I got removed from my clinical practice - page 2

hi i got removed from my clinical practice i didn't think i could pass the clinical cause i had missed 24 hours of clinical time and would have to return to what i perceived a hostile... Read More

  1. Visit  BostonFNP profile page
    4
    It's hard to appreciate as a student but the two most important skills you can learn is talking to patients and doing a head-to-toe.
    LLDPaRN, KelRN215, GrnTea, and 1 other like this.
  2. Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights: Student Edition newsletter.

  3. Visit  Enthused RN profile page
    3
    ^ agree with BostonFNP. In my first semester, all we did was head-to-toes and talk to the patients. Since they were SNF residents, there was never anything exciting going on medically but it was still good practice for assessments. It's over 1 year later and I'm interning on a step down unit where I have learned head-to-toes and conversations are vital! Conversation/interpersonal skills are what you need to get the patient to allow you to touch them for an assessment and continue to cooperate. And obviously you need an assessment to do anything else for the rest of the shift.

    Also, I have been reading AN for over 4 years and I have heard this over and over again: you will eventually master the nursing tasks as a nurse; it is the critical thinking, assessments, and interpersonal skills that you should really nail down during your clinicals. So don't feel like you need to do every single nursing task known to man/woman. Nurses, correct me if I'm wrong on that but did you find that true?
    Last edit by Enthused RN on Feb 14, '13 : Reason: typos irritate me
    rumwynnieRN, loriangel14, and GrnTea like this.
  4. Visit  BSNbeDONE profile page
    4
    When my daughter was in LPN school, I was very supportive of her; giving her my very best professional answers to her questions. After all, with 27 years of nursing experience, she believed I knew a thing or two about nursing. Unbeknownst (sp?) to me, every answer that I gave her was used as ammonition to fuel debates with one or a FEW of her instructors. How did I find this out? I was nearing the end of my shift one morning when the students reported to the floor. One of the instructors told me that they were about to do something with a patient. Well, I disagreed with the instructor, politely of course, and gave an explanation as to why the task shouldn't be done. There was no argument, no audience, no debate....just a friendly exchange taking place in the best interest of the patient. No problem.......UNTIL.......I ran into my daughter before I got off and she introduced me to her instructor. That instructor gave me an earful about my daughter's defiance in class. She went on and on and on. When she was done lashing out at me in the hallway on the nursing unit, my response to her was, "#1: What does ANY of that have to do with me? #2: Aren't you suppose to be instructing your students here instead of trying to have a parent-teacher conference? #3: My daughter is an adult student in a nursing program that you teach....again, not my concern. #4: My shift is over; I'm going home to bed.

    Now, all that being said, when my daughter got out of clinicals, I let her have it!!!! I told her that if her instructor was teaching that 2+2=5 in HER class, that had better be her answer on the test! Under no circumstances do you debate publically with your instructor and there should be A LOT of thought in debating privately because then it is your word against your instructors. It is unfortunate that it's like that but it is a reality sometimes. She even went crashing through the Dean's door, demanding a meeting. OMG! Needless to say, by the end of the quarter, my daughter was out of the program. I was soooooo glad to hear that because, I know my child and right now, she doesn't have the restraint needed to be a nurse, especially in this day and age. And I am not ready to see her in court fighting for her license or livelihood. Maybe she will make a great nurse one day. But right now, it's not her time.
    nguyency77, loriangel14, GrnTea, and 1 other like this.
  5. Visit  cnmbfa profile page
    0
    Saying anything about clinical that identifies the site, your patient, or anything specific on socila media, especially if it is negative will not only get you in trouble with your program, but is likely to keep you form EVER being able to do clinical there again. And you can be certain that negative comments about faculty on FB will, if they come to light, keep you form being hired into many jobs. Why? Future employers will realize that if you did it to vent while in school, you are just as likely to smear them down the line.
  6. Visit  GrnTea profile page
    1
    Also, it's hard for schools to get hospitals to accept groups of students for clinicals. In cities where there are a lot of schools, the competition is fierce; some undergrad clinical groups are working night shift on weekends to get their hours in. You screw up like this, it reflects badly on your school and come contract time, they might just not invite the school back. Baaaad. This is so not all about you. Although most of it is.
    marycarney likes this.
  7. Visit  danny411 profile page
    0
    hi

    thanks, for all the great information. This is super helpful

    yep, working on stuff to do better.So i'm working with the counselor on perception, resentment, communication, sleep, diet, exercise,

    Also trying to volunteer now that i have more time.

    I find what you all wrote, super helpful. It really helps me understand the whole process.

    i was suppose to complete med surg then rotate over to forensics

    what will happen in psych nursing ?

    thnx so much for making everything super clear
  8. Visit  danny411 profile page
    0
    wasn't me who said i was brilliant.

    It was the head of the department

    i thought i did a horrible job in clinical.

    But they told me i was doing really good. patients liked me and my assessments were ok.
  9. Visit  Zombi RN profile page
    0
    Assessment skills are the cornerstone of nursing practice... I think that it's vital to understand just how important they are. Your other skills need to come second to excellent assessment skills. Accurate assessment is how we help save lives. Please, OP, don't think of it as "just" assessment or beneath other skills. It is so important!
  10. Visit  danny411 profile page
    0
    thanks,

    and i agree with what everyone has said so far

    I think everyone has offer really good insights to help me understand what was going on and what needs to be done

    Im trying hard to fix things and improve in all areas.

    iam going to counselling to resolve issues and professional issues, working out to burn off stress, volunteering soon, working in the skills lab one hour per week to improve, working on building better relationship with my peers at school and basically trying to be positive cause i think im so lucky to even still have a chance.

    thanks again dan


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

Top