. ASK QUESTIONS! Don't pretend you know something in a clinical setting if you don't, it's dangerous. Spend as much time in your patients room as you can just chatting with them. Leave your troubles in the car when walking into the hospital- give every rotation 100%, even if you think it's not the speciality for you. Find carpools and study groups... You learn a ton from others experiences. Never say "I don't know", if you're not sure of something, go in your patients room and check on it. You may not know, but your instructor wants to see that you can figure the problem out yourself and have options as to why you think that is so. Keep your friends and family close. If someone tells you they think they're going to throw up... They are.
    quirkyvanilla likes this.
  2. Visit  sugarmagnoliaRN profile page
    0
    Quote from all517
    Take time for yourself. That exam question that requires critical thinking will be much easier to figure out if you've slept a least 4 hours. Figure out a regular studying pattern ASAP- home, library, with others, alone? Memorize normal lab values ASAP. Be confident on patho- I have found it a much easier time when my clinical instructor is drilling me about a patient that I am able to walk through the WHYs? And critically think what is priority and what I'm going to do about it. A solid patho background eliminates you fumbling around with those unnecessary papers and books in your pockets. Have thick skin and always be aware of what you do and don't know. ASK QUESTIONS! Don't pretend you know something in a clinical setting if you don't, it's dangerous. Spend as much time in your patients room as you can just chatting with them. Leave your troubles in the car when walking into the hospital- give every rotation 100%, even if you think it's not the speciality for you. Find carpools and study groups... You learn a ton from others experiences. Never say "I don't know", if you're not sure of something, go in your patients room and check on it. You may not know, but your instructor wants to see that you can figure the problem out yourself and have options as to why you think that is so. Keep your friends and family close. If someone tells you they think they're going to throw up... They are.

    Best answer yet!! All true!
  3. Visit  nrsintrning profile page
    1
    Quote from all517
    If someone tells you they think they're going to throw up... They are.
    haha...love this!
    nyteshade likes this.
  4. Visit  margritamix profile page
    0
    Thanks for all the thoughts and comments!
  5. Visit  decembergrad2011 profile page
    2
    As a student: Say thank you and mean it to everyone you encounter that helps you in the least little way. Be appreciative of those who take the time out of their busy day to show you something, let you pass meds or perform a procedure even though it takes you a lot longer, or answers your questions. This profession can often be thankless and people deserve to know that they've made a difference to you. Even the gruff, standoffish, and mean nurses like to hear a thank you. Treat your techs with respect and ask, don't tell, them to do something. They are with the patients just as much if not more than nurses and perform a tough job for a fraction of the pay. They also are the ones who will be helping you clean up patients, find the linen cart, and navigate the supply room. Appreciate them for their role.

    For when you graduate: The one piece of advice I will give to you is to NEVER forget what it is like to be a student and take the time to mentor them when you're a full-fledged nurse. Likewise, NEVER forget the first time a patient makes you feel like it's all worthwhile. It will keep you going even on the rough days.

    What I wish I had known before nursing school: It all comes together at the end. As many others have described on here, one day I simply realized, "OMG I know stuff! I'm smart! I'm a nurse!" After all the care plans, exams, skills demonstrations, clinical mistakes, and countless hours studying, I realized that it all was a part in making me the nurse I am today. It will happen for you, too. Don't worry about how or when it will happen. I know this is fruitless to say because you will worry since there is so much material and so much stress in school. But keep in mind that one day it will and you will not always feel so lost and incompetent.
    quirkyvanilla and nurseclm like this.
  6. Visit  ♑ Capricorn ♑ profile page
    2
    Gonna keep mine short and sweet. Alot of good ones have already been mentioned. My ultimate one piece of advice is to stay positive.
    quirkyvanilla and nurseclm like this.

Need Help Searching For Someone's Comment? Enter your keywords in the box below and we will display any comment that matches your keywords.



Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Top
close
close