Nursing school discouragement

  1. 0
    After struggling to get into nursing school (6 years, co-reqs plus pre-reqs while working) I finally succeeded! I started this fall and learned quickly how much more difficult it was than I could ever realize until I actually got it and started. I have been working/studying hard but unfortunately I messed up, at the much needed recheck on medications (3rd try) I failed. (combination nerves and for whatever reason completely forgetting to give my "patient" PO meds--I even prepped my drug cards and grabbed the darn cup for water!)

    This means I am out for the semester. I did the exit interview and withdrawal, all on the same day as failing, as well as doing the request to re-enroll next semester, Spring. My intructors told me that means I will graduate December instead of June 2014, so that isn't too terrible. My close friends and family are being amazing and really supportive. I am trying to figure out what to say, if anything to people at work. I am keeping my hours the same as is, planning on practicing checkoffs, finishing my huge drug list for next semester (will need it anyway!) and chugging along as I have always done. I am just stuck on what to say at work...suggestions? Thank y'all!
    Last edit by Joe V on Oct 15, '12
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  4. 15 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    Where do you work? Is it a health care related field? Why do you need to tell them anything about school?
  6. 0
    I think she's concerned about work friends asking how school is going.

    I'm sorry that you failed that test, but you seem to be on the right track to fixing it. Do you have to work? If you can financially make it, maybe you need to really cut way way back or quit totally. We barely made it, but we made it, I wouldn't h e done so well if I had worked, I know that for a fact!
  7. 9
    Good afternoon--

    I am sorry to hear that this situation happened to you. Nursing school is one of those unique phenomenons in life (like child birth or kidney stone) that no amount of verbal warning, reference reading, etc. can adequately prepare. Many of us have stumbled along on the path and many more of us will at some point.

    Try to look at this as an opportunity to re-organize, re-prioritize and form a proper battle strategy. It seems it has already brought to light a moment of self-reflection when you acknowledge that you have some anxiety.

    Know that you are now at an advantage when you resume your schooling as you have an idea of the challenges you face. Make the most of this insight--and it sounds like you have every intention of doing just that.

    So the advice is two fold:

    A) Whenever you perform validations, med passes, or any skill that causes your nerves to kick into hyper drive, I want you to use the most powerful tool in the nursing arsenal and give yourself permission to pause. It doesn't have to be long or dramatic, but sometimes you just need to take a moment, breathe, round up your scampering thoughts and get your head back in the game.

    My pause mechanism of choice? As I have mentioned in another thread, I am a hand washer. Whenever I need a moment, I sanitize or wash my hands. No one can fault me for doing it as we all know hand hygiene is critical and it affords me just a blessed second to clear my mind of mental clutter.

    Now don't get me wrong, there is a time and a place. When my patient is coding is not the appropriate moment to excuse myself to the sink for some soap and water therapy.

    But in validations and the world of nursing school it was my saving grace.

    Pause. Breathe. Proceed.

    In that order.

    2) What to tell your co-workers? Well you can go into the whole big long story (not recommended) or you can provide what I like to call a "non-answer". What is this non-answer? Politicians use it all the time. It is a group of words that equal nothing.

    Observe:

    How is nursing school going, you ask? I would say it's going just fine. Right now, I have taken advantage of an opportunity to take some time and reorganize my life some so I can focus a bit more on school. I'll graduate a little later, but ultimately it will be to my benefit.

    What did you just tell them?

    Nothing. Absolutely nothing. Just that you are graduating later.

    And frankly, you don't have to tell them anything out right. I would wait for them to ask. Why blab your business? Unless of course, it is something outlandish and amusing. In which case, as a people watcher and connoisseur of weird human behavior, I whole heartedly encourage you to proceed.

    May I suggest something along the following:

    Yesterday I tried to flush my pet octopus down the toilet while yelling "Release the Kraken!!" Now I have a rotting, dead octopus clogging my drain. Hey, has anyone seen my bandage scissors?

    Oh yes, something like that would do nicely.

    ~~CP~~

    Bad spelling is bad. I have no excuse. ::leers at raging, frothing laptop::
    Gold_SJ, KarmenB, EhKim86, and 6 others like this.
  8. 1
    I'm so sorry! I'm in now, and I can really sympathize! I am doing ok so far, but I have been a cna for years and I think my life experiences have helped too. Hang in there! There are a few in my class who aren't passing the pharm tests, and will probably have to retake the class. It's frustrating to say the least! I feel sick for you. I hope that things will be a bit easier for you next semester and you can graduate the same time we do! Ours is a 5 semester BSN. As for your co workers, if you care about them and you them, then tell the truth. The support is probably needed! If not, then just ignore them and go on with your life!
    KarmenB likes this.
  9. 1
    I am sorry to what happened to you, but I like your spirit. This is just a small setback. Everyone has their down time. I hope you will not be too discouraged. Just focus and soon you will reach your graduation. Sometimes mistakes can be lessons learned. Keep your head held high and just think positive. The future is still bright and rosy.
    KarmenB likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from allene24
    Where do you work? Is it a health care related field? Why do you need to tell them anything about school?
    Yes, I work at a hospital. I really do not have to say anything about school, I am just trying to come up with a plan of some kind because I know I will be asked how it is going.
  11. 0
    Quote from CheesePotato
    Good afternoon--

    I am sorry to hear that this situation happened to you. Nursing school is one of those unique phenomenons in life (like child birth or kidney stone) that no amount of verbal warning, reference reading, etc. can adequately prepare. Many of us have stumbled along on the path and many more of us will at some point.

    Try to look at this as an opportunity to re-organize, re-prioritize and form a proper battle strategy. It seems it has already brought to light a moment of self-reflection when you acknowledge that you have some anxiety.

    Know that you are now at an advantage when you resume your schooling as you have an idea of the challenges you face. Make the most of this insight--and it sounds like you have every intention of doing just that.

    So the advice is two fold:

    A) Whenever you perform validations, med passes, or any skill that causes your nerves to kick into hyper drive, I want you to use the most powerful tool in the nursing arsenal and give yourself permission to pause. It doesn't have to be long or dramatic, but sometimes you just need to take a moment, breathe, round up your scampering thoughts and get your head back in the game.

    My pause mechanism of choice? As I have mentioned in another thread, I am a hand washer. Whenever I need a moment, I sanitize or wash my hands. No one can fault me for doing it as we all know hand hygiene is critical and it affords me just a blessed second to clear my mind of mental clutter.

    Now don't get me wrong, there is a time and a place. When my patient is coding is not the appropriate moment to excuse myself to the sink for some soap and water therapy.

    But in validations and the world of nursing school it was my saving grace.

    Pause. Breathe. Proceed.

    In that order.

    2) What to tell your co-workers? Well you can go into the whole big long story (not recommended) or you can provide what I like to call a "non-answer". What is this non-answer? Politicians use it all the time. It is a group of words that equal nothing.

    Observe:

    How is nursing school going, you ask? I would say it's going just fine. Right now, I have taken advantage of an opportunity to take some time and reorganize my life some so I can focus a bit more on school. I'll graduate a little later, but ultimately it will be to my benefit.

    What did you just tell them?

    Nothing. Absolutely nothing. Just that you are graduating later.

    And frankly, you don't have to tell them anything out right. I would wait for them to ask. Why blab your business? Unless of course, it is something outlandish and amusing. In which case, as a people watcher and connoisseur of weird human behavior, I whole heartedly encourage you to proceed.

    May I suggest something along the following:

    Yesterday I tried to flush my pet octopus down the toilet while yelling "Release the Kraken!!" Now I have a rotting, dead octopus clogging my drain. Hey, has anyone seen my bandage scissors?

    Oh yes, something like that would do nicely.

    ~~CP~~

    Bad spelling is bad. I have no excuse. ::leers at raging, frothing laptop::
    Thank you C.P. I really like your encouragement! Definately keeping to look back at. I should be getting a copy of my Checkoff to see exactly what I did wrong so i can practice and not repeat mistakes.
  12. 1
    as someone who is currently repeating Med Surg III, I feel your pain. Telling my family and kids was the worst. Other people I just tell that I decided to postpone graduation until the next semester. People I know more closely I tell them I had difficulty juggling everthing (clinicals, class, motherhood, life in general) and am repeating a class to make sure I have learned and will retain the info. It is a minor set-back in the grand scheme of things. Good Luck to you.
    KarmenB likes this.
  13. 0
    Hello!

    You can just tell your coworkers that the workload is too much and that you will be starting again next semester. Maybe you can ask other nurses for advice on how to deal with nursing school, ect since you work at a hospital. Good luck


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