A Student Learned the HARD way... (a little long) - page 3

..about how serious pt. confidentiality and access to their chart info is. (this was unbelievable) On a med-surg floor a group of students were assigned. A patient on that floor just happened to... Read More

  1. by   fergus51
    Not to mention the fact that an RN couldn't get away with that. Do you think the board of nursing would care if you were on the clock or not when you violated a patient's right to confidentiality and had to be escorted out of the building?LOL!! Not likely!
  2. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    And chances are, it would be the NM/DON's business even if that happened on another floor.
  3. by   Gator,SN
    Ok...I must have read the first post really fast, so I missed the point about the instructor not being on the floor because clinical was over.....my bad. I did say that this person, April, behaved badly. I just was unclear about how the other students heard the whole conversation between the nurse and the brother, including him smiling when asked about his pain..etc. and also stuck around long enough on the floor to watch all this action transpire. If I was dismissed and my instructor left the floor, I left too, per policy of my school.
    I don't want to seem like the Lone Ranger here, and I do not excuse unprofessional behavior for other nurses/students, nor did I mean to sound like some tenderheart who thinks any of this was ok.
    On the other hand, It was not ok for the nurse to talk about the incident the next day with the other students. This whole situation was bad for all parties involved.
    Gator
  4. by   BabyRN2Be
    Wow, I haven't read the whole thread yet, but that was totally incompetent of "April" to tell the doctor how to manage his/her patient.

    Stress does come into play this time of year with spring break and exams just around the corner, but this was just totally out of line. It just a shame, too. She was so close to graduating. All the education and money down the tube.

    That's the sad part... I'll read the rest of the thread tomorrow when I'm not so tired, I just wanted to say something now.
  5. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from Gator,SN
    Ok...I must have read the first post really fast, so I missed the point about the instructor not being on the floor because clinical was over.....my bad. I did say that this person, April, behaved badly. I just was unclear about how the other students heard the whole conversation between the nurse and the brother, including him smiling when asked about his pain..etc. and also stuck around long enough on the floor to watch all this action transpire. If I was dismissed and my instructor left the floor, I left too, per policy of my school.
    I don't want to seem like the Lone Ranger here, and I do not excuse unprofessional behavior for other nurses/students, nor did I mean to sound like some tenderheart who thinks any of this was ok.
    On the other hand, It was not ok for the nurse to talk about the incident the next day with the other students. This whole situation was bad for all parties involved.
    Gator

    None of the other students heard her, they'd already left for the day, and she was the only one on that floor. I was only there doing an extra clerking job for the extra hours.

    The only thing the instructor said to the other students (the next day) was yet another reminder of pt. confidentiality. She said nothing about the student, although it was obvious something had happened when her clinical locker door was wide open and empty.
  6. by   Mandylpn
    Not only did she get dismissed for patient confidentiality, her big mouth got her in trouble. She needs some help and it is her own fault. You do not go shooting off your mouth like that to anyone, let alone when you are on clinical. It's her own fault and no sympathy from me. :chuckle :chuckle
  7. by   Mandylpn
    Quote from LPN2Be2004
    The nursee's take on it (what she said this morning) was this: "I'd rather take a bunch of **** off of someone if it seals their fate that they'll never be in my position EVER."


    The patient was discharged, so luckily we won't see her around anymore. And now, the hospital is going to bring up charges.
    This just keeps getting better and better! :chuckle :chuckle :chuckle
  8. by   Mandylpn
    Quote from christinemj
    Interesting....

    Yes, this person used poor judgemnet... but WHY was the clinical instructor called in the first place. If the student was "off-duty," it was none of the INSTUCTOR'S business either.

    This was an issue for security..... not the instructor.
    As a student, you are a representative of your school. :uhoh21:
  9. by   nursesrocks
    I feel sorry for her. I was wrote up one time for flippin off someone at work. Lol. I'm still employed there hehe. I already learned my lesson you can't get your emotions rule you.
  10. by   FNimuaeMae
    On a tangent... There was a gal in my nursing school class who ended up backing the instructor into a wall during an arguement. She ended up flunking out but they let her come back into the program (they allow you to repeat any semester only ONCE!) and try again. She flunked out AGAIN, and ended up calling in a bomb threat to the school. Turns out she did have mental health issues, but most certainly got jail time for this.:stone

    Missy
  11. by   LesJenRN
    NOT someone you want taking care of patients. That is unbelievable.
  12. by   colleen10
    Good ridence to bad rubish is what I have to say.

    This person has no business being a nurse and thank goodness the nursing instructor was there to dismiss her from the program.

    I can accept that emotions in stressful situations can get the best of people but her reaction was uncalled for. Her brother had a kidney stone, he wasn't dying. He wasn't even in all that much pain. Her situation was far from that pain and dying scene in "Terms of Endearment".

    Scary that she made it that far in the program with that type of attitude.

    I think everyone needs to remember that you can't just "shut off" being a nurse. Off Duty you are held to the same standards as you would be if you were On Duty. Same goes for students.

    If an off duty RN came onto the floor and started treating the staff that way and going through medical records they would have been removed by security as well and probably have the state BON called on them. It's no different when you're a student.

    Also, in some state's you don't work off of your instructors' license, you work off of your own Student Nurse License, so if she had been my state what she did would have put her student license in grave jeopardy and it may be up to the BON to let her keep it or permanently remove it from her, not the school.
  13. by   Quicksilver
    Quote from Catma63
    I'm totally shocked to think a nursing student would dare to behave in such a way. She had to have been out of her mind nuts to do so!
    The nursing instructor was right in kicking her out of school. Though I hate it when someone is dismissed from a program, I can't imagine this could have gone any other way. I can only imagine what was going on in everyone's mind that witnessed this and am sorry to hear that that nurse had to endure such abuse.
    Wow, April was WAY out of line. I agree she needed to be kicked out for her behaviour, which was extremely unprofessional! Something is obviously up with that girl for her to wig out like that, maybe it's fortunate that she was caught before she graduated and went out into the world. Seems like the nurse acted very appropriately, too bad she had to put up with that crap!! :uhoh21:

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