Continuing my education after my ADN Continuing my education after my ADN | allnurses

Continuing my education after my ADN

  1. 1 I am graduating with my ADN in a few weeks. I have always planned on getting my BSN but I have had a few teachers recommend that I go straight to a Masters. Due to minimal credit differences. I have never had an interest in getting my Masters because I do not have a desire to be a manager or to teach. Any advice since there is only a few credit differences between the two?
  2. 9 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  krisiepoo profile page
    4
    If it's not that big of a difference, I'd just get my masters and use it like you would a BSN but know that you have it and can do something else, maybe further down the line. Probably easier then realizing in 10 years you do want that masters and having to go back to school... just my 0.02
    llg, NutmeggeRN, SageFemmeReveur, and 1 other like this.
  4. Visit  AOx1 profile page
    2
    Op, I would agree with krisiepoo. I never wanted to teach. I discovered how much I love it by accident, when I was asked to teach ACLS many years ago. You never know what the future holds. If the credit hours and cost are similar, I would strongly consider it.
    Meriwhen and NutmeggeRN like this.
  5. Visit  SoniaReb profile page
    0
    Most RN to MSN program do require a intermediate BSN along the way. Some programs grant both a BSN and MSN at the end of the program. It depends on what area you plan to study for your MSN. For instance, most of the RN (ADN) to MSN programs do not allow you to become a Nurse Practitioner or Nurse Anesthetists.
  6. Visit  Everline profile page
    0
    My opinion is go for the MSN. I have a bachelor's degree in another field and am in an ADN program. I will mostly like start an MSN program after I graduate and work a bit. I don't have interest in getting another bachelor's degree, but will do it along the way if the program works that way. Look into different programs and see how it suits you. You may very well be happy down the road that you got your MSN.
  7. Visit  applesxoranges profile page
    0
    Well, it depends on what the MSN programs offer. I was thinking of doing Kaplan's RN to MSN program which isn't really that kind of program but I changed my mind due to the cost. I am going to do the University of Arlington's program or Ohio University and then do Kaplan's NP program.
  8. Visit  classicdame profile page
    4
    the older you get the harder it is to do those 12 hour shifts on a busy floor
    subee, houstonrnhopeful, BSNbeDONE, and 1 other like this.
  9. Visit  HouTx profile page
    0
    Keep in mind that there is a significant cost difference - graduate classes are much more expensive, even at state-funded schools. From a return-in-investment standpoint, a 'generic' graduate degree that is not associated with a clinical or functional specialty does not really add any value, career-wise.
  10. Visit  Stephalump profile page
    0
    Quote from bgilstrap
    I am graduating with my ADN in a few weeks. I have always planned on getting my BSN but I have had a few teachers recommend that I go straight to a Masters. Due to minimal credit differences. I have never had an interest in getting my Masters because I do not have a desire to be a manager or to teach. Any advice since there is only a few credit differences between the two?
    It would be all about cost for me. I wouldn't pay a lot more for a degree I have no intentions of using. I know you might want to advance/change your practice someday, but you can't choose a "maybe someday" speciality. If you choose something later, you may very well still have to go back to school and it'll cost even MORE.
  11. Visit  Lossea profile page
    0
    I agree in that it depends on how useful would the particular MSN be to you, for your career. I don't know how MSN programs are set up comparing to, say, Master's of Science, and the choices of projects you have to research...If you find a subject that is relevant to you, and agree with the costs (money, time and effort the program will require), I think you should go for it. No offense, but, to me, Master's (that is relevant to you) is a better investment of time and money than BSN. In some places, BSN is required to work as an RN, that is true. But not everywhere. With Master's, you have more opportunities for the future, and you would undoubtedly take something useful out of the program while doing research. As have been said earlier, sometimes you discover what you like by accident. I would never think I would enjoy teaching, but I had to, for my Master's (Science), and I found that I really enjoy it, because I saw the students enjoyed coming to my class. Tell us, what you think about getting MSN?

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