Please help...I'm so confused

  1. So I got accepted into Samuel Merritt's Entry Level Master's Program in FNP. I already have a bachelor's but want to change careers. My confusion lies in the fact that it will cost me $80,000+ just to get my RN. Should I just go to a Junior College and get my ADN? My ultimate plan is to become a CRNA. An RN is an RN right?

    I'm supposed to start Samuel Merritt in two months. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    amanda
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  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   LeavingTeaching4RN
    An RN is an RN right?

    I sure hope so. I have a BS and have chosen to get my ASN then do a RN-BSN program as well because it is more cost efficient.

    My undergrad degree gpa is only a 3.3, which isn't high enough to get into the accelerated programs at the public schools in my area. I got into Barry University's ABSN Program but the tuition there is over $12,000 per semester.

    I couldn't sleep if I paid this much.
  4. by   TexasPediRN
    Quote from aniahz
    So I got accepted into Samuel Merritt's Entry Level Master's Program in FNP. I already have a bachelor's but want to change careers. My confusion lies in the fact that it will cost me $80,000+ just to get my RN. Should I just go to a Junior College and get my ADN? My ultimate plan is to become a CRNA. An RN is an RN right?

    I'm supposed to start Samuel Merritt in two months. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    amanda
    You can go for your ADN, but you will need to go back for your BSN before you can get your CRNA. The Masters program in FNP(that you mentioned above) will not give you your CRNA, so I'm slightly confused as to why you are going to that program instead of getting your BSN and then going for your CRNA...

    Curious though, do you qualify for any financial aide? My BSN cost 100k - I barely paid 30k with all the scholarships and financial aide I received...
  5. by   LeavingTeaching4RN
    Quote from MeghanRN
    You can go for your ADN, but you will need to go back for your BSN before you can get your CRNA. The Masters program in FNP(that you mentioned above) will not give you your CRNA, so I'm slightly confused as to why you are going to that program instead of getting your BSN and then going for your CRNA...

    Curious though, do you qualify for any financial aide? My BSN cost 100k - I barely paid 30k with all the scholarships and financial aide I received...

    If you already have a BS, you don't qualify for any grants. You may not qualify for stafford loans either if you've exceeded your limit during your first degree. I'm attending a CC, whose school limit is much lower than the fed's limit. So, I won't be able to get fed loans and they probably won't certify any private loans either. So, I've made other plans to pay.
  6. by   vh1817
    Yes, financially it's smarter to get your ADN first-- then you can get your BSN after one additional year. In most facilities the pay for nurses is not any different for an ADN than for a BSN/MSN in the same position.
  7. by   TexasPediRN
    Quote from LeavingTeaching4RN
    If you already have a BS, you don't qualify for any grants. You may not qualify for stafford loans either if you've exceeded your limit during your first degree. I'm attending a CC, whose school limit is much lower than the fed's limit. So, I won't be able to get fed loans and they probably won't certify any private loans either. So, I've made other plans to pay.
    Ah, point well taken
  8. by   MB37
    Yeah, why are you going to an FNP program if you want to become a CRNA? Most CRNA programs require a BSN, but there are some that will accept students with an ADN and a BS/BA in something else. The cheapest route is usually ADN followed by BSN while working, but it takes longer - which gets expensive if you don't work during school. I'm in an 18 month ABSN program, which means all I have to do is graduate, work in an ICU for a year or two, and I'm ready to apply. My entire program, including books, supplies, and tuition, will cost about $12,000. I'll graduate December of 08, which is a year earlier than I would if I had chosen the local ADN program. I can also focus on learning to be a nurse when I graduate, instead of having to start taking classes towards a BSN. It depends what the different costs are of various levels of colleges in your area, how much time it will take, and how much time you have to devote with school - while people do it, ABSN programs get a lot tougher if you also work and have children. See what programs - ADN, BSN, ABSN, and bridge programs - are in your area, compare the costs of each, and compare the amount of time you'll spend in school and/or waiting for acceptance to each. Then figure out which will best fit your plans and your schedule. Good luck!
  9. by   suespets
    what ia a/an asn, absn,/cc, ccrn?
  10. by   crisbiss
    Hi,
    My understanding of the entry level fnp program at SM is that the $80,000+ is actually for the full 3 years. You will get your RN as well as a masters....meaning the RN alone is not costing that full amount.
    They do have an accelerated second bachelors program at SM for those people who just want a bachelors, have you looked into that?
    The problem you will face with going to any local community colleges here in the bay area is that they admit students based on a lottery. I have been applying for years to all of them with no luck.....i finally realized that it doesn't make sense for me to continue to wait to get in while working a low-ish paying job. I need to get in and am willing to pay to get there. Particularly if you have good grades or work experience ( things that CC's dont look at) trying for a private school may be your best option.......if it has the program you want.

    Good luck!
  11. by   beth66335
    Quote from suespets
    what ia a/an asn, absn,/cc, ccrn?
    ASN= Applied Science Nursing
    ABSN= Applied Bachelors of Science Nursing
    CC= Community College
    CCRN= Community College Registered Nurse
    or did you mean CRNA= Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist
  12. by   futurecnm
    Quote from aniahz
    So I got accepted into Samuel Merritt's Entry Level Master's Program in FNP. I already have a bachelor's but want to change careers. My confusion lies in the fact that it will cost me $80,000+ just to get my RN. Should I just go to a Junior College and get my ADN? My ultimate plan is to become a CRNA. An RN is an RN right?

    I'm supposed to start Samuel Merritt in two months. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    amanda
    So you are going to have masters then get another masters as a CRNA? It seems like you are getting one too many masters for where you want to end up? Maybe I'm confused...
    I have a previous bachelor's as well and am doing the community college AD route. i will later get my bachelors and NP in time, with help from my employer hopefully! I could never pay that much for the RN, that is just me. Others will feel differently. But I had to be practical. I have a husband and kids and I am not able to pay back loans for college (when I already have one degree!) I am happy enough to get my AD, the RN license and work from there based on my financial situation. I know in May when I graduate I will be able to find a job and I can go to school in the future. $80,000 is a lot of money. I looked into an accelerated program around here and it was $25,000 so that threw that idea out the window for me. I want to be a nurse but not for that price!!!!
  13. by   Freedom42
    Why should the poster go for an ADN when she already has a bachelor's degree and will need a BSN to become a CRNA?

    I have a bachelor's degree and am pursuing a BSN. I will actually earn the BSN in 15 months, less time than it would have taken me to earn an ADN. Since it's at a public university, the total tuition -- including prerequisites -- will work out to less than $20,000.

    I realize that RN = RN, but it doesn't make sense for someone who has a BSN to go back for an ADN and foreclose future employment and education options (presuming the price is relatively the same).
  14. by   justme1972
    A friend of mine in my nursing school was accepted to a nursing school in the next state (we are close by) b/c she was so far down on the alternate list. It was a BSN program

    If she had attended the BSN program with out-of-state tuition, the cost of her BSN would have been over $55K, in loans.

    She called me b/c on the 3rd day of class, she was accepted into my ADN program, which she said she could easily cover with a little help from her parents and her part-time job. She will graduate debt-free and have the hospital pay for her BSN through tuition reimbursement.

    You just have to weigh your options and find out how to cut the best deal.

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