Nursing school: How did you make it? How many hours should you put in per week? - page 3

Hello! This is my first semester of A&P I. Last semester I was taking Micro and some of my classmates gave me some advice on A&P I. They said you should put in at least 10-20 hours of studying to get... Read More

  1. by   cherieanne5
    I think the true answer is depends on your learning and retention style. I spent time writing flashcards to go over anytime I had a free moment and I participated in as many study groups as I could. Our study groups would take a weekend away at the coast (an hour away) to study but also to get a breather. It was the best for us. I couldn't say how many hours/week I spent studying but I can say I worked full time nightshift, had 5 kids, and was able to pass with a 4.07 GPA. You will figure out what works the best for you:-) Hang in there, and congratulations on your career choice. There is no job more rewarding and worth the effort.
  2. by   Nimrodel
    The 10-20 hours for A&P varies from person to person. I spent 4 hours a week on it when I took the first part over the summer, and less than an hour a week for the second part. I'm not really spending any time on Micro this semester and got a solid A on the first test. That said, my experience is unusual as I understand it. Put in as much time as YOU need to get the grade you want, and don't feel like you have to study for a set number of hours if you already have something that works.

    And, most importantly, remember that it's not about how much raw time as you put into studying as what techniques you use to study. Some methods of studying (active studying) are a lot more effective than what we call passive studying. Active studying is making flash cards and concept map. Passive studying is reading the book over and over.
  3. by   ladylizort
    The school where I'm attending, they require us to make a "C" or better but more advisable to make an A on all classes as more chances to get in the program. I'm currently in my 2nd semester, and I have one more semester to finish my pre-requisite classes. Last semester, I took A&P 1, Psychology, and ENGL ( these are the classes that we are required to make a "C" or better, plus Math which is what I'm taking this semester along with A&P 2 ). I struggled with A&P 1 lecture. Just too much information. The school offered tutors, so I grabbed that opportunity. With 3 kids, it's hard for me to concentrate at home without locking myself in my room and study! The tutoring helped me a lot. I flanked on my 2 tests before I had a tutor. But, after that, I made all A's on the 4 remaining tests and had a final grade of A. I also realized that I can learn better when I'm interacting with someone. I don't have a tutor anymore because she's in the program and no more extra time to tutor But I learned from that technique she gave me. Repetitions, read your notes/powerpoints aloud and designate at least 2-3 hrs every day to study for each class. Group study helps too! Writing your notes repeatedly helps as well. Repetition is the key
    I will be taking my HESI A2 in the summer (June or July), and I Pray to God that I'll make it to 2018 Nursing Program. Best of luck to us! Just keep your focus. Also, take Multivitamins, Vit. C
  4. by   GrumpyOldBastard
    1. Every student has different strengths and weaknesses. Therefore, no single number of "X hours per week" will be accurate for all.

    2. If you are concerned about the demands of studying, I strongly suggest that the single most effective thing that you can do is work to improve your reading speed and effectiveness. Unless you are reading at >350 words per minute with >90% comprehension... there is room for improvement! MANY students are poor readers. Many students are great readers of novels... but poor readers of textbooks (textbooks require a different technique). I strongly suggest that you take the FREE reading evaluation at rocketreader.com. Trust me.... there is a large amount of reading in nursing school.

    3. The best way to deal with your fear of "harrassment" by faculty is to simply LISTEN, do what you are told, and do your best. Some faculty are toxic, but most of us want you to do well and work hard to help you be successful. However, at the end of the day....YOU have to perform to the standard.
  5. by   Guy in Babyland
    Quote from TheAtomicStig_702
    Not teach but to evaluate your learning? That sounds very sleazy and very lazy. So what is he? A teacher? Or a psychologist who evaluates you? I'm not asking for test questions or answers, but if I'm stuck on something in pharmacology, maybe they don't teach you how to do the math or they do and there's a few questions that are REALLY tough and I ask for help, I'd like the help.
    Instructors treat you like adults. They expect you to read the material prior to the lecture. The lecture will hit the highlights of the chapters that were assigned. Some nursing students have complained on this site that they had tests with questions that were not covered during lectures or powerpoints. That is because the instuctors expect you to read the chapters and ask for clarification during lecture. Tests cover certain chapters and along with information covered in lecture is fair game on a test. They will not ask you questions on obscure information in a chapter. Tests are intended to analyse you ability to understand the main concepts in the chapter. As nursing school progresses ther will be more and more on application of the information instead of the "The definition of XXX is XXX".
  6. by   Beldar_the_Cenobite
    Quote from Guy in Babyland
    Instructors treat you like adults. They expect you to read the material prior to the lecture. The lecture will hit the highlights of the chapters that were assigned. Some nursing students have complained on this site that they had tests with questions that were not covered during lectures or powerpoints. That is because the instuctors expect you to read the chapters and ask for clarification during lecture. Tests cover certain chapters and along with information covered in lecture is fair game on a test. They will not ask you questions on obscure information in a chapter. Tests are intended to analyse you ability to understand the main concepts in the chapter. As nursing school progresses ther will be more and more on application of the information instead of the "The definition of XXX is XXX".

    I'm willing to put the work and do whatever I have to if I can trust my instructor is willing to be approachable and work with me with things I don't understand and not kick back in their office during office hours and instead of answering my question I have, they say "easy money".
  7. by   shibaowner
    Most classes use powerpoint, but not all. At my nursing school, in some classes you were ok if you just studied the powerpoints, but in other classes you had to read the book in order to get an A or B. Just ask the professor - most will be quite up-front if you ask. You are going to have classes like Research in which there are no powerpoints - you will have to do a small amount of reading and then write and/or critique a paper.

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