Jobs to help me get into nursing school?

  1. I decided 3/4 of the way through my junior year of college that I want to be a nurse, so I'm graduating first, then going back for a degree of some kind.

    In the meantime, I'm working ~20 hours a week at my University's billing office. Due to the nature of my position (I work 8-12:30, someone else works 12:30-5) I will not have to work 40 hours a week during the summer. What I would like to do with my newly found free time, since I'm not taking classes this summer, is to find a second part time job that might give me experiencing in a nursing-type field that might help me get into a nursing program in 2 years or so. Do programs even LOOK at experience prior to starting school? I had lunch with a good friend today who told me the school we attend looks heavily at prior experience in the admittance process. Is this normal?

    Does anyone have suggestions for a job for someone with no nursing-type training, but with good grades, speaks Spanish, and has lots of office/customer service skills that might be a boon when it comes time to showing nursing programs that I've been in "the field" already?

    Thanks for any advice!

    Meghan
    •  
  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   wonderbee
    Speaking for my school, in a word, no. Experience in the health care field is worth only 1 point toward at least 17 that generally gets you in and it doesn't even have to be giving direct patient care. Working in health care does not get you into nursing school. Grades and admission test scores get you into nursing school.
  4. by   AmyLiz
    Not at my school. Doesn't matter if you have healthcare experience or not. Not to say it isn't a good idea to get some experience, just for your own sake. I didn't have any until I got my job at the dialysis center & it's really helping me, I think. Being able to apply what I've learned in my pre-req's is a great feeling.
  5. by   Sheri257
    Interesting question. One of the CC programs in my area does require you to have a CNA certificate before you can apply. That's not a job per se, but since you can work as a CNA after you get the certificate it's almost the same thing. However, the five other nursing programs in the area don't require anything like that. The only other thing that's comparable is being an LVN, where you can save a year in my ADN program. But you have to take tests to do that, and about 50 percent fail those, at least at my school. And it's probably not worth going to LVN school for an extra year anyway.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Apr 5, '04
  6. by   TopCat1234
    no $$, but it might look good - volunteering in the community always looks good. one school that i'm applying to does look at community service and volunteer activities in your application.

    topcat
  7. by   meesa214
    Quote from lizz
    One of the CC programs in my area does require you to have a CNA certificate before you can apply.
    That's strange to me considering the first semester of the nursing program is Fundamentals (or whatever various schools call it) which is essentially the equivalent (plus some) of a CNA program. Why would the school want you to have to go through that twice?! Unless their first semester is not a "fundamentals" class.

    In answer to the OP, my school could care less if you had prior nursing experience. A previous bachelor's degree is a big plus, along with your grades on the program's prerequisites.

    Now, another school in my area DOES look at volunteer/community service, but that doesn't help if you're looking to make money
  8. by   Sheri257
    Quote from meesa214
    That's strange to me considering the first semester of the nursing program is Fundamentals (or whatever various schools call it) which is essentially the equivalent (plus some) of a CNA program. Why would the school want you to have to go through that twice?! Unless their first semester is not a "fundamentals" class.
    I see your point. I believe the reason is that they want to make sure you're comfortable with handling body fluids and such, since some people go through all the pre-reqs and then can't handle it once they actually get to nursing school. Even though it's not required at my school, and it is somewhat repetitive, some of the administrators do highly recommend the CNA course for that reason. Plus, it does make the first semester easier because you already know a lot of the basics.

    :spin:
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Apr 6, '04
  9. by   belladelicious
    At my school, they don't look at previous employment. But, if your friend goes to your school, she must know better than us, right? You could be a CNA on weekends. Maybe they'll look at that, and see that you're not one of those people who will drop out quickly, b/c you do have some experience. That would be the best thing. If you're not interested in that, I would just volunteer at the hospital once a week. If your school is very competitive and there's a long waiting list...maybe it'll help you. And of course, b/c you don't think you're start nursing school for another 2 years, it's especially important to have very good grades...I would focus on that the most.

close