Now I know why nobody ever gets a 4.0 at my school ... - page 2

I was looking through a syllabus for one of my classes (worth 900 points total). This is the grading scale A = 899.07-900 points A- = 810-899.06 points B+ = 787.5-809.99 points B =... Read More

  1. Visit  springchick1 profile page
    0
    Quote from Live.&.Learn
    That's ridiculous, something should be done about that. As far as bonus points in nursing school, our instructors are allowed to give up to 12, (out of 504 points), and most of them use them all.
    Bonus points? That must be nice. Our instructors don't give any. No bonus points no extra credit assignments. You get what you get.
  2. Visit  FloridaDreamin profile page
    0
    I feel your pain, I had a 4.0 before my first semester.
    An A is 93-100
    B: 86-92
    C:80-85
    and anything below an 80 is failing. Plus you have to get 80% of possible exam points before anything else even factors in so it's tough, but I kind of understand why they do it that way. I think 5 people in my class walked out with straight A's the first semester. I ended up with straight B's, 3 of which were in the 90-92 range
  3. Visit  itsnowornever profile page
    0
    I had a 3.95 in nursing school until our last semester when they changed to the A+, A, a-, etc scale...knocked me down to a 3.85. I was furious. They retro activated the scale and most people went from B average to C average because of low Bs through the whole program.

    Posting from my phone, ease forgive my fat thumbs!
  4. Visit  SummitRN profile page
    0
    Quote from itsnowornever
    I had a 3.95 in nursing school until our last semester when they changed to the A+, A, a-, etc scale...knocked me down to a 3.85. I was furious. They retro activated the scale and most people went from B average to C average because of low Bs through the whole program.

    Posting from my phone, ease forgive my fat thumbs!
    That strikes me as completely unethical if not civilly actionable.
  5. Visit  stephanie. profile page
    0
    Quote from SummitRN

    That strikes me as completely unethical if not civilly actionable.
    Agreed.
  6. Visit  itsnowornever profile page
    0
    I was ****** but then realized, no one is really going to care about my GPA. I just felt BETRAYED. but got over it, graduated, passed NCLEX and got my ideal job. It was simply WRONG though. I know a few 4.0 people who were knocked down also :/

    Posting from my phone, ease forgive my fat thumbs!
  7. Visit  GrnTea profile page
    1
    Welllll, we can't give legal advice, but the word "Actionable" has a very specific meaning. You were Annoyed, you were Affronted, you were Angry, and you felt Abandoned, perhaps, but I strongly doubt that you really have any cause for prevailing in a legal action. Don't waste another minute worrying about this.
    psu_213 likes this.
  8. Visit  itsnowornever profile page
    1
    Quote from GrnTea
    Welllll, we can't give legal advice, but the word "Actionable" has a very specific meaning. You were Annoyed, you were Affronted, you were Angry, and you felt Abandoned, perhaps, but I strongly doubt that you really have any cause for prevailing in a legal action. Don't waste another minute worrying about this.
    I haven't! I got into grad school just fine, and I've moved on! Even if I did have cause, legal crap is just that- crappy!

    Posting from my phone, ease forgive my fat thumbs!
    psu_213 likes this.
  9. Visit  psu_213 profile page
    0
    Quote from itsnowornever
    I had a 3.95 in nursing school until our last semester when they changed to the A+, A, a-, etc scale...knocked me down to a 3.85. I was furious. They retro activated the scale and most people went from B average to C average because of low Bs through the whole program.

    Posting from my phone, ease forgive my fat thumbs!
    Out of curiosity, did this change cause anyone to be dismissed from the program? Where I went to school, you did not have the "luxury" of getting a C in a nursing course...get a C, you were gone.

    PS, I agree that this was 'crappy,' but I cannot see how this is actionable. Why is the first instinct for some to contact an attorney?
  10. Visit  psu_213 profile page
    1
    Quote from GrnTea
    How many errors in pharmacology do you want your mother's nurse to make? Of course it's hard.
    I certainly agree it should be hard; however, I think this grading scale is a bit ridiculous.

    Do you want you mother's nurse to make an error in basic nursing practice? Of course not. At that same time, you are not going to demand every GN to get a 100% on the NCLEX to pass.
    SopranoKris likes this.
  11. Visit  itsnowornever profile page
    1
    Quote from psu_213

    Out of curiosity, did this change cause anyone to be dismissed from the program? Where I went to school, you did not have the "luxury" of getting a C in a nursing course...get a C, you were gone.

    PS, I agree that this was 'crappy,' but I cannot see how this is actionable. Why is the first instinct for some to contact an attorney?
    No. If you we're a C- student they didn't change your GPA. UGH. that's what got a lot of us mad. And just to be clear- I wasn't the one to mention a law suit. Another poster said I should have talked to a lawyer. Why? LMAO. I already paid for school, I'm not paying for a lawyer. LOL

    Posting from my phone, ease forgive my fat thumbs!
    psu_213 likes this.
  12. Visit  SummitRN profile page
    0
    Quote from psu_213
    PS, I agree that this was 'crappy,' but I cannot see how this is actionable. Why is the first instinct for some to contact an attorney?
    Why is the first instinct of some in nursing to simply accept being screwed over and then ask for more? It's a MAJOR problem in our profession and it starts in nursing school. If protest to the school is ignored, should one curl up and accept injustice?

    I do understand not wanting to waste effort. Itsnowornever got her job and into grad school, but others might not have.

    If someone's GPA change caused them to lose scholarships, grants, no longer qualify for grad school, or be less competitive for grad school and grad school scholarships... or certain employers that offer increased pay if GPA is above a cutoff (VA does this)????

    I am no lawyer, but that ex post facto GPA change could certainly mean financial losses and lost opportunity for some students, possibly easily demonstrated... I bet a lawyer would take that case. That the school stopped short of using the policy change to fail out students who were borderline passing shows that they had some fear of legal consequences.
    Last edit by SummitRN on May 10, '13
  13. Visit  psu_213 profile page
    0
    Quote from SummitRN
    Why is the first instinct of some in nursing to simply accept being screwed over and then ask for more? It's a MAJOR problem in our profession and it starts in nursing school. If protest to the school is ignored, should one curl up and accept injustice?

    I do understand not wanting to waste effort. Itsnowornever got her job and into grad school, but others might not have.

    If someone's GPA change caused them to lose scholarships, grants, no longer qualify for grad school, or be less competitive for grad school and grad school scholarships... or certain employers that offer increased pay if GPA is above a cutoff (VA does this)????

    I am no lawyer, but that ex post facto GPA change could certainly mean financial losses and lost opportunity for some students, possibly easily demonstrated... I bet a lawyer would take that case. That the school stopped short of using the policy change to fail out students who were borderline passing shows that they had some fear of legal consequences.
    And I am not a lawyer, but I am pretty sure the school can set up whatever grading scale they want. When I was in nursing school, there were two "sections" of microbiology (i.e., the "same" course taught be different instructors, each with their own exams and their own grading scales). My instructor led a very traditional course with lectures and 3 exams plus a final. The other instructor gave a ton of bonus points and decided there would be no exams--students would be graded on group presentations that they had to give. Basically everyone in the latter class got an A. My class had a more traditional grade distribution. By your logic, someone who failed in "my" class should sue the school since they clearly got hosed.

    I know of another course where too many people were failing, so they changed the grading scale to make it more "friendly." This school has a reputation for producing quality graduates. Now word gets out that they altered their grading scale so more people pass and more get As--and employers and grad schools lose faith. The student who earned an A all along now gets "screwed" (to use your word) since now 30 more people have unearned (based on the original scale) As. If that influences his/her chances of getting into grad school, should they not sue?

    BTW--this is not about nurses "simply accepting" anything...and the students did not get screwed. I agree, its crappy and would be upset if my grade got lowered. However, the school is well within their rights to establish a grading scale and modify it as they see fit.

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