Can I say pelvic fracture in my nursing diagnosis?

  1. ?

    As in

    Impaired bed mobility related to pelvic fracture...blah blah?
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  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   Lisa CCU RN
    No. That's a medical diagnosis.

    Do you have a nursing diagnosis book?
    Is the pt. on bed rest?

    How about impaired physical mobility r/t pelvic immobilization.
  4. by   Bonny619
    Thanks, I got it.
  5. by   Daytonite
    some nursing programs and instructors allow students to use medical diagnoses in this way:

    impaired bed mobility r/t pelvic immobilization secondary to pelvic fracture aeb impaired ability to:
    • turn side to side
    • move from supine to sitting or sitting to supine
    • "scoot" or reposition self in bed
    • move from supine to prone or prone to supine
    • move from supine to long sitting or long sitting to supine
    • page 117, nursing diagnoses: definitions & classification 2005-2006 published by nanda international
    don't do it unless your instructors have told you it's ok to.
  6. by   jov
    Quote from Bonny619
    ?

    As in

    Impaired bed mobility related to pelvic fracture...blah blah?

    the pelvic fracture doesn't cause the impaired bed mobility

    but the pain from it does.... got it?
  7. by   Bonny619
    Not necessarily. My patient wasn't in any pain, she was just immobile.

    From my care plan book I ended up using Impaired bed mobility related to musculoskeletal impairment.

    Quote from jov
    the pelvic fracture doesn't cause the impaired bed mobility

    but the pain from it does.... got it?
  8. by   SanskeetRN
    I once used impaired physical mobility R/T breach in bone integrity....it was harder coming up w/ a nonmedical term for fracture than the whole diagnosis!
  9. by   Bonny619
    lol, exactly.

    Quote from sanskeet
    I once used impaired physical mobility R/T breach in bone integrity....it was harder coming up w/ a nonmedical term for fracture than the whole diagnosis!
  10. by   Achoo!
    Not related to bone fractures, but in regards to a pt with CHF and possible MI, I used "related to disease process". My instructor accepted it!
  11. by   SanskeetRN
    This isn't related to bone fracture either, but had to share that I had to describe on a care plan what it meant to 'encourage fluids'. At midnight it is not easy to come up with how to explain encourage and not sound like an idiot LOL 'to support, teach, offer' was what I came up with and my instructor said that's what it means. I just wonder why it has to be made more difficult than it already is? having to spend 15 minutes figuring out how to define encourage takes 15 minutes away from actually doing nursing processes. Plus, does anyone not really know what encourage or ambulate mean :smackingf
  12. by   Bonny619
    Hmm, we're allowed to say encourage and ambulate.
  13. by   SanskeetRN
    Sorry I didn't explain that very well. When we do our care plan, we have to list our interventions, and then define them. So using encourage fluids for my intervention, I would have to define what encouring fluids means..so something along the lines of 'teaching, supporting the pt. to ingest liquids' or something like that.
  14. by   Bonny619
    Interesting! We have to put rationales with our interventions.

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