Needlestick yesterday, should I report it? - page 2

Long story short I poke myself on the inner part of insulin pen needle, these are safety needles so after injecting the patient the safety guard should have gone up and my thumb shouldn't have been... Read More

  1. by   direw0lf
    I was still blinking my eyes over how she repeated the dose of insulin.."the dose likely leaked out of the skin" Likely? And you repeated the full dose? Without telling a nurse or your instructor?

    ETA
    Just read the rest of the comments.
    That is some questionable policy imo when a student says she's not sure if insulin went in but most "likely" leaked out.
  2. by   I like cats
    I Saw the insulin leak out, and no there is no way to verify how much the patient got and how much she didn't, but again I did as per policy by regiving the insulin and after consulting the charge nurse as well.

    The 'likely' is that the insulin likely leaked out of the patient's skin because I must not have pressed hard enough with the pen to inject the needle deep enough into the patient. Also why I figure the safety on the needle did not automTically go up when I removed the needle from the patient, and thus how I got poked afterwards

    Didn't realize how some people feel the need to pick apart every single sentence...

    Yes it seems weird to regive the dose when no one can be certain exactly how much the patient got the first time, but that's the policy here, followed by more frequent gluc monitoring. I'm assuming that most people commenting are from the US.
    Whereas I am not
  3. by   Castiela
    I'm not American. You showed poor judgment not reporting a needlestick. We can't assume you didn't follow the same judgment with administering the second dose of insulin which is why you are getting comments about it.

    You made a mistake, and as a student, sometimes students (or full fledged nurses) aren't aware that they made a mistake which is pointed out. This forum is an educational support. We are making sure you are aware so you can grow as a nurse. I'm glad you followed up with the charge nurse and followed the hospital policy. I think at this point, we are just shaking out heads at the policy because it seems odd.

    Best of luck with your future studies and I'm glad everything worked out when you did report
  4. by   BadAszFannyPak
    I feel your pain. I would hate the ration of feces I would get from my instructors if that happened. However, your health and safety and your kid's is so much more important. I really do feel where you are coming from but next time, report it. It may suck and lead to bad stuff but hiding things in this business is always a bad idea. I'm sure you're fine though. Even if your pt was infected with some real nastyness, needle stick transmission rates are really low. Mucous membrane transmission rates however...
  5. by   BadAszFannyPak
    Yeah. It feels like my instructors and preceptors troll this site.
  6. by   wannabeny
    The poke on my thumb was superficial and no bleeding, patient is not known HIV or HEP Positive but no idea if she has ever actually been tested.

    i didn't report it yesterday while at clinical because I didn't think much of it
    You sound exceptionally blasé about a needlestick. You , showed blatant disregard for your own safety and more concern over assumed gossip and people's perception.

    Please learn from this. Not only for your own sake but your patients. We in the racing world have this saying about some horses...that they have "zero self preservation instinct". In other words, they'd rather near kill themselves and us than think things through that scare them.

    If you worry more about others perception rather than doing the right thing, what will you do the next time you make a mistake on yourself or your patient..?
  7. by   Ambersmom
    Quote from Castiela
    I'm kind of concerned that you double dosed a patient with insulin... You don't know how much insulin she had absorbed from your first dose. I would have waited an hour, checked her sugar, then, depending on of the patient was on a sliding scale or not, administered according to that or waited until her next dose
    Agree with you on that.
    Also concerned for OP's nursing conscience, seems to be more concerned with gossip than patient safety. Who cares if you get a needle stick?
  8. by   WereBadger
    Quote from wannabeny
    If you worry more about others perception rather than doing the right thing, what will you do the next time you make a mistake on yourself or your patient..?
    A thousand times this.
  9. by   CelticGoddess
    Quote from I like cats
    I Saw the insulin leak out, and no there is no way to verify how much the patient got and how much she didn't, but again I did as per policy by regiving the insulin and after consulting the charge nurse as well.

    The 'likely' is that the insulin likely leaked out of the patient's skin because I must not have pressed hard enough with the pen to inject the needle deep enough into the patient. Also why I figure the safety on the needle did not automTically go up when I removed the needle from the patient, and thus how I got poked afterwards
    I'm an insulin dependent diabetic and will have a small amount of insulin leak out sometimes. It happens. It's impossible to determine exactly how much, and it's dangerous to re-dose a diabetic. I don't care how often you check their fsbs. I've been given a small dose (6 units) and had my blood sugars drop to a dangerous low in less than 15minutes.

    I personally don't think this is a good policy.
  10. by   Froggybelly
    It's concerning that you are more worried about people gossiping than protecting your health by making the ethically sound, mature choice to speak with your instructor. I have seen countless residents and physicians stick themselves. They just roll their eyes and go handle it at employee health. It's a paperwork headache when it happens, but the important thing is to deal with it, even if it turns out to be nothing.

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