Anyone besides me not taking hospital scholarships to not get "locked in"?

  1. I was just wondering how many students have local hospitals offering full nursing scholarships to RN students, that weren't taking them.

    Here, they offer to pay for your tuition, plus a $1,000 per semester stripend (after taxes!). You have to work a 3-year contract if you take out more than $6,000.

    The problem is, you have no choice of which department to choose. That is my major reason for not accepting the scholarships.
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  2. 22 Comments

  3. by   MiaKeaRN
    I'm attending a community college and paying my own way, because I didn't want to be locked into anyone for 3 years. I know a lot of folks wanted the free tuition, but I'm the type of person who wants to make my own decisions about where I work.
  4. by   Multicollinearity
    I'm not going to sign any contracts. I could have done so to get into a nursing program, and I'm glad I held out and didn't.

    I do have one concern. It seems that so many students are on stipends/contracts with their hospitals - will most of the new grad jobs be taken when graduation time rolls around? It seems students have 'relationships' with their target hospitals more often than not. It's not hard to get a nursing job, but I suspect it's not quite easy to get a NEW GRAD nursing job. Maybe this is where the summer externships can be beneficial?
  5. by   MikeyJ
    Quote from multicollinearity
    I'm not going to sign any contracts. I could have done so to get into a nursing program, and I'm glad I held out and didn't.

    I do have one concern. It seems that so many students are on stipends/contracts with their hospitals - will most of the new grad jobs be taken when graduation time rolls around? It seems students have 'relationships' with their target hospitals more often than not. It's not hard to get a nursing job, but I suspect it's not quite easy to get a NEW GRAD nursing job. Maybe this is where the summer externships can be beneficial?
    In response to your question -- the students I know who graduated already typically applied at the hospital that they did their final preceptorship at. I have heard of new grads acquiring jobs right out of nursing school, and some who took more than 6 - 8 months to get a job. It also depends on how quickly you take your NCLEX. I personally plan to take the NCLEX ASAP after graduating, but I know some who waited upto 4 or 5 months to take their NCLEX.

    In reference to the OP's question -- there is no way I would ever sign a contract with a hospital in return for my tuition being paid for. I have heard HORROR stories of students who have signed contracts. There is one hospital in my area that pays for your tuition with a 2-year contract to work for them. However, this hospital is notorious for insane nurseatient ratios, and for nursing strikes. But students continually sign contracts in return for their tuition to be paid for.
  6. by   karlita
    That is too bad that you can't choose where you want to start. I almost didn't apply for the scholarship program too. I'm glad I did because I had an accident that completely changed my financial situation and would never have been able to pay for the first program (non-scholarship) that I was accepted into. I know several RNs who have graduated from the program I will be starting, and they were all able to choose what area they wanted to work in. I've also already worked for this company for several years, they have many locations in the US, and their program is 16mo.

    I think you're smart to not take a hospital scholarship program if you can avoid it, especially if you can't choose what department you get work in. As for all the new grad jobs being taken...I'm personally not too concerned about that; I really don't think that will happen, at least not in my area.
  7. by   Megsd
    I think it's like anything else, really. You have to carefully examine the contract, who's offering it, and why. I took a contract with a hospital, but it is only offered to people in my accelerated program because it's a new program that was developed in partnership with that hospital. The hospital is magnet (whatever that's worth so far) and I have never heard a negative thing about it from current or former employees. I am also eligible to apply for any new graduate job available, so my job prospects are really no different than had I not signed the contract.

    Had the hospital been offering assistance because they can't get nurses any other way, I definitely wouldn't do it. However, I did my research and felt comfortable committing two years of my time to a hospital I wanted to work at anyway. It's not always a bad idea.
  8. by   CT Pixie
    Currently, I am 7 months from graduating LPN school. Good Lord willing I will pass the NCLEX.

    My plan from there is to get my foot in the door of a very reputable hospital that has a reputation of treating their nurses well. They do hire LPN's for certain floors. I plan on working for the hospital for less pay than I could make at the nursing homes BUT let the hospital pay for my RN schooling. Of course I'll look into the fine print and see exactly whats what before I sign 2-3 yrs of my life away.

    Yup, thats the "plan", time shall tell if it all pans out. Like one of the regular posters quote line says..if you want to hear God laugh, tell him your plans.
  9. by   justme1972
    Quote from karlita
    That is too bad that you can't choose where you want to start. I almost didn't apply for the scholarship program too. I'm glad I did because I had an accident that completely changed my financial situation and would never have been able to pay for the first program (non-scholarship) that I was accepted into. I know several RNs who have graduated from the program I will be starting, and they were all able to choose what area they wanted to work in. I've also already worked for this company for several years, they have many locations in the US, and their program is 16mo.

    I think you're smart to not take a hospital scholarship program if you can avoid it, especially if you can't choose what department you get work in. As for all the new grad jobs being taken...I'm personally not too concerned about that; I really don't think that will happen, at least not in my area.
    I am actually considering contacting the nurse recruiter at the hospital that is my first choice and just asking...if this is a possibility.

    You never know what they may tell you. I'll post back if it works.
  10. by   karlita
    Well, you're right, it's like they say...It never hurts to ask. I hope it works out to your benefit and definitely keep me posted! Good luck!
  11. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from karlita
    As for all the new grad jobs being taken...I'm personally not too concerned about that; I really don't think that will happen, at least not in my area.
    Yes. I bet it will be fine where I am, too. I worry too much. About many, many things LOL.
  12. by   Monica D
    I almost took that route. I just couldn't bring myself to do it because one of the stipulations was that if you get discharged due to grades, etc. from the program, you are still responsible for paying that money back to the hospital. I couldn't get past that. I was too afraid that I would get into it, not be able to make it through, then be stuck paying for an education that I was not getting. Luckily, I got accepted to the regular program at my college and bypassed the whole thing anyway.
  13. by   krenee
    I am going to apply for a hospital scholarship. It's the only hospital I want to work at due to the location - I don't want to commute. I have a friend who went through the program. She started out working in the area of her choice, didn't like it, and switched to another area, which she loves. So she clearly had plenty of flexibility. I don't foresee any problems. I am only going to be able to get a one year scholarship, but I'll only have to work for one year to pay it back. I have worried that they will pay me less, however, if I'm committed to work there. I don't know if I may be better off being able to negotiate my salary, but I suspect as a new grad with no clinical experience, there's not that much negotiation power!

    Kelly
  14. by   jemommyRN
    If I could pick which unit I worked in then fine. But, you are not going to stick in me in a super short med surg floor and burn me out of my nursing career early! I don't think so.

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