IV rate formula's any easy ways to remember?

  1. 0
    Does anyone out there have any idea's on how to remember the IV rate formula's? Second semester starting on Monday, and these calculations will be our first test, I would like to find an easier way to remember them. Thanks.
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  5. 1
    Quote from critical thinker
    Does anyone out there have any idea's on how to remember the IV rate formula's? Second semester starting on Monday, and these calculations will be our first test, I would like to find an easier way to remember them. Thanks.
    volume to be infused (ml) x drip factor (gtt/ml) / time (min) = gtt/min
    is that the formula you are talking about?
    It is just a matter of getting the end units to what the question is asking for, there isn't much to memorize. It is all just manipulating numbers to get the right units. And making sure it all makes sense!
    rettax2 likes this.
  6. 0
    if you set these problems up using dimensional analysis there should be no problem. it's always the dose desired and then add the drop factor of the tubing or the flow rate to the equation to end up with the answer expressed as a ratio and its desired labels in the numerator and denominator positions.

    there are iv calculation problems and tutorials on post #6 of this thread:
  7. 0
    As a senior nursing student who has taken the dosage test 3 times at the beginning of each semester, I HIGHLY recommend using dimensional analysis. Formulas can get confusing but dimensional analysis works in all types of dosage problems. Good luck and don't stress.
  8. 0
    I always remember the ml/hr formula...which is just ML/total number of Hrs.....
    then drips per minute as total amount to be infused over time in mins and multiply the whole thing by the drip factor...
  9. 0
    I agree with Daytonite. If you learn the skill of dimensional analysis, you do not have to memorise any crazy formulas. You build the equation as you go. Once the equation is "built" you cross check to make sure all of your units cancel. If you end up with the units you are looking for (such as gtt/min) then you know you have built the equation correctly. Then...you are left with some simple multiplying and dividing. If you had your units correct in the set up...your pretty much assured to get the final correct answer.
    Approach pharmacology math as a skill...the only memorization you should do is your unit conversion fractions.


    akspudus
  10. 0
    Are you doing ml/hr or gtts per minute?? Volume over time=ml/hr and volume over time(make sure you convert hrs to minutes) times the drop facto= gtts per minute
    Last edit by mr.rn-2010 on Jan 12, '08


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