Threatened dismissal because of wrinkly clothes :0( - page 4

Hey everyone, I was just trying to get some opinions of an incident that happened to me recently. I was pulled aside by the director of my nursing program, and was told that if I wore wrinkly... Read More

  1. by   Nurse-To-Be-Joy
    All I have t osay is, PLEASE use deodorant!!!! Not very people, but a few people DON'T use it, and then they don't realize that they STINK after a couple hours. And when I'm a patient, I sure hope that my nurse doesn't have bad BO!
  2. by   Princess74
    I don't care what anyone thinks but not wearing deodorant is gross. No one wants to smell your BO. Anyone, especially someone working with the public, in the healthcare field to boot should know better.
    Geesh, whats next a nurse who doesn't believe in mouthwash or breath mints. GROSS! I'm not trying to be mean but why would you go out in public knowing that you stink?? As far as the douching goes, I agree with Marie, TMI.

    To the OP, good luck with staying wrinkle free. Try hanging your uniform in the bathroom, turn on the hot water and steam up the room, it helps to get the wrinkles out.
    Last edit by Princess74 on Sep 24, '06
  3. by   SoulShine75
    In regard to what another poster above me said about drying her clothes to get out wrinkes...because hey, let's face it...we're in nursing school, who has time to iron???? Anyway, as I was saying...I always throw a damp washcloth in the dryer to get out those....I've been in the laundry basket, waiting to be folded for a week type wrinkles.

    I think they were pretty darn harsh on you to threaten to kick you out! Seriously. I could understand if this was a major problem that they have been on to you about before, but for the first time....not very professional.

    Regardless I wouldn't show up wrinkled anymore.
    Good luck!
  4. by   SoulShine75
    These are really great tips...thanks for the info. I didn't think about not washing my scrubs with my other clothes. I usually don't, but not because I thought about that but because they're all white and I didn't want any color to run on them. I definately won't now.
  5. by   Nurset1981
    I went to an old school LPN program, where you wore whites, and I mean white, below knee skirts, pressed shirts the whole nine..put it this way I had to wear the dixie cup thing on my head when I graduated. I found it easier to be meticulous about my uniform to avoid getting a new one ripped by my instructors which = being sent home to change which =loosing clinical hours that you have to make up. In short, iron your clothes. =)
  6. by   NaomieRN
    Quote from SoulShine75
    In regard to what another poster above me said about drying her clothes to get out wrinkes...because hey, let's face it...we're in nursing school, who has time to iron???? Anyway, as I was saying...I always throw a damp washcloth in the dryer to get out those....I've been in the laundry basket, waiting to be folded for a week type wrinkles.

    I think they were pretty darn harsh on you to threaten to kick you out! Seriously. I could understand if this was a major problem that they have been on to you about before, but for the first time....not very professional.

    Regardless I wouldn't show up wrinkled anymore.
    Good luck!
    I am in nursing and I do have time to iron. I iron my work clothes everyday. You are in a professional field and you have to look professional. There is no excuse for not ironing clothes. It takes less than 10 minutes. I rather spend the 10 minutes ironing than spending it in the instructor's office.

    I plan to wash my uniform every night after clinical by hand and let them airdry with a hanger. That way, I dont have to do too much ironing. It will take me 5 minutes to iron. I can understand not having time to cook, but ironing, come on now.
  7. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from FutureNurse35
    I plan to wash my uniform every night after clinical by hand and let them airdry with a hanger. That way, I dont have to do too much ironing. It will take me 5 minutes to iron. I can understand not having time to cook, but ironing, come on now.
    Let me know how the handwashing thing works out for ya...I had to schedule time to pee while in nursing school...busy busy busy.

    I had 10 minutes to iron but preferred not to. If she doesn't like it, take the uniforms,etc to the dry cleaners. Its worth spending the extra bucks vs. getting kicked out!
    Last edit by nurse4theplanet on Sep 25, '06
  8. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Uniforms taken to a cleaners is $$$ and can take a day or three to get back.
  9. by   AggieNurse99
    I'd iron. We judge and are judged in every encounter with people on appearances. If I see a man in a nicely tailored armani suit, I think of him one way. If I see the same man in a muscle tank and ratty gym shorts, I think of him another. There's something to be said for a great tailor ($45 to alter 2 pants, 2 tops, and lab coat for clinicals) because your clothes look like they were made for you. Appearances are the 1st impression -- make it count.

    Tip - stain removal from whites - automatic dishwasher detergent. Fill the sink with warm water, mix detergent in, let garment soak 2 hours or so....or can use as a spotter. I find that 1/4 cup white vinegar in the rinse keeps static and lint away, but overuse can damage fibers. I'm kind of a modern hippie. Borax, vinegar, lemon juice, washing soda, baking soda, ammonia; you can clean just about anything.
  10. by   TinyNurse
    do whatever you have to to graduate.......conform to whatever they tell you to. Then after graduation, you can do whatever you want (or what your facility tells you to)!!
  11. by   Kiren
    If you have time to read and post on this board, you have time to iron your uniform. If you are reading this post and show up to clinicals with a "wrinkly" uniform, let's face it you are lazy!!!! We tend to find time to do the things we want to do. When I say "wrinkly" I don't mean the wrinkles from your car ride to the facility. It's pretty easy to tell wrinkles form sitting and wrinkles from not ironing your uniform. I look at nursing school like being in the military whatever the instructor says goes, like it or not.
  12. by   RebeccaJeanRN
    You know...the more i think about it...usually if its said more than once and by more than one person, it really must be noticeable. Also, I'd wonder about maybe whether it was even more than just wrinkles, like maybe I gave off a 'sloppy' general appearance. With sincerity in your demeanor, I'd pull one of those instructors aside when I came in MINUS the wrinkles and ask them 1) if the improvement in your clothes now met the school's standard and 2) if there is anything else in your appearance that they recommend or think needs to be changed. (Be careful to be sincere and not sarcastic!) Nows the time to get the kind of honest feedback that most people will NOT give when you are out working (like telling that other guy that he has BO...pew!), and which also may keep you from not getting a job someday and not knowing why. Your instructors will be impressed.
  13. by   Natkat
    I'm looking at this philosophically.

    Some of didn't grow up learning how to be presentable. My parents were redneck hillbillies and I've had to learn things like cleanliness, punctuality and grammar from other people. Anytime someone comes up with a rule regarding appearance or etiquette I figure they're doing me a favor. In one of my first office jobs I was reprimanded for my appearance. I was so mortified but had no idea what I was supposed to do. It wasn't until I got a job with a dress code that I finally understood the concept of "business dress."

    So even if YOU think it's okay to be rumpled and casual, other people may not think so, and unfortunately people will judge you by your appearance. Whether or not it's fair is another matter. If you show up for duty sparkling clean, odor free, on time or slightly early with your clothes sharply pressed people will perceive you as being more competent.

    For the poster who says she prefers body odor over the smell of deoderant, I tend to agree with you. However, most people do NOT agree with that so you should defer to what the people around you prefer. When I'm home I don't wear deodorant, but if I'm going to be anywhere around people I make sure I do.

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