How many schools did you apply to?

  1. Here's my dillema--I am applying to nursing schools for next fall. There is only one public BSN program in my area. There are private ones around, but they cost a lot, and since this is my second career, I'm paying and I don't want to come out of school with a huge loan.

    There are ADN programs around here, but I already have all the pre-reqs for the BSN. How many programs did you apply to and how many did you get into?

    Any input would be helpful, including any advice on assuring my acceptance into the school I want.

    THANKS!!
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   CEN35
    I applied for 5 and took the 1st one that had an opening!!!!!!

  4. by   BrandyBSN
    I only applied to one. I knew for years which one i wanted, and made SURE that I got in
  5. by   JennieBSN
    I applied to one. I was an undergrad at the university, though...that might have made a difference (they said it didn't...).

    Got into the one I applied to the first time around. My school had a reputation for being 'difficult' to get in to, and the professors were all so secretive about who got in why (some students with 4.0's were turned away while others with 2.9's got accepted...), so I just did the best I could grade wise, kept my nose clean discipline wise, sat in the front row at all my pre-req classes, and made sure not to get on the bad side of ANYBODY before I got in. That was about it.

    Just do your best. Keep your grades up. Don't brown-nose, but don't be a trouble maker (not yet...save that for AFTER you graduate...hee hee!). That's all you really CAN do, short of fulfilling any specific requirements they have outlined.
    Last edit by JennieBSN on Aug 26, '01
  6. by   BrandyBSN
    Consider moving out of KC?

    If you are, email me, My program is one of the highest ranked in the TriStates, and I would be very happy to help! Its a BSN program, and you start nursing as a freshman, not as a Junior, and we are not that far from KC, but too far to commute.

    Let me know!
    BrandyBSN
  7. by   kcsun3
    nurse s,

    I live in KC too and am in the same boat. I am finishing my prereqs and have applied to the public BSN program here for next fall. You're right - everything else around here is *very* pricey.

    I am nervous about pinning all my hopes on this one school, because if I don't get in, I'll have to wait another year. As I understand it, about 300 people apply there each year for 120 spots.

    On the other hand, I can't afford the private schools, even with grants and loans. I'm a single mom with 2 kids and a very limited budget.

    I wonder if there are any hospitals here that offer tuition assistance or student loan repayment programs? Have you heard of any?

    Steph T.
    The Student Nurse Forum
    http://kcsun3.tripod.com
  8. by   nurse s
    I am not sure of any tuition assistance, etc but I am looking into it. I was chatting with my mom (who gives the best advice) and she said "Your goal is to be a nurse, right?" "Then why not look into some community colleges, like JCCC, then do a bridge program later?" This sounds like good advice, because ADN and BSN get paid the same. I would like to go ahead and get my BSN, but if I don't get in and don't want to spend big bucks, maybe ADN is the way to go. At least that way I can start nursing ASAP.
  9. by   KristaB
    nurse s,

    That is also my thinking. I could have waited another year and gotten into the BSN program, but the way I'm doing it, I'll be an RN in 20 months and will be able to work while I do the BSN, and hopefully wherever I'm going to work will pay for my BSN bridge program.

    There is nothing wrong with getting your ADN first! We all take the same NCLEX. The main benefit (IMO) to getting your BSN is if you want to go after your masters or if you want to be in management. The pay difference between an ADN and BSN trained nurse is negligible, if any, if you're going to work as an RN.

    Krista
  10. by   BrandyBSN
    Right! There is nothing wrong with getting an ADN first and doing a bridge. Some hospitals do pay BSNs more, but its hardly ever more than a dollar an hour, 50 cents an hour here. Its a good idea to check on Hospital tuition reimbursment policies. You might be able to get the BSN for free taking that route.
  11. by   peaceful2100
    Oh about tuition assistance. I know children's mercy hospital offer assistance because I work there. They give you 3,000.00 a year if you are full-time and 1500.00 if you are part-time. It starts 90 days after employment. The health midwest system has a new loan program where it will pay part of new grads student loans I forgot how much total but I know it was pretty decent which was better than nothing at all.
  12. by   KC CHICK
    I have friends that work at Truman West. They fully reimburse for all classes taken through UMKC. Not bad, considering UMKC runs at least $160.00 per credit hour.
  13. by   Genista
    Nurse S-
    Hi! I applied to 6 schools. I was "ready" to transfer in the Spring semester, which narrowed my choices down to 3 out of 6 schools (some only accepted for Fall semester). Of the 3 schools, I was accepted to one, and placed on the wait list for the other (not accepted to the third).

    I went to orientation for the school I was accepted to, though it was NOT my first choice. I was bumped up on the wait list & accepted to school #2 (my first pick) during orientation at school #1. I terminated my application to school #1, and packed my bags! My philosophy is this: hope for the best, but play it safe. I would have taken any school I could get into (it was that competative), but still had my hopes pinned on one certain school. Lucky for me, my wish came true! I got into the school I wanted. I applied to state universities, so the tuition wasn't bad compared to private schools. Private school wasn't really an option for me, it was just too much money. Best of luck to you! Hope you find what you're looking for.

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