Do you record lectures? - page 2

I am thinking about buying a digital voice recorder so I can record lectures and then transfer them to my computer. I'm looking at an Olympus DS 330, it has all the features that I would need. Has... Read More

  1. by   Toby's mum
    I recommend taping lectures (and sitting up front so you get the best recording). For my recent micro class, I recorded with the digital IC Recorder ICD-P28 by Sony. It records up to 9 hours. It has 5 folders so on Monday's class I would record lecture in Folder A, Tuesday in Folder B etc. Then I would relisten to the recorder while walking/exercising. Then I would upload the lectures onto the computer. The software to do this came with the digital recorder. Highly recommend it and certainly much better than the typical tape based recorder.
  2. by   Godswill
    My question is those that are using the digital recorder and uploading it on your computer, how do u type it. do u play it as u type?

    And as for the one where u can buy the software and talking to a microphone, where can i find this at?, i would really like to see how this work
  3. by   QuilterLPN
    Hey, thanks everybody. I will definitely try to do this this year. I am a front and center type of student, and I will be asking my instructors first if I can record, but I'm sure they will let me. I could even put my recorder up by the projector to record better. The recorder I'm looking at is digital, records up to 5 hours I think in LP mode, and comes with a USB cable and software. So that after you record your lecture, you take the unit home, and plug your recorder into your computer with the USB cable. Then using the software, you transfer the "file" to your computer. I'm guessing this is how it works. The one I'm looking at doesn't have the transcription software, to convert the voice file into written text, but I don't need that, and its alot more money.

    I'm looking at an Olympus DS 330, and they are going brand-new on e-bay for about $80. Less for a used one with all the goodies. I'm slightly worried that if I do this, I'll become everybody's resource for lecture information when they miss class because they are 'sick'. I know that these files can be written to CD or e-mailed, and that's pretty cool, but I don't want to do if for everybody.
  4. by   VickyRN
    Highly recommend tape recording my lectures to my students. And, just a simple "old-fashioned" tape recorder will do :chuckle You still will need to get permission from your instructor BEFORE taping. Most don't mind.
    When I was in ADN school, I tape recorded all of my lectures, then listened to them after class (with a set of head phones) when I was shopping, biking, etc. Wise use of scarce time resources--this was one way to study and do other needed things at the same time! BTW, the more senses you use in studying (visual, auditory, tactile) the more likely you will retain the information.
  5. by   NewEnglandRN
    My A&P professor let us put our recorders right on his lecturing desk. He would often have 20 recorders going on in front of him. :chuckle We also taped the labs, but that was less useful because there were "pauses" in the class. It made listening to the tapes a little boring.

    When I take notes in class, I try to write them out very carefully and transcribe them when I get home. If there is a place in my notes I don't understand, I "red flag" it and then listen to the recorder to complete my notes accurately.

    The great part about a digital recorder is that you don't have to flip the tapes over in the middle of the class. I bought a Sony ICD-P117 last year it is was worth it! I love that I can burn the lecture onto a CD and listen to it in the car.

    IMHO it's worth the investment if your teachers don't mind being taped.

    Michelle
    Last edit by NewEnglandRN on Jul 9, '04
  6. by   rnmi2004
    I tape lectures. I have a half-hour drive to and from school and I listen to it on the way. I have a high GPA and I know that the other students in my class with good grades also tape the lectures. Have you noticed that a lot of test questions come from lecture info? It might be a good idea, depending on how your instructor structures the class.
  7. by   Ari RN
    Yes. It's a good idea to get a tape recorder. Remember sometimes you brain wonders elsewhere.
  8. by   Wheaties
    is it better to record the lecture or take notes as the teacher lectures during the class?

    i dont record, but i assume its more time saving to take notes during lecture, even if it means not getting everything down.

    for those who record, do you feel that you are able to remember the information more 7 months later?
    Last edit by Wheaties on Jul 9, '04
  9. by   QuilterLPN
    Quote from Wheaties
    is it better to record the lecture or take notes as the teacher lectures during the class?

    i dont record, but i assume its more time saving to take notes during lecture, even if it means not getting everything down.

    for those who record, do you feel that you are able to remember the information more 7 months later?
    I definetely plan on doing BOTH! Because the tape may catch something I don't. And after studying for a while, sometimes I my eyes just get 'tired' - listening to tapes will help make better use of my study time, I hope.
  10. by   wonderbee
    I personally would be wary of the digital recorder for two reasons. First, will the transcription be true to the spoken word? The meaning of medical terms can easily be significantly altered with a spelling change or one missed syllable such as febrile and afebrile. Second, the learning comes with tactile use. The act of transcription is where many of us get the most benefit. Writing or typing reinforces listening and reading. It doesn't have to be word for word and not everything has to be transcribed. Remember, the machine can't do the learning for you.

    Everyone has a different learning style. Consider that an expensive digital recorder might not be the best learning solution for everyone.
    Kat

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