Nursing School Recruiting/Advertising -LONG

  1. I was wondering if the following has happened at any of your schools. Our local Newspaper recently did a huge piece on the Nursing Program at the closest CC to me. It was all about the great shortage of Nurses - said the CC was going to local middle and high schools talking about Nursing Careers and trying to recruit students for their Program. They even set up some sort of "Nursing Program" for teenage kids at one of the local hospitals so they can be exposed to life in the Hospital. That's wonderful - but they have nothing like that for adults trying to get into their Program.

    I was really confused about their "supposed" shortage of Nursing Students - because when I checked into their Program last Summer they were incredibly "discouraging", mentioned that they usually have 500 applicants per year (that's hardly a shortage) and refused to discuss any particulars about the Program until you attended one of their Orientations. I found another CC a little further away - much more encouraging about the chances of getting into their Program - very, very helpful Nursing Director and a great variety in ages applying.

    Today I was getting blood work done (part of the Nursing School physical) - last part of the admission process - yippee. The Lab Tech saw that it was a Nursing School physical - asked what school I applied to and said she was also trying to get into Nursing School (at the first school I mentioned). She said she was so disgusted with the way they treated "older applicants" - said they seemed more focused on finding kids right out of high school and didn't try to hide that fact. She said she has a BS in Laboratory Science and besides my Docs. Office, she works weekends doing lab work at Duke University Hospital. She has an incredible educational background, loads of experience, seems like any Nursing Program would love to have her - but she said this particular CC wasn't taking any of her background into consideration - what a shame that is. She said she loves working in the Lab - but like most of us - feels drawn to Nursing and is trying to pursue this and has very little hope of being accepted into this schools Fall Program. I suggested an accelerated Program - she said with her family, job, etc. she was hoping to go to this local CC and not travel a long way to school.

    I just can't figure out what's up with this School. Why they would have an article in the paper about a shortage of Nursing Students when there are literally hundreds of us very qualified "older students" trying to get in??? Sorry for the length - just wondering if this is happening at other schools. Thanks...
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   VickyRN
    Before they can fix the "shortage of nurses" they had better fix the shortage of nursing faculty. In NC, the General Assembly could help by pumping some more desperately-needed $$$$ into the cc system. The big fat University system gets all the steak and gravy, while the cc system gets a bone or two, and maybe a few crumbs. :angryfire
  4. by   RNSuzq1
    Quote from VickyRN
    Before they can fix the "shortage of nurses" they had better fix the shortage of nursing faculty. In NC, the General Assembly could help by pumping some more desperately-needed $$$$ into the cc system. The big fat University system gets all the steak and gravy, while the cc system gets a bone or two, and maybe a few crumbs. :angryfire
    Hi Vicky,

    I'm assuming you're a Nursing Instructor - are you in NC - and if you are - can I ask at what School? I spoke to an ER Nurse at a local hospital last week - she went to UNC for her BSN. Said from day one at School the Instructors were trying to talk them into at least considering becoming "Instructors" some time during their Nursing Career because there was such a dire need for them. I asked her if she planned on doing that - she's not - her goal is to become a FNP, as are many of her former classmates.

    It's obvious that the lack of Instructors is one of the reasons so few applicants are accepted into Programs each year (which makes total sense). Have to have enough teachers to train all those students. I have no idea what kind of salary a Nursing Instructor makes - but obviously it's not enough or there would be tons of Nurses heading that way.

    I've heard some of our Rep's are trying to get more funding for the local CC's - let's just hope they can pull it off.
  5. by   TopCat1234
    Quote from susannc
    it's obvious that the lack of instructors is one of the reasons so few applicants are accepted into programs each year (which makes total sense). have to have enough teachers to train all those students. i have no idea what kind of salary a nursing instructor makes - but obviously it's not enough or there would be tons of nurses heading that way.
    from what i've read that is one of the main reasons nursing schools can only accept such a limited number - no faculty. and yes, nursing instructors can make more in clinical practice than in teaching. i guess some instructors feel the aggravation of teaching is not worth it? i don't know but my ultimate goal is to become a nursing educator. i feel that is where i can make a difference in nursing. jmho.

    topcat
  6. by   Sheri257
    Just FYI, it's not only a problem with instructors. The schools have to convince hospitals to take more students for clinicals.

    Not any easy task by any means.

    :spin:
  7. by   epg_pei
    Quote from SusanNC
    .... just wondering if this is happening at other schools. Thanks...
    It does. We have the university sending out those recruiters to high schools to get kids interested in nursing careers. What they should do is send out some of the nursing grads who can't find decent jobs around here and have to leave. Makes ya wonder eh? I have become quite cynical. I see degrees as products. Like buying a used car, more or less.
  8. by   orrnlori
    I would assume that the CC that is looking for all the young students has some sort of internal policy push going on. Maybe it's that the young students don't come with the baggage of the older students who have spouses and kids and daycare and all the issues that come with us older folks that may cause some problems with the program. There could be all sorts of reasons they have decided to push for only this type of student. Since it's only this one school, it has to be something internal this school is thinking. Schools are just like businesses, they get bad ideas every once in a while and try to push them until they discover it's not working.


    I too would like to some day be a nurse educator, am working towards a master's. I haven't got a clue right now how to break into the college system to teach. Seems like a locked down system where I am, you have to know someone to get in.

    Since I love to stir the pot, I think I would write a letter to your paper and ask your question. Maybe they will print it and force the school to reply publicly about their obvious mis-statement of facts.
  9. by   CarVsTree
    Quote from orrnlori
    I would assume that the CC that is looking for all the young students has some sort of internal policy push going on. Maybe it's that the young students don't come with the baggage of the older students who have spouses and kids and daycare and all the issues that come with us older folks that may cause some problems with the program. There could be all sorts of reasons they have decided to push for only this type of student. Since it's only this one school, it has to be something internal this school is thinking. Schools are just like businesses, they get bad ideas every once in a while and try to push them until they discover it's not working.
    That is called age discrimination and it is illegal. I see the older students in my class as well prepared for nursing school as the younger students. I don't see where an older students baggage is a liability for the program. Most older students also have valuable experience.

    OP, I would right a letter to the editor of the newspaper that did the article and state how the school appears to discriminate against adult learners. 500 applicants and they need to recruit? Seems like that money could be used to improve the program rather than recruiting "young" nurses.
  10. by   orrnlori
    Whoa! I wasn't saying that this was right, I was making an observation based on the original post about why this might be. That's why I recommended that she write a letter to see if she could get the school to come forth with some explanation for what they were doing. As I stated, it's a bad idea policy wise and yes, it is discriminatory and illegal. Some administrator has their head up their you know what.
  11. by   Iluvhospice
    In addition to a shortage of instructors, there is a shortage of available facilities where I live. We have to share with the local university, the community college LPN program and 3 ADN programs available within 50 miles. It's no wonder the nurses on the floor get so tired of having students around! And yes, the local high schools also have a program called Health Science, where they too come to the hospital for clinical experience and they leave with a CMA license (provided they pass the licensure test)
    So... there are a myriad of reasons why there's a nursing shortage. Thankfully, at 41 - 42 tomorrow! - I am not the oldest in my class. There's no age discrimination in my program... in fact, I think the youngest student is 25. We have a neat, diverse group of students. At present, I love nursing school - but I'm only in the 1st semester... ask me again sometime before I graduate December '05!
  12. by   RNSuzq1
    Quote from SarahRN2B
    Thankfully, at 41 - 42 tomorrow! - I am not the oldest in my class. There's no age discrimination in my program... in fact, I think the youngest student is 25. We have a neat, diverse group of students. At present, I love nursing school - but I'm only in the 1st semester... ask me again sometime before I graduate December '05!
    HAPPY BIRTHDAY - Sarah!!! :hatparty: Welcome to 42 (we're the same age)... Hope you have a Great One!!!! SusanNC

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