Share your SHORT-CUT writing skills - page 2

We all got a lots of notes to write, what kind of short cuts do you use. For me, I use the folowing: w/o=without c=with bcuz=because & = and... Read More

  1. by   prmenrs
    Speedwriting--I took a class on this once, and I still use some of the abbreviations on occasion.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speedwriting

    nl=normal

    abnl=abnormal

    Leave out some vowels (leave in long ones, unless it's a word you use a lot); develope symbols for common suffixes: -ion is one.

    You always seem to have one prof that is a speed reader, and/or there's just a LOT of material. Shortcuts definitely make life easier. Just don't forget what your shortcuts are!!
    Last edit by prmenrs on Oct 10, '07
  2. by   SA2BDOCTOR
    That is a neat posting. Thanks

    Quote from prmenrs
    Speedwriting--I took a class on this once, and I still use some of the abbreviations on occasion.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speedwriting

    nl=normal

    abnl=abnormal

    Leave out some vowels (leave in long ones, unless it's a word you use a lot); develope symbols for common suffixes: -ion is one.

    You always seem to have one prof that is a speed reader, and/or there's just a LOT of material. Shortcuts definitely make life easier. Just don't forget what your shortcuts are!!
  3. by   WDWpixieRN
    I have been using BG this week for blood glucose as we are studying diabetes...

    One I picked up in A&P II was:
    m for muscle
    mm for muscles

    Otherwise, I use of what's listed above!! Great post!!
  4. by   Pat_Pat RN
    Dz for "disease"
    I type most of my "stuff" for class, even for my own use, I can do it almost as fast as I can write (print acutally, I can't read my own writing)
    I try to use medical abreviations as much as possible, but with the JCHAO (or whatever it is) rules, you can't use some of those in the hospitals anyway...

    Pat
  5. by   prmenrs
    pnm=pneumonia
    pntx=pneumothorax
    abx=antibiotics
    lg=lung

    A straight line after a word (sort of attached) means "-ment"

    Capital S= "st" @ beginning or end of the word

    n v d = nausea, vomitting, diarrhea

    abd=abdomen

    Capital D = "day"
    Last edit by prmenrs on Oct 11, '07
  6. by   mcknis
    a/w A with a checkmark after for accuchek
    sx PITA (figure out yourself)
    h/o [] -concentration
    hx cx - culture
    dx gtt - drop/drip
    fx LOL -little old lady
    tx LOM - little old man
    abx * - need to know (or...one arse to risk - as I have seen it before)
    mm (mucous membranes)
    a - before
    p - after

    I would like the schools to provide us students with a class on how to read the Dr's abbreviations. Sometimes they come up with the wierdest abbreviations for orders. I think it should be available to take a speedwriting course at the local CC, but it isn't where I go to school.
  7. by   DaFreak71
    For notes in school (read-->not while charting), here are a few I use:

    BS = bullsh*t
    *** (use your imagination)
    WC=who cares?
    BFD= big F'ing deal
    PI = pure insanity
    ?= ask about this later/get clarification
    Happy face = cool things/good outcomes
    Sad face = bad things (pt can die from XX)
    Pg. 315 = read more on that page
    RUK= are you kidding me?
    NOT = not on test
    T! = test question

    :spin:

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