Nursing school isn't preparing me for the real world - page 3

I am in an accelerated master's degree program, only 1 semester in so far (never been a nurse, bachelor's outside of nursing). It definitely is a good program, and I am confident in the material I... Read More

  1. by   Lucydog14
    I have found that it's very frustrating to have someone in a CNL role with very little actual experience. It's hard to have someone telling you what to do when their inexperience is aging through.
  2. by   broughden
    Quote from Mavrick
    Accelerated degrees are the market answer to the astronomically high cost of an education. You may have bought the same degree but you did not get the same education. Let personal integrity guide you.
    I'm interested in how you arrived at that opinion.

    Accelerated programs are in response to many older, non traditional students with prior bachelor's entering the field.
    They get the same instructional hours and clinical hours as required, but go full time during the summer rather than getting summer semesters off like a traditional program.
    They are a blessing for nontraditional students for whom summers off add nothing other than a waste of time to pursuing their education.

    In fact I wish more BSN degree granting institutions would offer the accelerated track for older students with their AAs, who don't want summers off.
  3. by   stockmanjr
    Quote from broughden
    I'm interested in how you arrived at that opinion.

    Accelerated programs are in response to many older, non traditional students with prior bachelor's entering the field.
    They get the same instructional hours and clinical hours as required, but go full time during the summer rather than getting summer semesters off like a traditional program.
    They are a blessing for nontraditional students for whom summers off add nothing other than a waste of time to pursuing their education.

    In fact I wish more BSN degree granting institutions would offer the accelerated track for older students with their AAs, who don't want summers off.
    So summer externships or other healthcare experience is a waste? I think alot of folks are drinking the kool-aid of these programs.
  4. by   broughden
    Quote from stockmanjr
    So summer externships or other healthcare experience is a waste? I think alot of folks are drinking the kool-aid of these programs.
    A waste? No.
    Required for graduation from even a traditional BSN program or licensing? Also no.

    Kool aid? My local BSN programs are 5 semesters, period.
    Either traditional: 5 semesters (3 fall and 2 spring) for a total of 66 hours.
    Or accelerated: 5 semesters (2 summer, 2 fall and a spring) still the same 66 hours.
    Exact same academic training and standards.
  5. by   OcMurse93
    Quote from stockmanjr
    So summer externships or other healthcare experience is a waste? I think alot of folks are drinking the kool-aid of these programs.
    Assuming hospitals in your area even offer summer externships.
  6. by   andythenurse
    Great post! I think it's very common for nursing students to feel the same way. I'm graduating from a traditional BSN program, and I don't feel ready. Most programs are transitioning towards an educational model, and moving away from a "skills" model. It's a weird transition that not everyone agrees with. But basically the premise is that schools want to teach the skills, but focus more on the critical thinking aspects. A lot of that is done in classrooms. Schools are expecting new grads to get into a good residency program at a hospital to help cover the "skills" that haven't been emphasized as much.

    So yes, I think it's completely normal to feel that way.
  7. by   yesrun
    Quote from stockmanjr
    So summer externships or other healthcare experience is a waste? I think alot of folks are drinking the kool-aid of these programs.
    Thanks for all of the replies, everyone!

    I agree that while you may be able to get some more experience in an externship with a traditional BSN, the coursework and clinical time for accelerated programs is all the same. Sure, I may miss out on that externship/internship, but I wouldn't say that that makes accelerated programs inferior, as those externships are optional, as posted above.

    As far as the "kool-aid" goes...

    Traditional BSN at my state university IN-STATE TUITION + fees: ~$96,000, not including room, board, etc.
    Accelerated MSN, CNL IN-STATE TUITION + fees: ~$45,000
    Half the time, half the cost. They aren't robbing me by any means. Kool-aid? Why would I go through a full 4 year BSN program nearing 30 years old with a family to support when there is an option to get a BSN equivalent in half the time? The education remains the same, albeit faster. Those who can't learn at that pace are weeded out. That doesn't, however, change the fact that I feel that I won't be ready based on the education provided, regardless of the length of time it takes to provide.

    And, I am coming into this with over 5 years of EMS experience, which does count for something. I bet it's more valuable than a 3 month externship. Other people who career change bring their own individual experiences from their years in their previous career. I would argue that a 30 year old former engineer coming into nursing through an accelerated program would be just as, if not more qualified than a 21 year old traditional BSN student. Same knowledge/education in nursing, significant difference in life and work experience. Maturity in work and life goes a long, long way.
    Last edit by yesrun on Apr 11
  8. by   yesrun
    Quote from stockmanjr
    Is it just me or does it seem strange that someone with zero experience can get CNL certification?
    I do agree with this. I'll again point out that our instructors make it very clear that we will not be entering into the field of nursing with our first position being that of a CNL. We understand that a position such as that will come with at least a few years of experience.

    It's also worth noting that a CNL, from what I gather, isn't like a charge nurse or nurse manager. I don't see them in our area hospitals managing or bossing around other nurses. It's more of a QC/QI position at the systems level, rather than managing individual practice of RNs. Regardless, I remain believing that I will not fill that role for quite some time.

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