nurses at your hospital..have to vent-very long - page 2

Hey, needing to vent...I wish so bad that the nurses at clinicals would treat the student nurses at least like human beings. We are there to learn, and to a degree I think we help them out and save... Read More

  1. by   wonderbee
    With one semester down and 3 to go, I'm wondering if I'll be so lucky for the rest as I've been with this one. The nurses were great to us, or at least to me. At first I think they were basically just trying to ignore us until they got to know us and the weaker students were weeded out.

    Just like in the work place, I noticed that relationships between the nurses and the students were based on the individuals involved. Some students had strained relationships with the some of the nurses and others didn't. Another thing I noticed was that timing was very important. Knowing when to approach and when to get out of the way is a learned skill that I picked upon pretty quick. Now that we can do assessments, dressing changes, accuchecks, foleys and pass meds, the nurses are VERY happy to see pretty much the whole lot of us.
  2. by   RNPATL
    Quote from tsu_girl82
    Hey, needing to vent...I wish so bad that the nurses at clinicals would treat the student nurses at least like human beings. We are there to learn, and to a degree I think we help them out and save them time by doing "little stuff" they don't have time for. Last week a pt. kept asking for the nurse and was crying in pain, I went to the nurse to tell her what was going on and before I could say anything she said "I can't get a thing done with you student nurses talking to me and asking me questions all the time" I told her the problem anyway and she says, "next shift can deal with the pt" which was 30 minutes away. Her supervisor told her not ever to talk like that to us again, we were there to help--but out of 5 nurses only 1 is decent to us. Oh, the subject gets me so aggravated. I pray to God that when I am a nurse, I will take a second before I bite a studen't nurses head off and remember how tough things can get in school. PATIENCE is a virtue-just wish they knew that. We are supposed to take them cookies to clinical to thank them--and this will be sooo hard. I wish they could watch a tape of themselves and take a look at how they talk to us--nobody deserves to be so degraded! They should be ashamed!Sorry I have drug this on so long, I'm sure some of yall can relate. Thanks for the ear!
    I am sorry that you have had that kind of experience with a nurse. It is sad today that students are treated so poorly by nurses on the floor. We have student nurses on our unit everyday. As each class rotates on the floor, they have specific learning needs that must be addressed. The nursing instructor has always been very good letting us (the nurses) know what the students can and can not do, which helps us understand their learning level. As nurses on the floor, we have no tolerance for anyone treating our students poorly. However, with that being said, there are days when the unit is so busy and the primary nurses are so busy, that a needy student can drive us nuts. Not saying that you were needy, but the nurse you were going to should have at least looked in on the patient and provided the patient with some reassurance. Being in pain is not something I would want my patient to be in for any period of time. I don't know the whole story and I am not certain why that nurse would tell you that the next shift should deal with it. But suffice to say, we love our students and do our best to provide them with a great learning environment. Hopefully on our stressed out days, the students realize the pressure that is on the primary RN.

    Good luck and I hope things get better for your clinical group.
  3. by   orrnlori
    Sometimes when I have students in the OR and the case begins to go sour, I don't always have the time to work with the student. I do always try to let them know that things aren't too peachy right now and I'll try to get with them when it's feasable. Luckily, it doesn't happen much, but it does happen. I still always try to find the spare minute to talk to them and explain as best I can what's going on and why in terms they will understand.

    Not all nurses are bad to students. It will get better for you. Just hang in there and remember when you find yourself with a student in a few years how you feel right now. I've never forgotten what it's like to be a student and I don't think I ever will.
  4. by   z's playa
    Quote from tsu_girl82
    I think these are the best ideas I've heard from anyone ...he he he I'll let ya know how they like the cookies-hey, what's that i hear about putting visine in brownies goves you diarrhea? LOLThanks for listening and cheering me up
    Visine? Really? Sounds safe enough to do a test run on my brother. I'll let you know if it works.
  5. by   tsu_girl82
    just warning you z, he'll be sick for, like, 3 days...my sis did it to one of my old boyfriends she didn't like...he had diarrhea that would not stop! Your poor bro :chuckle
  6. by   Jen2
    I have encountered some nurses who acted like this and I don't understand it. Basically they are working short and have large patient loads. However, when I graduate from school I will be the newbie that works your night shifts, holidays, and weekends. So basically if you are mean to me as a student, I won't apply to work with you when I graduate.

    Let's not forget the CNA who failed out of the first semester of nursing school and now hates student nurses. I have also encountered several of these people. You can have a 500lb patient and they will be in the lounge watching TV when this patient needs to go on the bedside potty, however if they have a 90lb paitent that needs put on a bed pan they come running for a student.
  7. by   kahumai
    We had nurses like that at my clinical site and we, too had to bring them cookies.

    I just refused.
  8. by   z's playa
    Quote from BSNin05
    We had nurses like that at my clinical site and we, too had to bring them cookies.

    I just refused.
    I'm wondering why you and the other student had to bring them cookies?!? Why cookies and why HAD TO? I don't mean to sound rude but it sounds like grade school to me. They should just leave it up to the students. Wonder if the cookie thing is a tradition? If I'm really not happy with the teachers, I won't bring them any either. (well maybe anonomously lol)
  9. by   malenurse1
    Quote from z's playa
    I'm wondering why you and the other student had to bring them cookies?!? Why cookies and why HAD TO? I don't mean to sound rude but it sounds like grade school to me. They should just leave it up to the students. Wonder if the cookie thing is a tradition? If I'm really not happy with the teachers, I won't bring them any either. (well maybe anonomously lol)
    At the end of each of our clinical rotations we bring food for the nurses, aides and others who have been helpful to us by letting us take over their space. I am fortunate that our group has only run into one rotten nurse on the floor and we reported her to the charge nurse. He (yes he!) then reprimanded her and we did not she her for the rest of our rotation. Apparently she had a track record for being gruff to everyone,(so we weren't being singled out).
  10. by   malenurse1
    we did not SEE her. Sorry I can't spell unless it's in medical shorthand! lol
  11. by   Catma63
    Quote from tsu_girl82
    I think these are the best ideas I've heard from anyone ...he he he I'll let ya know how they like the cookies-hey, what's that i hear about putting visine in brownies goves you diarrhea? LOLThanks for listening and cheering me up

    I have never had difficulties with any nurses at the hospitals....Well, until yesterday evening when my group arrived to get our patient assignments. When we get our needed info to prepare for the following day's clinicals, they want us to get as much as we can..what meds the patient is on, the admitting diagnosis, labs.....and code status. Okay, my assigned patient happened to be in surgery and his chart was gone. All that remained was a one sheet summary outside his room in one of those (what ARE those things called? I forget). Anyhoo, I found his shift nurse and asked her if he was a code or a no code. She said, "I don't think we're supposed to tell y'all this information, are we? Aren't you supposed to find this out for yourself?" I explained to her that all of his records were gone and that I had gotten as much info as I could from that one sheet but the "code" area on that paper was empty of information. Now, I could have assumed that it meant he was a Full Code but I wanted to be sure so thus I asked and got this reply. She seemed to really be enjoying that I needed this info from her. When I told her I planned on working on that floor after I graduated she decided it was okay to tell me. So, did my sudden appearance as a prospective future co-worker have anything to do with it?

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