What should I do - Abusive Instructor

  1. Hi, I need some advice. I have an instructor who is repeatedly abusive. She has over 30 years of experience and constantly harasses students. If it is not done her way, then she will fail them. I don't think this is fair when students only have had maybe 5 days to learn. I don't think we should run to the dean for everything, but I don't believe students should be in a hostile environment. I can't handle the stress anymore. I know instructors have experience, I do too (a little, maybe not 20 years), but I know things aren't done in the real world as they are done in nursing school. I know to do things by the book in nursing school, however, I know it's not fair. Whatever.

    This instructor is betraying (sorry, for lack of a better word), 'she knows but does't tell'. I don't believe new and innocent students should be exposed to that. Students with good intentions and maybe with awkward techniques, be exposed to that evil. I want to go to the dean (or whoever) for harassment. She has favorites so I don't think students have a fair shot. Maybe take other legal measures. I am putting effort in to this. Should I just withdraw? What are the consequences of all this?
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  2. 56 Comments

  3. by   Rocknurse
    I'm saying this in the nicest way I know how, and without malice. Suck it up, buttercup. It's not fair. Nothing is fair. In time you will find this out. Head down, chin up, do what you're told and do what is required. Nursing school makes an adult of you. Nursing is tough. At least this way you'll experience that before you get to a floor. There are lessons to be learned here. Use them well and try your hardest. Don't take it personally. Your professor has probably taught a million students just like you, and will teach a million more. Just trust in the process.
  4. by   fibroblast
    Quote from Rocknurse
    I'm saying this in the nicest way I know how, and without malice. Suck it up, buttercup. It's not fair. Nothing is fair. In time you will find this out. Head down, chin up, do what you're told and do what is required. Nursing school makes an adult of you. Nursing is tough. At least this way you'll experience that before you get to a floor. There are lessons to be learned here. Use them well and try your hardest. Don't take it personally. Your professor has probably taught a million students just like you, and will teach a million more. Just trust in the process.
    Sorry, it's nurses like you that I don't want to deal with. That attitude is precisely what I don't find attractive. To me that is what nursing has become. A profession that nurses 'lack compassion to other's'. I fear that your 'patients' have an personal issue or medical trauma, you may not respond in professional way. Poor patients! Nurses have become heartless, just as you have responded. Please refrain from responding to my posts if you can't make a better assessment.
    Last edit by fibroblast on Mar 24
  5. by   Rocknurse
    Quote from fibroblast
    Sorry, it's nurses like you that I don't want to deal with. That attitude is precisely what I don't find attractive. To me that is what nursing has become. A profession that nurses 'lack compassion to other's'. I fear that your 'patients' have an personal issue or medical trauma, you may not respond in professional way. Poor patients! Nurses have become heartless, just as you have responded. Please refrain from responding to my posts if you can't make a better assessment.
    Really? You call my professionalism into question because you don't hear what you want to hear? Lol. Ok then. My 25 year career is not worried by your opinion of it in the least. Good luck in school.
  6. by   AnnPerkins
    Quote from fibroblast
    Hi, I need some advice. I have an instructor who is repeatedly abusive. She has over 30 years of experience and constantly harasses students. If it is not done her way, then she will fail them. I don't think this is fair when students only have had maybe 5 days to learn. I don't think we should run to the dean for everything, but I don't believe students should be in a hostile environment. I can't handle the stress anymore. I know instructors have experience, I do too (a little, maybe not 20 years), but I know things aren't done in the real world as they are done in nursing school. I know to do things by the book in nursing school, however, I know it's not fair. Whatever.

    This instructor is betraying (sorry, for lack of a better word), 'she knows but does't tell'. I don't believe new and innocent students should be exposed to that. Students with good intentions and maybe with awkward techniques, be exposed to that evil. I want to go to the dean (or whoever) for harassment. She has favorites so I don't think students have a fair shot. Maybe take other legal measures. I am putting effort in to this. Should I just withdraw? What are the consequences of all this?
    So.....do it her way?
  7. by   fibroblast
    Quote from Rocknurse
    Really? You call my professionalism into question because you don't hear what you want to hear? Lol. Ok then. My 25 year career is not worried by your opinion of it in the least. Good luck in school.
    Sorry, but 'hearing what I want' is not an option for me. I work very hard in my nursing program, and if I am not the only student who has a problem with this professor, then it is not 'just my problem'. Maybe I can avoid this professor from this day forward, and never ever speak to this professor again, fine with me, but then 'you'll' tell me, 'that's not an option'.

    I do absolutely question your professionalism. I wouldn't want a nurse with that attitude. 25 years or 3 years, it is not appropriate to respond to someone with a real issue, whether rational or irrational, not using their name and to infer that aren't strong enough. You learned that in nursing school

    I can't imagine being so sick that I can't even get up, and having someone tell me 'suck it up'. No wonder why there are so many complaints about quality of care. It's poor quality and downright unethical. Why should someone with a 25 year career be 'spared', if they don't spare a 'student'? I'm not understanding. I respect professionals, but if they don't own up, and practice what they preach, I'm not on the same page.
    Last edit by fibroblast on Mar 24
  8. by   ItsThatJenGirl
    Quote from fibroblast
    Sorry, but 'hearing what I want' is not an option for me. I work very hard in my nursing program, and if I am not the only student who has a problem with this professor, then it is not 'just my problem'. Maybe I can avoid this professor from this day forward, and never ever speak to this professor again, fine with me, but then 'you'll' tell me, 'that's not an option'.

    I do absolutely question your professionalism. I wouldn't want a nurse with that attitude. 25 years or 3 years, it is not appropriate to respond to someone with a real issue, whether rational or irrational, not using their name and to infer that aren't strong enough. You learned that in nursing school

    I can't imagine being so sick that I can't even get up, and having someone tell me 'suck it up'. No wonder why there are so many complaints about quality of care. It's poor quality and downright unethical. Why should someone with a 25 year career be 'spared', if they don't spare a 'student'? I'm not understanding. I respect professionals, but if they don't own up, and practice what they preach, I'm not on the same page.
    Just because she (he? sorry) posts a certain way does not, in ANY way indicate how she treats her patients. That's a ridiculous assumption.

    She's telling you to suck it up because you're going to come across these types of people throughout your life. She's not inferring you're weak, she's saying that this is a skill you have to learn to be successful. You can't control or change people, you can only control or change how you react to them.

    If you feel like this is not a situation where using that skill would be beneficial, you can certainly try to go to the dean if you feel like that's the correct choice. In my experience most teachers do expect you to do things their way, because it's their class. You can always try this and maybe learn a few new things.

    Regardless, I'm sorry you're feeling so stressed. Good luck.
  9. by   RNNPICU
    Fibroblast:
    What issues and problems are you having specifically? Nursing school has specific standards and checkoffs that have to be met at a certain standard. Sometimes there are certain things you have to do according to your instructor and according to unit policies. There are some procedures if not done in a certain way can jeopardize your school's ability to have clinical at that hospital.

    There really only may be 5 days to learn because there is a lot of material to cover. That is just the realities of nursing school. There is not always time to wait.

    You have not posted any examples of what has occurred so it is difficult to determine what has exactly gone on during your clinical.
  10. by   fibroblast
    Quote from ItsThatJenGirl
    Just because she (he? sorry) posts a certain way does not, in ANY way indicate how she treats her patients. That's a ridiculous assumption.

    She's telling you to suck it up because you're going to come across these types of people throughout your life. She's not inferring you're weak, she's saying that this is a skill you have to learn to be successful. You can't control or change people, you can only control or change how you react to them.

    If you feel like this is not a situation where using that skill would be beneficial, you can certainly try to go to the dean if you feel like that's the correct choice. In my experience most teachers do expect you to do things their way, because it's their class. You can always try this and maybe learn a few new things.

    Regardless, I'm sorry you're feeling so stressed. Good luck.
    It does indicate her attitude toward her patients. That's evident.
  11. by   Rocknurse
    Quote from fibroblast
    It does indicate her attitude toward her patients. That's evident.
    I think this says much more about your ability to handle school than it does about my professionalism actually. I've been a nurse for longer than you've been alive most likely and not a single complaint from any patient. When, and if, you become a nurse, you might want to understand that if you start to attack others professionalism whenever you receive constructive criticism, you will be required to pay the consequences and it won't be pretty. My advice is sound. Whether or not you choose to take it is up to you, but should you not, expect a difficult career.
  12. by   fibroblast
    We have different clinical instructors and they all teach a different ways. You are unfortunate to get the bad apple. I understand there are standards, the whole deal, but when professors don't own up to those standards, don't teach to those standards, students have standards to, to let you know, we expect teachers to meet standards also.
    Last edit by fibroblast on Mar 24
  13. by   ItsThatJenGirl
    Quote from fibroblast
    It does indicate her attitude toward her patients. That's evident.
    It's quite telling that that's all you've taken away from my post.
  14. by   AnnPerkins
    So far you've spoken very vaguely about "standards" and "betrayal," but you have yet to give specific examples of how this instructor is making your life so difficult.

    If you do go to the dean, you may want to come up with something a little more concrete.
    Last edit by AnnPerkins on Mar 24 : Reason: Fat thumbs

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What should I do - Abusive Instructor