Pathophysiology

  1. Can anyone share any tips on how to successfully pass pathophysiology. The information in the textbook is overwhelming. If anyone can suggest an effective way to study and pass this class. I would greatly appreciate it.
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  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   decartes
    Read the chapters to be discussed before lecture, pay attention in class, take great notes that you understand and ask questions prn.
  4. by   firstyearstudent
    I always use index cards to make a nightmarishly high stack of flash cards for any concept or idea or fact that I think I either don't already know or am likely to forget quickly. I make them during reading the textbook and lecture notes. The act of writing them is helpful. Then I methodically go over the flash cards, removing the cards from the pile as I feel confident I have memorized them. It's completely obsessive but it's worked so far (in the short term, anyway, my memory usually fades not long after the exam, uhhh). I also gain a feeling of accomplishment as my pile shrinks, which keeps me motivated.

    Then I prepare for finals by bringing back cards for review to see if I still remember them...

    This may be inefficient. It uses so much paper, and my classmates sometime snicker (good naturedly) -- but I'm doing well and folks in the class often ask me to bring cards to study sessions or ask me to quiz them before tests.

    I use this method for pretty much any class or teacher that involves a lot of memorization. Some classes/instructors focus more on critical thinking. I use cards far less for these.
    Last edit by firstyearstudent on Aug 17, '06
  5. by   Daytonite
    the trick of pathophysiology is to first know the normal physiology. only then can you appreciate what is going on when things get screwed up. when you fully understand the normal physiology, it is much easier to see how a monkey wrench thrown in the works messes up the physiological process. depending on where the monkey wrench lands in the physiological cycle determines what disease and symptoms you get left with. this approach is very important to understanding pathophysiology. outside of that, even i have read, re-read, re-read, re-read paragraphs in my pathophysiology book to grasp major concepts at times--and i am just reviewing information. some of this stuff gets very complex. i have the pathophysiology text by mccance and heuther that is quite huge. not too long ago i was answering a question for a student about the differences between anemias and why some cells were smaller than others yet both were anemic. i had to re-read the information in one or two paragraphs in the textbook over and over quite a number of times before i finally was able to understand what was going on at the dna level.

    you may not have to read your entire textbook with such scrutiny. i would use your syllabus and lectures as a guide as to what the instructor considers to be the most important subjects to be covered for tests and then really delve into and attempt to understand those subject areas.

    for diseases, diagnosis and treatment i often go to the website family practice notebook at http://www.fpnotebook.com/index.htm . this is for clinical medicine. in a very nice outline form, and links to other pages of outlines, it gives you the down and dirty on the major medical diseases. the fastest way to find a disease is to use the search box on the home page and click on the return(s) that come up.
  6. by   NaomieRN
    How about asking the instructor what do expect on the exams. I usually ask the instructor weeks before the first exam. Some instructors go strickly by the book, while others want you to focus on classnotes. Most professors are a combinations of the two. If your instructor exams base on classnotes, tape the lectures. If it is a combination, tape and read before and after lectures. Good luck to you.
  7. by   Dabuggy
    Hello,

    My patho class starts on the 28th. I have my patho book and ordered a book from half.com called patho made easy. When I get it I will let you know. May be your library has this book. I also do the read, re-read and taped notes. Hopefully this other book will have some tips to remembering.

    Dabuggy
  8. by   SA2BDOCTOR
    Quote from Dabuggy
    Hello,

    My patho class starts on the 28th. I have my patho book and ordered a book from half.com called patho made easy. When I get it I will let you know. May be your library has this book. I also do the read, re-read and taped notes. Hopefully this other book will have some tips to remembering.

    Dabuggy
    I look forward to hearing you reponse on this this textbook
  9. by   SA2BDOCTOR
    Quote from daytonite
    the trick of pathophysiology is to first know the normal physiology. only then can you appreciate what is going on when things get screwed up. when you fully understand the normal physiology, it is much easier to see how a monkey wrench thrown in the works messes up the physiological process. depending on where the monkey wrench lands in the physiological cycle determines what disease and symptoms you get left with. this approach is very important to understanding pathophysiology. outside of that, even i have read, re-read, re-read, re-read paragraphs in my pathophysiology book to grasp major concepts at times--and i am just reviewing information. some of this stuff gets very complex. i have the pathophysiology text by mccance and heuther that is quite huge. not too long ago i was answering a question for a student about the differences between anemias and why some cells were smaller than others yet both were anemic. i had to re-read the information in one or two paragraphs in the textbook over and over quite a number of times before i finally was able to understand what was going on at the dna level.

    you may not have to read your entire textbook with such scrutiny. i would use your syllabus and lectures as a guide as to what the instructor considers to be the most important subjects to be covered for tests and then really delve into and attempt to understand those subject areas.

    for diseases, diagnosis and treatment i often go to the website family practice notebook at http://www.fpnotebook.com/index.htm . this is for clinical medicine. in a very nice outline form, and links to other pages of outlines, it gives you the down and dirty on the major medical diseases. the fastest way to find a disease is to use the search box on the home page and click on the return(s) that come up.

    i have checked this website out and it is really informative. thank you
  10. by   Imafloat
    I made charts of things and highlighted the differences. As an example, there are 4 types of allergic reactions so I made a 4 section chart with each type of allergic reaction at the top of each column, the patho, clinical manifestations, treatment, and complications of each going down the side. I used a highlighter to highlight the differences because we were usually tested on the differences. I took patho 2 years ago so I am a little rusty.
  11. by   Josh L.Ac.
    If you are taking the summer pathophysiology / web-enhanced version at research, I could sale you my notes!

    J/K. One of the instructors did offer to buy them from me though.

    The patho class at Research is a different animal if you take the "on-ground" semester-length version or the "web-enhanced" eight-week version - each one has its own strategies.
  12. by   SA2BDOCTOR
    Quote from Josh L.Ac.
    If you are taking the summer pathophysiology / web-enhanced version at research, I could sale you my notes!

    J/K. One of the instructors did offer to buy them from me though.

    The patho class at Research is a different animal if you take the "on-ground" semester-length version or the "web-enhanced" eight-week version - each one has its own strategies.

    Yes I am scheduled to take the web-enhanced version of the pathophsiology next summer at Research. I SO NEED THE LECTURES LIKE YESTERDAY umpiron: Let me know....... I even got the text book and I started reading it but it is so overwhelming and I do not know what to focus on.
  13. by   br107
    Quote from Dabuggy
    Hello,

    My patho class starts on the 28th. I have my patho book and ordered a book from half.com called patho made easy. When I get it I will let you know. May be your library has this book. I also do the read, re-read and taped notes. Hopefully this other book will have some tips to remembering.

    Dabuggy
    if its the book from lippincott, i have it. its pretty good because the writing, pictures, and stuff make it really easy to understand. typical chapter starts off basic phsysiology of that body system then it gives info about disease that affect that system, including why it happens, symptoms, related test results, etc.

    i'm taking patho this semester too and already have my textbook. the lippincott book looks like it will come in handy if i get bogged down by too many details in the text.
  14. by   Dabuggy
    Thank you. I have to pay more attention to the fine print. I ordered my book online and thought shipping only took 3-5 days. Nope, thats when they get their stuff together, then it goes into snail mail with 4-10 day delivery.

    Thanks for letting me know what is in it. I also have a pocket patho book and I used it for clinicals. It was good because it took out all the filler and just had the meat. I have that option also.

    Good luck with your class

    Dabuggy

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