Plan B for if you Fail/Get Kicked out of Nursing School? I may need help with this.

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    I am curious to hear from those who have considered this or who maybe approached many options; what do my prerequisites to get into the Nursing School allow me to go for if Nursing turns out to not be for me? I have heard of Health Information Management but what other options exist, if any? I wouldn't even know how to look, to be honest. Similar questions have been asked but those were specific to Pre Nursing. While the options maybe the same, perhaps there is something that would be a good fit to segway into after getting in. Thanks in advance for responses.

    Backstory/Venting (Feel Free to Skip)

    I find myself having to ask this now as I am not sure I am cut out to be a nurse. I am struggling with tests, but I can study more and master those, easily. I am confident in my next exam and expect a high B if not a low A. My issues have been with Clinical work (eg the most important part of Nursing School).

    I love filling out the paperwork. I love the Nursing Care plans and even aced my first Nursing Care Plan, my only issue being my rationales didn't cite page numbers, only the book sources (others in my Clinical group had trouble staying focused on one Nurse Diagnosis whereas I had no trouble with that). Sadly, paired with my knack for memorizing medical jargon well enough to sound smarter than I am, that is where my talents in Nursing tend to dry up. I approach patients with an earnest wish to help but tend to look at them as a sack of fascinating components rather than people. I felt this was justified since Maslow's Heirarchy makes it clear that Physical well being is more important than Psycho-Social well being but my instructor has made it clear that unless I manage to become more human with my patients, I won't be getting through Nursing School.

    One I was asked to get a full set of Vital Signs for complained that she hadn't been comfortable with me taking her apical pulse or checking under the blanket for sores and ulcers but that she felt intimidated into letting me. This is true and I do own up to it; I had run into problems with her allowing me to take vital signs and being, generally, very difficult. I approached it in kindness, initially, but when it became clear that my grade for clinicals was going to be jeopardized when she stone walled I relied on my old bouncer/security guard mainstay (eg nothing too big, or so I though; stepping just in inch closer than is comfortable, maintaining unnerving, unbroken eye contact, speaking in a curt yet persistent way, etc - I am not proud of it, but I am a big, uncharismatic, scary guy and this has always been my means of garnering compliance from others when avoiding/quelling/convincing them wasn't an option). I feel like much of this comes down to inherent brain function and personality stuff; things you can't just study for.

    I don't like how this makes me feel. I don't like that I am viewing my clinical patients as obstacles to my success rather than sick human beings that need my help, more and more. I am sticking with it but if this doesn't click and I find that I can't deal with this, I would like a Plan B to opt into instead.
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  3. 36 Comments so far...

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    Wow......I am sorry you are having difficulties.

    I mean this is the best way but you may not like what I have to say. I am seldom at a loss for words but.....I find I am not sure how to respond to your thoughts.

    You do realize that your bouncer approach in nursing is considered assault.

    Patients have every legal, and human, right to refuse ANYTHING they choose when hospitalized. Even if it interferes with your idea of what they need or what you want.....unless, of course, they are a danger to themselves and others. Determining if they are a danger to themselves or others involves a physician to determine this and sign LEGAL documents.

    Maybe this patient felt afraid of you and found your behavior, and aggressive behavior, assaultive......grounds for police charges, dismissal from school and any job you may have in nursing. It can make you ineligible top sit for boards or when you have one...your license revoked for assault and unprofessional conduct.

    Big, uncharismatic, scary guys can be gentle, thoughtful and kind.....I've seen it.

    Your behavior is a problem. You don't have to be warm and fuzzy but your delivery needs to be less....aggressive, assaultive.

    Your clinical patients are human beings....with people who love them. They are sick, frightened and vulnerable. They are not objects in your way or success. Would you find your behavior appropriate if someone treated someone you love was treated in this manner? and if they did...would this make you upset if someone did this to someone you loved and needed to protect.

    While changing your approach is something you can't "study for" it is something that can be learned......if you really want to. I think you need to seriously consider whether or not this profession is for you. Have you thought of counseling to deal with your feelings of aggression? To learn how to deal with these......impulses?

    Maslows hierarchy of needs means to treat a patient as a whole and that one need needs to be satisfied before the next for the patient to be "whole", to be fulfilled as a human being with needs. NOT that you treat one aspect and toss the rest aside because it suits you. This is one of the few times I will say...maybe you are right.....maybe this profession isn't for you.

    What do your pre-requisites qualify you for.....non medical. I am not sure.....nursing is pretty specific. I think you need to think about what suits your personality. Maybe Health information might be the best option for you. How about forensic science....forensic pathology?

    I think you need to look deep in your heart and find what suits you....or find a way to change...to learn how to deal with people in a non aggressive manner. find out what makes you tick.

    I truly wish you they very best.....((HUGS))
    ShaeMarie, Surprised1, pinkiepieRN, and 4 others like this.
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    as a pretty big guy myself, i would recommend just naturally talking to the client. a friendly face, smile, pleasant conversation can work wonders. tell people what you're doing before doing it. if they refuse, move on. as a first year nursing student myself, i can appreciate the difficulty you face but you have to be engaging with these folks. ask them about their lives, where they're from, anything impartial or neutral but above all, be friendly and smile. a couple times in clinical, the client did not want me to be in the room or provide a shower (both times it was an elderly woman and it was just a case of modesty) so you move on and don't take it personally. i know what i signed up for and i know not everyone is comfortable with a male nurse and that's okay! there's always something else to do! next semester is my OB rotation and i fully expect much of the same but again, that's alright! for every person that doesn't want their vitals taken, there is someone else who you can work with. don't give up and and try to see what other people see. best of luck to you!
    SHGR, BrandonLPN, grad2012RN, and 1 other like this.
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    As long as you realize that your behavior about acting like a bouncer is wrong, you can change it. I am the same type of student as you; loved the paper work, but had trouble in clinicals. I hated clinicals actually, everyone else around me loved them. I stuck it out until the end, and in my preceptorship I fell in love with nursing and felt it all come together with patient interaction and all. Just know that some people do not like nursing at first, but can grow into it and still be amazing nurses.
    JustMe54, Everline, and Esme12 like this.
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    I was never a bouncer but I am a pretty big it as well from sports and the military so I know what you mean by unintentionally using your size in situations.

    Just stick with it, nursing qualifies for pretty much nothing else because it is so specialized of a degree even the pre reqs don't count for any other school.

    That being said sometimes talking to patients sucks, especially if you are not used to working with random people on a daily basis. Like you I excelled with the medical/technical part of nursing but with the touchy/feely part I was just maybe average. You'll get better in time don't worry.

    Find your niche
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    You can work on trying to build rapport with patients, but what you described sounds somewhat "interesting" and not in a good way. I would be very uncomfortable with that approach, and I think others would be as well. You will spend a lot of time interacting with patients as a nurse and you will need to be someone they can trust. It you can't access your humane side when dealing with patients, you should just change majors now. What you described sounds manipulative and I'm sorry, just plain weird.
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    Quote from minniebrown
    You can work on trying to build rapport with patients, but what you described sounds somewhat "interesting" and not in a good way. I would be very uncomfortable with that approach, and I think others would be as well. You will spend a lot of time interacting with patients as a nurse and you will need to be someone they can trust. It you can't access your humane side when dealing with patients, you should just change majors now. What you described sounds manipulative and I'm sorry, just plain weird.
    How is he being weird? He has a recognized a problem and is coming here for help on fixing it.

    If you think nursing is all hugs and rainbows when dealing with patients you are wrong.
    Last edit by Esme12 on Oct 11, '13 : Reason: TOS
    ChristineN, pinkiepieRN, grad2012RN, and 1 other like this.
  10. 0
    Quote from Dranger
    How is he being weird? He has a recognized a problem and is coming here for help on fixing it.

    If you think nursing is all hugs and rainbows when dealing with patients you are wrong.

    I don't think it's all going to be hugs and rainbows, but the focus is on the patient. If someone feels uncomfortable with your behavior, you solve the problem in the best interests of the patient. You don't assert your will over someone. That makes ME feel uncomfortable and to ME it seems weird. I have learned in life to trust my gut and it seems off to me. Sorry if you took that as me being judgmental.
    Last edit by Esme12 on Oct 11, '13 : Reason: edited quote
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    Quote from Dranger
    How is he being weird? He has a recognized a problem and is coming here for help on fixing it.

    If you think nursing is all hugs and rainbows when dealing with patients you are wrong.
    Strong-arming patients is NOT an acceptable practice in nursing. Patients have rights including not having a nurse (or nursing student) that they are uncomfortable with attending them.
    Last edit by Esme12 on Oct 11, '13 : Reason: TOS
    Meriwhen and Madras like this.
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    MODERATOR NOTE:

    I have edited several posts.....personal attacks will not be tolerated.
    Our first priority is to the members that have come here because of the flame-free atmosphere we provide. There is a zero-tolerance policy here against personal attacks. We will not tolerate anyone insulting other's opinion nor name calling.
    Our call is to be supportive, not divisive.
    The OP has come here for genuine advice...and they deserve it.

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