finished my 1st semester, not sure if I wanna go back

  1. Anyone else not sure if they want to back the 2nd semester?? I worked so hard for 4 months. No life.. just school and studying. My little girl (11 yrs) felt like she never spent time with me. And the stress... unbelievable stress (a lot of which the instructor brought about). Just don't know if I want to put myself thru that again. And they say the 2nd semester is harder and MORE time consuming.

    I'm ruining my break going back and forth trying to decide. I would hate to throw away the 4 months of hard work. People tell me just to hang in there...it will be worth it. Does everyone here think the same thing.. Will it be worth it?? What if I end up hating nursing and then it was for nothing.

    I want to be a nurse to help others...but I don't want to be a stressed out mess my whole life. I've been out of school for a week....and finally my stomach is getting back to normal and I'm feeling my old self again. Nursing Student Veronica isn't much fun.

    Thanks in advance for your input!

    V
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  2. 16 Comments

  3. by   DesertRain
    You know what, I'm sure that almost all of us have those thoughts at least once in their course of study. I have 2 little ones (4 and 8) and they always complain that I don't do things with them anymore. During finals I had to leave them at my mom's for a week and I felt so guilty about it but I didn't want to waste the time and effort put into it by ruining my studying by having them around. When I cheat from my study time, it is not to watch TV or go shopping, not even to go to the gym, I cheat my study time by playing with them which sometimes makes me feel like a terrible mommy. One thing that many people who have older children tell me all the time is that as much as it seems like they (my kids) need me now, it's nothing compared to how much they will need me when they are teenagers--emotionally, mentally and financially. Which is one thing that keeps me focused. If I finish soon, I will have all that to give to them when they need it most.
    Another thing that is wonderful about you being in school at this point in time, is that your daughter probably sees you as her idol and mentor and to see her mother so focused on something could inspire her to follow your determination. Like if she comes across something difficult in life, she will tackle it and not quit.
    I know you feel like quitting but you really really have to hang in there. I know that only a rare few enjoy how they feel during nursing school. Believe me, I know what you mean about starting to feel normal again. I just found my floor after months of letting laundry and dirt pile up on it. And I get really frustrated with mess, but it's one of the sacrifices that I had to make. I can totally relate with the stress. Towards finals week, I went in to the emergency clinic with serious stomach pain and found out that my stress & anxiety have taken a physical toll and I am now the proud owner of ulcers and gastritis--never had stomach problems before in my life! We will all make sacrifices, physical, emotional and mental sacrifices that will make the reward of finishing this so worthwhile.
    It won't be much longer where you will be putting on your scrubs and heading to work, working less days than you go to school, making good money and not having homework to do--which means more family time.
    Please don't give up now. Unless you have realized that the nursing field is not right for you, then stick it through and you will be so glad you did. Envision the future, stay focused and keep positive. You can and will make it through this.
    Last edit by DesertRain on Dec 21, '07
  4. by   GingerSue
    I agree - envision the future; you can get through this; yes, it is a lot of work with the studying because there is so much material to cover; try to plan for special time with your child and for yourself; make a list of pros and cons and all the best to you
  5. by   Jules A
    If you think you might not like nursing that is a whole different thing than not liking nursing school. The school stress will pass so if thats the only issue I would push forward because you have put in 4 months worth of hard work. For me while the work did get harder the stupid politics etc. are at least familiar and that lowers the stress level. If you are having second thoughts about actually being a nurse I would respect my heart and find another path. Best of luck to you.
  6. by   smileyhz
    I just finished my first semester of school as well. I never knew what an ulcer felt like until finals week last week when I had severe stomach pains. I know exactly how you feel. I have three children. Two girls ages 7 and 2 and a three-year-old boy. I am not looking forward to next semester when the work gets even harder and I have to leave my kids again for them to go to daycare for 6 hours a day/5 days a week. The only thing that is keeping me going is to picture myself graduating and being able to work as a nurse and then when my kids are teenagers I can be there for them when they need me the most.
  7. by   butrfli
    Quote from DesertRain
    You know what, I'm sure that almost all of us have those thoughts at least once in their course of study. I have 2 little ones (4 and 8) and they always complain that I don't do things with them anymore. During finals I had to leave them at my mom's for a week and I felt so guilty about it but I didn't want to waste the time and effort put into it by ruining my studying by having them around. When I cheat from my study time, it is not to watch TV or go shopping, not even to go to the gym, I cheat my study time by playing with them which sometimes makes me feel like a terrible mommy. One thing that many people who have older children tell me all the time is that as much as it seems like they (my kids) need me now, it's nothing compared to how much they will need me when they are teenagers--emotionally, mentally and financially. Which is one thing that keeps me focused. If I finish soon, I will have all that to give to them when they need it most.
    Another thing that is wonderful about you being in school at this point in time, is that your daughter probably sees you as her idol and mentor and to see her mother so focused on something could inspire her to follow your determination. Like if she comes across something difficult in life, she will tackle it and not quit.
    I know you feel like quitting but you really really have to hang in there. I know that only a rare few enjoy how they feel during nursing school. Believe me, I know what you mean about starting to feel normal again. I just found my floor after months of letting laundry and dirt pile up on it. And I get really frustrated with mess, but it's one of the sacrifices that I had to make. I can totally relate with the stress. Towards finals week, I went in to the emergency clinic with serious stomach pain and found out that my stress & anxiety have taken a physical toll and I am now the proud owner of ulcers and gastritis--never had stomach problems before in my life! We will all make sacrifices, physical, emotional and mental sacrifices that will make the reward of finishing this so worthwhile.
    It won't be much longer where you will be putting on your scrubs and heading to work, working less days than you go to school, making good money and not having homework to do--which means more family time.
    Please don't give up now. Unless you have realized that the nursing field is not right for you, then stick it through and you will be so glad you did. Envision the future, stay focused and keep positive. You can and will make it through this.
    Wow, DesertRain! You almost made me cry reading your post because of the financial stress I'm going through and I don't even start NS until Aug. Your words were powerful and very well stated. I'm printing out what you wrote, "We will all make sacrifices, physical, emotional and mental sacrifices that will make the reward of finishing this so worthwhile. It won't be much longer where you will be putting on your scrubs and heading to work, working less days than you go to school, making good money and not having homework to do--which means more family time," and will keep it near in times of encouragement! Thanks for helping me as well. That was sweet.

    And, Veronica, HANG IN THERE!!!! Yes, it's rough, tough and sometimes like military boot camp from what I've been told, but it will be a presitigous honor walking as a registered nurse to take care of patients who desire your personal tenderness, professionalism and TLC you bring to them in their time of need. Nothing will be mean more to you, but to see a smile on a patients face when they see you as their nurse that day! I CANNOT wait for that time to come!
    Last edit by butrfli on Dec 21, '07
  8. by   veronica123
    I guess I am starting to question whether I want to be a nurse....with lectures about lawsuits....MRSA....etc.

    Also, I felt like we were just thrown into clinicals. I felt very unprepared and I'm afraid it will be more of the same next semester. And if the stress of working as a nurse is the same as nursing school...not sure if I can live like that.

    I'm just so torn about what to do....I hate the feeling of indecision. I want to be one of these people who know fully that they want this....and will do whatever it takes.

    Thanks for your input and encouraging words.

    V
  9. by   HididiScribbler
    Veronica,
    I just graduated from nursing school and I was cleaning out all my old binders (I'm a little obsessive and kept all of them ) and I was looking through my first semester one going "Wow, that lecture topic was boring" and remembering how much I hated getting up to go to clinical in the morning.
    I personally really didn't like some of the first semester lectures, because the basics really aren't that fascinating...and clinicals are stressful because you're new to everything and you don't feel comfortable yet. But it DOES get better. It may not get easier, but you'll feel more comfortable in clinicals, you'll gradually accumulate more skills and confidence. You may not realize it's happening and you'll probably be stressed out for most of the time, but someday you're going to look back and think "Wow, look at what I can do now!"
    Does your program have a mentor? We have two, and they will help with test-taking, and clinical anxiety, and they're good people to talk to about concerns you have.
    I was SO nervous in first semester. I hated the thought of going to clinicals (I wasn't at a very good hospital), and I felt like I didn't know what I was doing. I would look at the nurses there and think that I could never do what they did. I really didn't want to start second semester, but I have to say, even though nursing school got harder, I felt better about it after 1st semester.
    I'd say, stick with it! You have one semester done, that's more than a lot of people. I know it's hard! But even though 2nd semester may be theoretically harder, you at least have a little better idea of what you're doing, and you get to do so much more than you can do in first semester.
    Good luck with whatever you decide!
  10. by   NaomieRN
    Success does not come easy. Nursing school is stressful and rewarding. Before you know it, you will be done. Just hang in there for a year and you can spend times with your daughter during break. You are not going to be in school forever. You can also use the opportunity to teach her discipline. While your daughter is doing her homework, you can study together.
    Last edit by NaomieRN on Dec 22, '07
  11. by   suanna
    I hate to be a downer but maybe you are right in thinking of not going back. Freshman and sophmore years were a piece of cake compaired to junior and senior classes. I missed a lot of time with my family that I'll never get back- they grow of so fast. Your daughter is at an age when she will require lots of support and supervision. I'm not saying nursing isn't for you but if you are having trouble finding time for yourself and your family at this stage, your daughter may as well be an orphan when you get to your later classes. If that is going to be too much for you it's better to waste 4mos now rather than 2 years later and discover you would rather spend your time being a mother. Keep in mind it dosn't get much better in practice- you will likely be working every other Christmas, Thanksgiving, Weekend. Nights is where most nurses start in acute care, and if you are new to nights it can be very disruptive to your family life. I don't want to discourage you from your chosen profession but don't feel like a failure if you decide your family comes first for now and school will have to wait till later. Raising a daughter is also a goal worth persuing.
  12. by   southernbelle08
    I don't have children, but I know I have had days like that. I remember ending 1st semester taking Zofran and Lomotil daily (I do have stomach problems, so nursing school has only made them worse) and wondering what on earth I was doing. I felt I was so stressed that I was crabby to my whole family and I also carry a lot of guilt where that is concerned. I am an only child, my Dad is in very poor health, my parents aren't in the best place financially...so I had every reason to quit and go get a job to take my financial burden off my parents.

    Then I took a step back and I saw how proud my parents are of me. Heck, they tell everyone they meet that I am in nursing school and sometimes it is nearly embarrassing how much they brag, but I know they are just SO proud of me. They don't see what I see about myself, just as I am sure your daughter doesn't see what you are seeing. I bet she is SO proud of you and tells people what you are doing just like my parents do. We're our own worst critics.

    I have plenty of moments where I know I love this - when a patient tells me how much I helped them, or their family tells me how much I did for them, or an instructor pulls me aside and tells me she is happy she gave me that patient because the moment I laid my hands on them, she knew I would take good care of him/her. All those things make it all worth it to me, and I pray you find those moments as you progress in school. Sure, we're all going to have crappy days...that is true for any job....but it is being able to find the blessings though it all and seeing if they outweigh the hard stuff.

    Nobody can tell you what to do, you have to look within yourself to find the answer. It wasn't hard for me to find it, so I'll pray the same for you. Good luck!
  13. by   caliotter3
    Recently another member posted about her decision to quit nursing school and a few weeks later, posted again her regrets. If you are going to quit, you should do so now, but insure that this is the right decision for you. My only input is that, job satisfaction aside, nursing offers an employment potential that not a lot of other jobs offer. You never know when you might end up in a situation where you absolutely need work and you will wish that you had that nursing license. I would encourage you to obtain the nursing license and keep it current for just that reason. There is no commandment written in stone that states you have to work as a nurse once you get the license. The nursing license is good job insurance. Nice to have as a backup, especially when you have a family that depends on you. Good luck with your decision. Just don't be hasty.
  14. by   DesertRain
    Quote from caliotter3
    Recently another member posted about her decision to quit nursing school and a few weeks later, posted again her regrets. If you are going to quit, you should do so now, but insure that this is the right decision for you. My only input is that, job satisfaction aside, nursing offers an employment potential that not a lot of other jobs offer. You never know when you might end up in a situation where you absolutely need work and you will wish that you had that nursing license. I would encourage you to obtain the nursing license and keep it current for just that reason. There is no commandment written in stone that states you have to work as a nurse once you get the license. The nursing license is good job insurance. Nice to have as a backup, especially when you have a family that depends on you. Good luck with your decision. Just don't be hasty.
    Yes, absolutely. And I wanted to add that when you are finished and working as a nurse, you will have a much broader financial capability for capita to start something different, perhaps to find what it is you really want to do. I have a friend who graduated as an LPN and very much disliked it. She disliked it through school, disliked working as an LPN during the first few months. But she saved her money and while she worked she went to fashion design school and now, her nursing days behind her, she has just launched her first line of clothing. We are all so proud of her, she is very happy with what she is doing--and the funny thing about it is, when I tell people she is actually a nurse, they say, "are you serious?" but she would never have had the funds to be where she is today had she just put it behind her and started from scratch. Another thing I wanted to point out, is in 2001 I graduated with a Computer Science in Networking Degree. Towards the end, I started realizing that it wasn't exactly what I wanted to do. I studied and passed my MCSE (kind of as serious as NCLEX but for Computer people) and never did anything with it but tag a short line about it in resume's and such. The thing is, I still keep my MCSE license card in my wallet, because heck, I am actually still quite proud of that even though nursing is far off. I am glad I didn't quit, even though it seems like it was a complete waste of time, in fact it is proof that I am able to accomplish difficult things. I really hope that you find the answers you are looking for this holiday season. I wish you the best.

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